pros and cons of extended length racquets?

Discussion in 'Racquets' started by zenit, Aug 22, 2005.

  1. zenit

    zenit Rookie

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    there are a lot of 27+ inch racquets on the market nowadays. What are the pros and cons of having that extra .5 to 1 inch on the racquet outside the obvious harder serving?
     
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  2. azak

    azak Rookie

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    I know the extended grip is for two-handed backhand.

    Thats all I can give you..
     
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  3. Speedy_tennis

    Speedy_tennis Semi-Pro

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    pros- more spin, more power, better in serves and 2 handed backhands

    cons- less control in volleys(experts say that, but i think depending were is the player sweetspot)
     
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  4. raftermania

    raftermania Banned

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    A longer racquet will put more strain on your elbow.
     
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  5. kreative

    kreative Professional

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    pros: more power, more leverage, more reach, better serves and 2 handed backhands

    cons: less manueverability, sluggish on volleys, tough for 1 hand backhand, get jammed easily (volleys)
     
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  6. monologuist

    monologuist Hall of Fame

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    I have no problem using a 27.5" racquet with a 1-handed backhand. It took a little time to get used to, but once I did, it felt fine. To me, it has been worth the small loss of manueuverability involved on most shots for the overall better serving. I once posted asking if there were pros that had 1-handers that used extended length racquets, and there were a surprising amount. But yes, with a 2-handed backhand, it is probably even more natural. The other thing I like about 27.5" racquets is that you can go in between (27.25") if you want to compromise, or even go down to standard, by cutting down the handle a little....so if you're not sure if extended length is for you, you can try it and modify to your liking.
     
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  7. Michelangelo

    Michelangelo Professional

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    Just personal method. If I play with rackets longer than 27", I'll either switch to 2-hand backhand (though not as good as my regular one-hand backhand), or simply grip a bit higher so it works similar to standard length sticks, especially for volley.
     
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  8. BreakPoint

    BreakPoint Bionic Poster

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    I agree that longer racquets put more stress on your elbow. I ended up getting tennis elbow using a 27.5" racquet a while back. The advantage is that it gives you more reach and a little more pop on serves.
     
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  9. Vamz

    Vamz Rookie

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    I found they are really good for longer strokes, my timing seemed better. But when rushed, I had a tough time getting around the ball. I guess that is why clay courters love the longer sticks. I found it made my forehand better, my serve a lot better, but my returns and volleys much worse.
     
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  10. smittysan89

    smittysan89 Professional

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    i hold my grip up a little more than most people do plus I have a long stroke so it helped with that along with my 2 handed backhand. But, i seemed to get jammed more and the serve return was a little harder. Really just takes a little bit to get used to.
     
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  11. monologuist

    monologuist Hall of Fame

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    I've always wondered if this is necessarily true. The extra length increases the swingweight, but typically, that stresses your shoulder more than your elbow. Also, the extra length usually makes the racquet about 2 pts. RA more flexible.

    In terms of advantages, the extra length also can give you higher serve %, since there is more angle (it gives you more height essentially). This also true in terms of laterally on the court (more angles). Also more power and more spin on topspin shots and kickserves.
     
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  12. BreakPoint

    BreakPoint Bionic Poster

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    The increased stress on you elbow has to do with physics, and not just with weight or swingweight. When the point of impact is further away from your arm/elbow, it puts more torque on that area. The rotational force at point A is equal to the force applied at point B times the distance from point A to point B. You can think of it as using a wrench with a very short handle versus using one with a very long handle to loosen a tight nut. It's much easier to apply force and loosen the nut with the wrench with the longer handle because you can apply greater rotational force to the nut with your hand applying the force from a greater distance.
     
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  13. gonzalocatalino

    gonzalocatalino Hall of Fame

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    in my personal experience (3.0, all court player, 1hbh): the extended lenght really improve my serve and add power
     
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  14. planetark

    planetark Guest

    I heard that the extra length increases the impulse time during contact. Don't remember my physics but I think that's the same principle they use to make cars safer during collisions. It takes longer for the front to collapse and less force reaches the driver. I heard the same principle applies to the extra long tennis racquet, the extra length increases the time it takes for the force to travel down the frame and hence less force? Not too sure about this and I could very well be mistaken.

    I've played the Prince Precision Longbody 690 for years now. Never had a problem. I might not play as much as some people so that might be a factor. I found the longer racquet helps heaps for serving and groundies. I use a 1h backhand and found the extra length helpful actually. More spin and power. Volleys are definitely a bit more sluggish but then again it helps when you are reaching for a volley when the passing shot is hit away from you. I didn't find stability an issue but then again my racquet has one of those stabilising bars in the throat. That's my 2 cents.
     
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