Pros and Cons of the Isometric head

Discussion in 'Racquets' started by Lilguy1456, Feb 8, 2013.

  1. Lilguy1456

    Lilguy1456 Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2012
    Messages:
    782
    Just picked up an older Yonex RDX 500 Mid. Had some ups and downs (the good shots were GREAT, and the not so good shots were AWFUL). I'm sure it was mostly user error, but what are people's experiences with the Yonex head shape. I know it's been discussed, but I didn't feel like digging through old threads. :)
     
    #1
  2. racertempo

    racertempo Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    May 17, 2011
    Messages:
    661
    Location:
    Charlotte, NC area
    Love the head shape, some of their newer frames are a little more square looking then others. The Ezone is a little more square then the Vcore, but the forgiveness is unparalleled in the industry. If you can adjust to the visual you can/will quickly become addicted to yonex frames.....but some people cannot get past that visual.
     
    #2
  3. ollinger

    ollinger Legend

    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2004
    Messages:
    5,907
    It's axiomatic that when something's been around for as long as this thing has and hasn't become very popular, it has no real advantage.
     
    #3
  4. Lilguy1456

    Lilguy1456 Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2012
    Messages:
    782
    That's an interesting point...might be emperically true also.
     
    #4
  5. sureshs

    sureshs Bionic Poster

    Joined:
    Oct 1, 2005
    Messages:
    34,727
    Not necessarily. Other companies may have expanded more, marketed more, had other features, etc.

    The Mac is a good example. For those who love them (I don't), it is a case of a clearly advantageous product which managed to find only a niche market, due to hardware monopoly and cost, and more aggressive marketing of cheaper alternatives.
     
    #5
  6. Power Player

    Power Player G.O.A.T.

    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2008
    Messages:
    19,756
    Location:
    On my iPhone
    The headshape is awesome for spin hitters. It widens the sweet spot and works really well. I was really impressed with the 200 RDIS, but the newer YYs are stiffer than I prefer.
     
    #6
  7. racertempo

    racertempo Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    May 17, 2011
    Messages:
    661
    Location:
    Charlotte, NC area
    Um.......because I am pretty sure it is a patent of Yonex.

    You can ask the same thing about O-Ports from Prince, or any technology/gimmicky thing that a marketing company comes up with. Wilson PWS, Wilson 16x15 pattern.

    There is no denying that the isometric shape equates to a large sweet spot, which in turns means more forgiveness.
     
    #7
  8. Boricua

    Boricua Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2011
    Messages:
    3,084
    You have been experimenting with high swingweights lately. why dont you demo the VCORE 97 Tour 330? Specs are similar to the Wilson 6.1 according to Carol from TW (she said that in her review). And, it should feel less stiff than the 95 D I suppose, its thinner beamed if that has to do anything with it.
     
    #8
  9. rdis10093

    rdis10093 Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2011
    Messages:
    3,879
    Location:
    states
    no cons only pros
     
    #9
  10. OHBH

    OHBH Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2009
    Messages:
    590
    Wider sweetspot from 3 to 9 makes it more forgiving and spin friendly off the ground. Narrower sweetpot from 12 to 6 makes is less forgiving and powerful on serves and overheads. Not quite sure how this would effect the volley stroke.
     
    #10
  11. Power Player

    Power Player G.O.A.T.

    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2008
    Messages:
    19,756
    Location:
    On my iPhone
    Not really interested in any racquets over 63ishRA.
     
    #11
  12. Dimcorner

    Dimcorner Professional

    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2012
    Messages:
    814
    Here is my feeling from all the badminton racquets I owned from them.

    The Iso shape they use offers a pretty large sweet spot. This allowed me to use higher tension and still have large enough sweet spot to have good control and not pop strings on mis-hits. My strings are .65mm thick (22 gauge)...

    Yonex started to round out their head designs in the last few years with the new Z-slash line and I noticed that the sweetspot was smaller BUT I got a bit more power out of it and it felt (when you hit it dead on) that the shuttle just exploded out of the racquet. It's still an iso shape but not as much

    You can see the difference between a Nanospeed 9900 vs Z-slash.

    [​IMG]
    (quite a few images if you google it).

    For me in badminton I like the hybrid between oval and iso. Gives it a little more punch than the iso shape but not such a small sweet-spot as an oval.
     
    Last edited: Feb 8, 2013
    #12
  13. Lilguy1456

    Lilguy1456 Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2012
    Messages:
    782
    Did you just weigh in discussing badminton sticks? Just making sure...
     
    #13
  14. moopie

    moopie Rookie

    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2006
    Messages:
    177
    Location:
    San Jose, CA
    I've been using the RDS 001 Mid for... maybe 6 years now? However many years it's been out. It's the original bright yellow one.

    Realistically, I think what it does is extend the sweetspot at the cost of a really awesome sweetspot.

    Pros: Less difference in feel/control/power/spin when hitting different part of the stringbed.

    Cons: Hitting dead center does not give you as good of feel/control/power/spin as a regular head racket.

    At least that's my experience. I really like it since I prefer more predictability, and I'm not a "hit it dead center everytime" player.
     
    #14
  15. isilra

    isilra Rookie

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2012
    Messages:
    160
    I think this is the most logical explanation. I also wonder how the isometric head shape effects the timing or so. I'm asking because today i have played with rdis 200 for the first time and my game was totally broken, i'm pretty sure it's a matter of getting used to and i need some time but just wondering why the head shape effects your game.
     
    #15
  16. corners

    corners Legend

    Joined:
    Jul 31, 2008
    Messages:
    5,441
    I don't think anybody is. A video study done recently showed that Djoker, Fed and Nadal all missed the center of the strings more often than they hit it. If you're swinging fast and steep for spin you're just not going to hit the middle of the strings all the time, even if you're a Goat or a Goat contender.

    I think somebody mentioned it above, but I think the biggest advantage of the Isometric shape is how friendly it is to hitting with spin. When swinging fast and steep at a ball at waist height, the ball enters the racquet's "spin window" at around 10 or 11 o'clock and exits around 4 or 5 o'clock. If you're a bit early on your swing you'll clip at 10 or 11 and if you're a bit late you'll catch the frame at 4 or 5. The Yonex heads, being more squared off, are wider at these positions. So much so that, when hitting with topspin, a Yonex 98 offers the effective spin window of some brands' 104 square-inch frames. So you get the forgiveness of a larger frame but the precision of a smaller frame, or at least it seems so. There are other brands that have headshapes that offer big spin windows too - Prince, Bab, the old Speeds, the Blade 104, etc.
     
    #16
  17. Sander001

    Sander001 Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Jul 6, 2012
    Messages:
    2,285
    Location:
    In the place where there is no darkness.
    I've been using Yonex for 10+ yrs now and I don't see myself ever switching.

    Recently I was interested in going for a Mid+ perhaps and it seemed like the Prestige Pro was perfect for the specs I wanted. But damn, it's 8sq" larger than my Yonex and still it's got a smaller sweetspot.

    Another thing that the iso head gives is that the benefit of stringing the mains and crosses at different tensions seems really amplified.
     
    #17
  18. Lilguy1456

    Lilguy1456 Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2012
    Messages:
    782
    It's unbelievable...the RDX 500 mid has a 90 sq in head, and it feels like 100...super forgiving somehow.
     
    #18
  19. ollinger

    ollinger Legend

    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2004
    Messages:
    5,907
    racertempo
    Patents are not forever. In the US and Europe, patents typically run 20 years from the time of filing (so usually much less than 20 years in practice), in Asia they're often shorter. So anybody can make an isometric head racquet as Yonex has been doing it for much more than 20 years.
     
    #19
  20. corners

    corners Legend

    Joined:
    Jul 31, 2008
    Messages:
    5,441
    Could you expand on this? I'm curious as I'm just getting into Yonex.
     
    #20
  21. racertempo

    racertempo Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    May 17, 2011
    Messages:
    661
    Location:
    Charlotte, NC area
    Okay, but you point was there was no benefit and that if there was other manufacturers would use it.....but every single other person on here see a clear advantage to the shape. It is the Yonex thing, just like the O ports as I mentioned. Anyone else that did it would just look like a copy and people would see it that way.
     
    #21
  22. syke

    syke Professional

    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2012
    Messages:
    1,356
    I feel weird playing with rounded head shapes... I much prefer the isometric shape.
     
    #22
  23. Dimcorner

    Dimcorner Professional

    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2012
    Messages:
    814
    Yeah just to give my feedback on sweet spot size and frame strength. It seems you can get away with thinner heads with oval shape than with isometrics (as well as going higher tension with ovals).
     
    #23
  24. babar

    babar Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2004
    Messages:
    702
    I have played with non-Yonex frames for 15 years. I recently tried the Yonex line and really found a profound difference in feel. The EZone frames have massive sweet spots. The VCore frames also have really big sweetspots but they felt more unstable on off-center hits. I switched to the EZone and am really liking it.
     
    #24
  25. Sander001

    Sander001 Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Jul 6, 2012
    Messages:
    2,285
    Location:
    In the place where there is no darkness.
    The shape allows the lengths of the mains and crosses to be more uniform, and so goes the tensions. So when the mains and crosses intersect, there's also a more uniformed interaction between them.
     
    #25
  26. Steve Huff

    Steve Huff Legend

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2004
    Messages:
    7,257
    I used to play with th R 22. I think they really do have a bigger sweetspot. The disadvantage I saw was that the frames were more fragile at 2, 10 and 12. However, I also have an RD 7, and it feels as though it could withstand about anything a tennis player could throw at it.
     
    #26
  27. tistrapukcipeht

    tistrapukcipeht Professional

    Joined:
    Mar 13, 2012
    Messages:
    1,324
    I also have been so used to the big sweet spot of the isometric shapes over the years (8 years now), that for me in unnatural to play with round shapes, the round racquets look bigger and cumbersome for the same yonex sizes, but with small sweet spot, so I don't myself playing with anything else.
     
    #27
  28. cneblett

    cneblett Rookie

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2009
    Messages:
    141
    I have tried to play with isometric frames a few times. The yonex and barb brands. I could never feel comfortable hitting with them. How it comes in or looks just mentally throw me off. They are well made. Some people have real issues with them because of how they look and feel, others love them. If I could have ever overcome whatever basic issue with the isometric frames I would have switched, just never could
     
    #28
  29. Anton

    Anton Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Apr 9, 2007
    Messages:
    3,127
    Location:
    Staten Island
    I don't really notice any significant difference.
     
    #29
  30. VeryVolkl

    VeryVolkl New User

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2009
    Messages:
    79
    Location:
    Western New York
    I've demoed quite a few of Yonex's offerings and (a) liked nearly all of them, (b) noticed no discernible difference from other sticks. Great racquets and great finish quality.
     
    #30
  31. tistrapukcipeht

    tistrapukcipeht Professional

    Joined:
    Mar 13, 2012
    Messages:
    1,324
    I notice a big difference, specially in the sweet spot size, stability and lack of vibrations, it's silent and quiet, I don;t even use VD.
     
    #31
  32. VeryVolkl

    VeryVolkl New User

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2009
    Messages:
    79
    Location:
    Western New York
    I've been looking on the 'bay at some of the older (last decade) Yonex racquets. The last new models I tried were the RDS001 and 002, the RDiS200, and Ivanovic's old racquet (it was black and red and had a thick beam at 9 &3).
     
    #32

Share This Page