Pronation from the wrist/forearm idea

Discussion in 'Tennis Tips/Instruction' started by Steven87, May 17, 2006.

  1. Steven87

    Steven87 Semi-Pro

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    I didn't know pronation helped so much! Heres my "theory."

    Pronation from forearm only
    : Pure drive shot, a deep and almost flat shot
    Pronation from wrist only: Pure topspin shot, wont go long though, most likely to go high
    Pronation from wrist/forearm: A semi-high mix of topspin and a drive. Basically a semi-high long topspin shot

    What do you think of this idea?
     
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  2. nViATi

    nViATi Hall of Fame

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    Last time I checked, you can't rotate your wrist or forearm independently.
     
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  3. Steven87

    Steven87 Semi-Pro

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    Yes you can.....just keep your wrist firmer so it wont have the windwiping motion
     
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  4. Mahboob Khan

    Mahboob Khan Hall of Fame

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    Pronation (wrist-forearm) is normally associated with serve (continental grip) because without pronation you will be hitting the ball with the edge of your frame. Pronation lines up the racket head to hit the ball.

    In modern tennis, it also occurs on forehand ground stroke!

    I do not think it is possible to keep the wrist fixed and just pronate with forearm or keep the forearm fixed and pronate with wrist! Pronation, according to my view, is done with wrist and forearm.
     
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  5. Bungalo Bill

    Bungalo Bill G.O.A.T.

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    You can not pronate the wrist or hand alone without the forearm involved. There are no muscles in the wrist, it is mainly all tendons. The muscles in the arm and natural motion is what causes pronation.
     
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  6. tim3

    tim3 New User

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    The wrist only allows the hand to flex, extended or deviate towards the thumb/pinky. The articulation is more or less oval in shape, so it does not allow hand rotation (pronation/supination).
    Pronation and supination take place in the forearm and elbow only and the hand can freely pronate/supinate with the wrist locked at any postures. The movements are produced by rotation of one of the 2 forearm bones around the other. The bone moves the hand as it rotates, resulting in pronation or supination.
    The shoulder is a large joint that permits movements of the arm in virtually any directions. I think some the movements mentioned in the posts actually take place in the shoulder joint.
     
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  7. Mahboob Khan

    Mahboob Khan Hall of Fame

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    Tim3: It appears you know it better. Good explanation.
     
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