Purpose of the "pat the dog"

Discussion in 'Tennis Tips/Instruction' started by aimr75, Mar 16, 2009.

  1. Mansewerz

    Mansewerz Legend

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    Lately, i've been patting the dog on the head, and getting more spin, but i've been shanking a lot.

    Could this be from being used to a more "going through" the ball follow through and switching to a more topspin approach?
     
    #51
  2. Bungalo Bill

    Bungalo Bill G.O.A.T.

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    LOL!!!! Yeah right! Trying to save face! You havent heard that at all chump!! I have been around tennis for years and taught for Vic Braden! Quit lying! You have no idea what you are talking about.

    And as far as debating your comment on a coach using one little extra step as being stupid, bring it!

    Well I will disrespect you and will be glad doing it. You are the one that opened your mouth and said coaches that use this step are stupid. And if you didnt use those exact words, you certainly implied it.

    I am not selling anything Mr. THREE STEP. You are the one selling your "way" by downplaying another "way". Which is absolutely ridiculous and directly shows you lack of tennis coaching knowledge!

    I am simply pointing out that your comment about the "pat-the-dog-on-the-head" is not only imnappropriate and direspectful but completely wrong. If a coach wants to use a four step process to educate and train players on how to hit a forehand, only an idiot like you would say "oh four step is wrong." LOL!

    Yeah, no kidding. I would rather get that fourth step in there for the reasons stated in the above posts. If you want to use a three point reference you go right ahead. However, that is only your preference to use it and has no basis on "that is all you need".

    A coach is going to use what he feels works best to get to the same point based on what he has learned, what he is seeing in his students, and what he needs. For you to say otherwise is completely moronic.

    LOL! Yeah, go beat yourself! Go ahead and keep being stupid, I will be sure to read your posts a lot more closely. I can always use a good laugh. LOL!!!
     
    Last edited: Mar 21, 2009
    #52
  3. Bungalo Bill

    Bungalo Bill G.O.A.T.

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    Hi Jolly,

    I have three kids. Ages 13, 11, and 9.

    I have two daughters and one son. Boy is in the middle. My oldest daughter has incredibly beautiful tennis strokes but it is tough to get her interested in sticking with tennis.

    My son is profoundly deaf and uses a cochlear implant to hear. He is in public school and struggles mainly with reading comprehension and speech/language to be expected. He is extremely athletic but has never been interested in tennis seriously except to go out and play with the family or when I take the kids out and coach them. Although I have seen a little spark of interest of late.

    My youngest daughter is not athletic at all. She is simply a loving compliant child that loves to read books. lol
     
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  4. J011yroger

    J011yroger G.O.A.T.

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    Best of luck to them all.

    And props to you for not forcing the tennis on the oldest. My doubles partner has the same issue, although his daughter is only 7. I ask if he is going to get serious, and he tells me "Well, she doesn't really dig it, so I am not going to force it on her. As long as she is active at something, and having fun, then tennis will just be a side thing unless the bug bites her."

    J
     
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  5. drake

    drake Semi-Pro

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    Agreed, but you have incredible hand-to-eye, which I'm sure gets you many wins.
     
    #55
  6. J011yroger

    J011yroger G.O.A.T.

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    I have a lot of natural power.

    I have incredible video editing skills which make it look like I have incredible hand-to-eye. :)

    Win some, lose some, just matters which side of the bed I get up on.

    Should be a fun year.

    J
     
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  7. stormholloway

    stormholloway Legend

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    Who comprise this "lot of guys" with "much better strokes" than Federer exactly? What makes their strokes better? Do you really think everyone is just so gullible and stupid that they see greatness in Federer's forehand that isn't there?

    Talk about succumbing to your own accusation. Nadal's forehand benefits GREATLY from being left-handed. Did you not take this into account before typing it? He's hitting his forehand into others' backhands. Surely you thought of this. Nadal's and Federer's techniques on the forehand side are actually quite similar in essence.

    So Roddick's forehand is "amazing" but there is "a lot of guys" with "much better" forehands than Federer? And if Roddick's forehand is the best it can be then why was it clearly so much more powerful many years ago?

    Yes he does. If these two players stood crosscourt from each other and went forehand to forehand for 20 rallies, Andy's forehand would breakdown the overwhelming majority of those rallies.
     
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  8. Slicendicer

    Slicendicer Guest

    Hi Stormy... you should stay in the rants and raves section, eh?

    You misquote me as saying " blah-blah " but that is not what I said... I said "technically better strokes"...


    You assert Nadal's dominant FH is because he is a "lefty".... right. Then you state.. "Nadal's and Federer's techniques on the forehand side are actually quite similar in essence"... classic... I really do love when you chime in... couldn't really be 2 different FH's, except what happens at contact... thanks...

    Your "20 FH to FH rally" between Fed and Roddick is in your mind... if 1 FH "breaks down" it wouldn't be because 1 FH is definitively better than the other... maybe 1 player hit the wrong FH... get it?

    Maybe you understand tennis at a later date... :)
     
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  9. Slicendicer

    Slicendicer Guest


    Ok... thanks Bill... you are a great teacher, we can all learn from this post...
     
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  10. stormholloway

    stormholloway Legend

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    Trust me when I say that these kind of quotes make you look less qualified, not moreso.

    And? Who are these guys and why are their forehands "technically better"?

    I asserted no such thing. Who is misquoting whom here? I simply pointed out that you failed to even mention the fact that Nadal is typically hitting his strength into opponents' weaknesses and that this is a benefit. Pretending that it doesn't exist doesn't make it so.

    And actually, as was explained earlier by the FYB guy, there are distinct similarities in their forehand strokes.

    You, however, claimed that "genetics" were the difference in their forehands. Brilliant...

    It's a hypothetical situation. If both players are playing their best, as in the best they've been seen to have played, Roddick's forehand would be the one to break down. This isn't necessarily due to technique. Djokovic would do the same to Roddick's forehand on their best days and those two have similar techniques. But to pretend that Federer's forehand isn't better than Roddick's is just being stubborn, or worse. Anyone with a pair of working eyes can see the stark difference.

    It's a common misconception on internet forums that you can simply condescend your way to winning an argument.
     
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  11. wihamilton

    wihamilton Hall of Fame

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    No I didn't. You might be confusing me with someone else (perhaps Slicendicer?). My argument was that Federer's forehand technique is superior to Roddick's. Genetics is certainly important but the superior athlete isn't always the superior player -- technique, mental toughness, strategy, etc. are critical factors to success as well.
     
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  12. Slicendicer

    Slicendicer Guest


    Who won the 1/4 final match today? Thankyou come again... you are ALMOST a parody of yourself... thanks again... :)
     
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  13. stormholloway

    stormholloway Legend

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    That's your argument? Whoever wins on one particular day? I mean, are you kidding me?

    Huh?

    I was talking to Slicendicer. I quoted what you said regarding their forehands and then returned to talking to him to make a comparison between your and his opinions.
     
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  14. chess9

    chess9 Hall of Fame

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    Someone asked Johnny Weismuller how he swam so fast. He said: "I don't know, I just put my hand in the water, and pull really hard." :)

    So, how much does process help the genetically gifted athlete? I'd say a damned lot. Just look at the way the pro game has evolved in the last 40 years. It ain't all strings and racquets. Better junior training, including stroke techniques, better physical training, better supplements, better medical care, better understanding of the importance of rest, etc.

    Process won't turn your average guy into a 6.0, but it might turn him into a 4.0 or maybe even a 4.5. Process is more important probably to the average player than it is to the pro, but he uses it less. :) You give a kid with top genetics an ounce of process and he will produce a ton of result. Give your average guy an ounce of process and you will get one tenth of an ounce of result. Kapish? So, the average player should be spending 10 hours a week practicing effectively (process) and 2 hours a week playing, IF he wants to improve.

    So, IMHO, process is very important. Tennis, particularly the serve, is not all natural motion. Johnny Weismuller didn't know it, but he had a natural tendency and ability to reach and subluxate his shoulder a lot, something most people don't have. (Reach and point your thumb down.) That was learned by people interested in PROCESS. The best teachers now teach the average kid how to swim fast by emulating what the best swimmers do and further refining it. As a result, the average USSA swimmer can probably hold 1 minute to 1:10 hundred yard times for 5 minutes or longer, something you didn't see just 40 years ago.

    Just my humble opinion, and I'm usually wrong.

    -Robert
     
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  15. J011yroger

    J011yroger G.O.A.T.

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    IT'S ALIIIIIVE!!!!!!!!

    J
     
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  16. J011yroger

    J011yroger G.O.A.T.

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    Welcome back bud.

    J
     
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  17. EikelBeiter

    EikelBeiter Professional

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    Do you mean stretch your arm out parallel to the ground and try and point your thumb down? if you can do that you can subluxate your shoulder? which is good thing?
     
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  18. wihamilton

    wihamilton Hall of Fame

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    Ah woops. My mistake. That's what happens when you causally read a thread.
     
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  19. Bud

    Bud Bionic Poster

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    What exactly is pat the dog position?
     
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  20. stormholloway

    stormholloway Legend

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    Equally my fault. I quoted you and then wrote "you," but was addressing the other guy.

    I agree with your analysis, in fact, and was using it to demonstrate my point: there is indeed something distinctly different in the way Federer, Nadal, and Verdasco hit their forehands.
     
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  21. Kobble

    Kobble Hall of Fame

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    You would think being revealed they would get their act together, but they have no shame. It takes time. I think it took me about a month of 8 sessions to get my forehand more cleaned up. Currently, in the mirror, I have pro strokes(like Malisse). I wonder what they look like on court. I have a tendency to arm it more when on court.
     
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  22. aimr75

    aimr75 Hall of Fame

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    thanks :)

    same thing happens to me, shadow hitting and practicing in front of a mirror, my strokes look pretty good, but changes and turn out different when faced with an incoming ball
     
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  23. J011yroger

    J011yroger G.O.A.T.

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    Funny how that works eh?

    Same thing on the serve, it is really easy when it is just you and the hopper of balls. Put someone on the other side of the net who is trying to beat you and all of the sudden, things start getting harder.

    J
     
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  24. aimr75

    aimr75 Hall of Fame

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    ^ yeah, funny how that thing between your ears can really mess up your game.. :)
     
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  25. J011yroger

    J011yroger G.O.A.T.

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    I just need a toggle switch for it. On in between points, and off after the third bounce of my pre service routine.

    I would be a force.

    J
     
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  26. drake

    drake Semi-Pro

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    Pat the Dog

    The Pat the Dog position is a great description utilized by the best forehands in todays game. Just watch pro matches, its that simple, Federer, Nadal, Murray, Verdasco and all the newcomers like Cilic, Dimitrov, Nishikori etc all utilize this on their fh groundstrokes. It is one of the trigger points to remember during a rally stroke to help close your racquet face for spin control while loading your legs at the same time. One thing to remember, unless you have great timing and/or it's a slow serve, you should not use this for forehand returns. You're better off with short stroke and more open face. You will not see this in the classic stroke, it is more often associated with fuller grips and it you're timing is off or late, you will shank the ball.
     
    Last edited: Mar 23, 2009
    #76
  27. Bungalo Bill

    Bungalo Bill G.O.A.T.

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    To everyone else.

    You do not have to use the "pat-the-dog" position in learning the forehand.

    In fact, there are several methods to learn the forehand and how it works.

    The main reason for the "pat the dog" step is because this is the transition point from a racquet that went back from the unit turn (and has gained momentum by a controlled but relaxed drop of the racquet) to the forward execution of the racquet.

    It is this place (or area) that some people struggle with (turning the wrist) and sometimes do not understand how their racquet needs to be positioned before they bring the racquet forward.

    The other important aspect of this part of the sequence is you as a coach get to see firsthand if they cross that imaginary line when the backswing would be considered excessive.

    By doing this, the player gets to register sensory information in the brain about how the racquet should be positioned, the wrist position, the hand position, the arm position, and where the racquet head is in general because at this point, the racquet head is BEHIND the player and is out of sight.

    If you don't think you need the "pat the dog" step that is fine. However, if you think something might not be right when your racquet moves to that dropped position or you feel a bit awkward in your wrist/hand as the racquet drops or if you feel you have an excessive backswing (going past the imaginary line), then this step not only provides you with excellent feedback but it also will help you remedy whatever troubles you.

    Here is the position we are talking about:

    [​IMG]

    From the unit turn when the racquet is still up high to the position shown by Nadal above, for many players a lot can happen concerning racquet head control and fluidity. Keeping the racquet on the same side of the body all happens within these two positions and therefore is the reason why I teach this area of the stroke and have two reference points to review, practice, and check.

    So in a nutshell, I have two reference/connection points to check for racquet prep and drop to ensure a smooth takeback and to help eliminate an excessive backswing and two reference/connection points to check for the contact and followthrough. Two of them are for the backswing and the other two for the forward swing. It is pretty simple.
     
    Last edited: Mar 23, 2009
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  28. Nellie

    Nellie Hall of Fame

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    BB. I also find that this position is really good for the kenetic chain by allowing the player to quickly rotate the hips to load the forearm muscles for maximizing racquet acceleration during the stroke. If I lead back with the elbow, like Roddick, my strokes get too loopy, and I end up hitting late.
     
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  29. morten

    morten Hall of Fame

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    don`t pat the dog, just nod and leave..
     
    #79
  30. drake

    drake Semi-Pro

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    I wanted to explain it this way but I was:

    1. Too Lazy
    2. Couldn't
    3. Didn't Care Enough

    I don't know how you do it BB, Kudos for the effort and explanation.
     
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  31. Bungalo Bill

    Bungalo Bill G.O.A.T.

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    Exactly.

    1. Kinetic chain

    2. Isolation

    3. Backswing

    4. Racquet position on drop

    On and on and on...
     
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  32. Bungalo Bill

    Bungalo Bill G.O.A.T.

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    lol, I dont either sometimes. I just get a bit ticked off when people chime in with nonsense thinking they are making sense. I guess if I didnt know any better, never studied the sport, or coached, I probably would buy a lot of the garbage posted here.
     
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  33. aimr75

    aimr75 Hall of Fame

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    BB, thanks for the explanations.. since i have been adopting this, i have noticed its becoming less apparant that i cross that imaginary line and i am dropping the racquet more so
     
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  34. Bungalo Bill

    Bungalo Bill G.O.A.T.

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    Yup, the goal is to head for fluidity. Only use the reference points to take note on what part of the swing needs to be fine-tuned. Eventually, you wont need the reference points and will simply know when things go astray.

    For instance, I dont use the reference points anymore and havent for ages. However, when I teach beginner or intermediates looking to improve their forehands I will.

    For me, if I am spraying my forehand, I will usually know what part of the swing I am losing some control on. Also, other aspects of the forehand such as overrotation, turning my head, distractions will also play a part.

    But for the most part those four positions I mentioned were engrained a long time ago. So with me, it is usually something else that is going wrong.

    Also, you dont have to be perfect with it all the time. The racquet position doesnt have to be perfectly flat over the ground. So dont get caught up in that too. Just drop the racquet to a position that is comfortable but generally correct.
     
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  35. aimr75

    aimr75 Hall of Fame

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    yeah, these positions are far from ingrained for me, i essentially think about what im doing on every forehand i hit.. and that also extends to my non-dominant arm, as i have issues there too.. but its a work in progress, and am enjoying the process..
     
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  36. Bungalo Bill

    Bungalo Bill G.O.A.T.

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    Yes, whatever approach you use (three step or four step), the goal with these approaches is to engrain a certain overall pattern in your swing. So, if you havent ever done this and just picked up a racket and just started to swing it, there is a chance you can develop akward movements in the motion which can hold you back on other steps as well.

    For instance, if you are used to taking a big cut at the ball brining your racquet head well beyond the imaginary line, this might also affect your racquet head control at the next reference point.
     
    #86
  37. Djokovicfan4life

    Djokovicfan4life Legend

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    Well, at least you're thinking about it. Most players never even get to that point. It's all about "doing what's natural", haha!

    I remember my "natural" forehand: shoulders completely open to net and racquet swinging forward with no low to high motion whatsoever. Backswing? Whazzat?
     
    #87
  38. aimr75

    aimr75 Hall of Fame

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    yeah same, if i did whats natural, my forehand would be all over the place..

    you may think you look like a pro trying to do what comes natural, until you see yourself on video :)
     
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  39. user92626

    user92626 Legend

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    I wanna ask BB or anyone who understand his point.

    How exactly do you turn your wrist upon dropping the racket? I didn't pay attention to this area before and I just let on what feels natural.
     
    #89
  40. phoenicks

    phoenicks Professional

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    that's very true, because when some beginner just pick up tennis and ask me about it, I often just do and demo for them to see, because this is extremely hard for me to explain in verbal terms, and a lot of the time, even when I demo and break up the process slowly for them to see, they can still get it wrong.

    Here's a question for you, BB,
    When a beginner is just starting to learn tennis, which approach is better?

    1) teach him to swing the ball while including details of hitting arm, wrist position, racquet face at contact point and follow through, but ignoring the unit tun, body rotation, and non-hitting arm out across a reference point to judge the incoming ball.

    2) teach hm all the detail, including hitting arm, wrist position, racquet face at contact point, unit turn, body rotation, and non-hitting arm out across a reference point to judge the incoming ball. But I notice when I tell a beginner all the details, he'll often forget most if not all of it.
     
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  41. J011yroger

    J011yroger G.O.A.T.

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    3) none of the above.

    J
     
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  42. Bungalo Bill

    Bungalo Bill G.O.A.T.

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    I dont know if this will answer question. When I teach the forehand to a beginner, I simply stay within the four step process. There is nothing more than that.

    However, within the four step process I am getting them to perform a unit turn, bending their knees a bit, and building fluidity within these steps.

    In other words, somethings are being consciously learned while others subconsciously learned.

    For example, when a player moves their racquet to first position, and they do it correctly, there is a high chance that his shoulders/unit turned. I engrain this position so that the brain learns how to get the racquet to this 1st position. Believe me, the brain is taking in everything subconsciously but you are not complicating it so that you confuse the learner consciously.

    You have to be very careful that you reduce frustration as much as possible. The more you raise frustration within the player, the more you increase your risk of shutting down the learning system both at the conscious and subconscious levels. You really have to guard against that and trust that the human body is learning the finer details as you move the player through the four or three step learning process.

    The different positions in the swing call for many muscle and body shape executions thoughout those three or four steps. I prefer not to focus on those details unless I absolutely have too. Still I will limit the details as much as possible.

    The three or four step process is designed to move the body in such a way that if all the steps are connected it promotes a fluid movement. Try to imagine one of those picture books. If I look at a picture one by one, I might be able to see some form of fluidity. However, if I flip through the pages real fast, the pictures take on a life of their own and you can see the fluidity in movement as you move through the picture book.

    In essence, that is exactly what you are doing with the three or four step process.

    I hope that helped.
     
    Last edited: Mar 31, 2009
    #92
  43. Bungalo Bill

    Bungalo Bill G.O.A.T.

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    In general, the palm side of the wrist faces the side fence at first position. First position is not ready position. From the first position, the wrist does not pronate or supinate with the forearm. Both the forearm and the wirst simply mvoe with the arm and end up facing down to the ground.

    Now, this is generally speaking. It is mostly the shoulder moving the entire arm from first position to second position and the forearm/wrist simply facing a different direction because of the movement of the entire arm.

    Geeez, I hope that made sense. If not, I will try to get a photo.
     
    Last edited: Mar 30, 2009
    #93
  44. user92626

    user92626 Legend

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    sigh, you lost me at "first position", bb

    Is that the racket pointing up (generally) position?

    I can't figure out why it is so hard to swing hard without making a mess of a shot.
     
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  45. Bungalo Bill

    Bungalo Bill G.O.A.T.

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    Well, I will be a contratrian here. You dont want to swing hard. You want to simply accelerate through the ball keeping your form and balance in the shot.

    Trying to overpower your opponent usually means you are trying to make up for deficiencies in your game. In other words, perhaps you dont move the ball around very well, have a tough time handling high balls, or different spins.

    When a player uses power to take precedent over consistency, placement, and depth, the player needs to stop and take a break to realize that the game of tennis is about reducing your errors and increasing the chances of your opponent to make an error.

    With this in mind, power becomes a support mechanism for your shots and plays a subordinate role compared to the other three mentioned above.

    FOUR STEP METHOD

    1. The first position is when you turn your shoulders (unit turn) and the tip of your racquet is pointing toward the sky as you bring yoru racquet back. Your non-dominant hand still is placed on the throat of the racquet. The hitting side of the racquet is generally pointing toward the side fence. You might have to adjust your wrist some to get the racquet position. dont worry about having it perfect. Remember this is a static position and in a normal fluid swing, the face of the racquet may not be perfectly facing the side fance.

    2. The second step simply lowers the racquet to the bottom of the racquet drop in the swing. This is the position right before you bring the racquet forward. The wrist (palm side) is usually facing down as is the hitting side of the racquet. To get here, moving your lower arm at the elbow will help do this. Obviously, you will have other parts of the body contributing to this. Throughout this entire phase, you should be relaxed.

    3. The next step is contact with the ball. Racquet is perpendicular to the ground and you meet the ball at your preferred contact point. Your angular momentum and rotation should send your swing into the ball. Keeping your head still, eyes focused, etc... are developed here.

    4. The next position is followthrough. You can use the "Catch the racquet" here if you want which is what I do mainly because it discourages overrotation. After the player learns what rotating feels like, then they can get a little more loose and followthrough without catching the racquet, etc...
     
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  46. user92626

    user92626 Legend

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    BB,

    Thank you and I appreciate all your answers. Could you explain further on these points:

    "You dont want to swing hard. You want to simply accelerate through the ball "

    Do you mean that I should start the forward swing motion generally at "normal" speed (my comfortable speed) then intentionally accelerate the speed thru the contact point? OR should I intentionally swing fast (to my best level) from begining to end of the forward swing motion?




    "1. ...Remember this is a static position ..."

    Does that mean I can linger for a few ms at this position?
     
    #96
  47. Bungalo Bill

    Bungalo Bill G.O.A.T.

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    When you get to position two, your racquet still has not come forward. So in essence, let's say for simplicity that your racquet is stopped. When you begin bringing your racquet forward, your angular momentum that should be sent towards the ball will cause the racquet to accelerate. You want the acceleration of the racquet coming forward to compliment your angular momentum (rotation) and not go ahead or too fast from it. The better you are able to balance yourself, arrive to the ball on time, prepare early, and get stronger, the faster you will be able to rotate and in essence accelerate the racquet and still be in control.

    As your rotation slows down, the arm and racquet that was accelerated shoud continue to accelerate through the ball and to followthrough.

    It is your body and angular momentum that helps accelerate the arm. You dont want to swing hard with just your arm or you will have to compensate or over compensate somewhere.


    What I meant is when a players is stationary (static) and is simply going through the four positions. When a player is in position one, the racquet is still and not moving (static).

    During a regular swing you will be passing through each of the positions and not stopping in any position. This is dynamic.
     
    #97
  48. user92626

    user92626 Legend

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    BB,

    I think one of my biggest confusions is that I do not know which segment of the FH sequence I need (to train) to focus exerting power in as far as power is concerned. IMO, I think there should be a central point/aspect of focus and everything else is just built around that.


    With that said, I imagine that I do everything *passively* such as takeback, racket drop, and then *only focus* on the forward swing motion -- make sure it's fast and timing. Is that a right thinking?
     
    #98
  49. Bungalo Bill

    Bungalo Bill G.O.A.T.

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    For using the momentum you have built up then it will definetly be at the second and third positions.

    The first position, simply prepares the racquet and as it is falling down to position two, you are still pretty much relaxed and your legs are starting to activate themselves in your forward swing. Same with your shoulder rotation and angular momentum. However, this assumes you have arrived to the ball on time, are positioned well, and are balanced.

    From position two to three is when you are going to accelerate through the ball and as long as you emphasize clean contact and good timing, power will happen.

    As far as a central focus, IMO the most important position is your contact with the ball which is position three or step three. Everything before that happens so that you can make clean contact and hit on time.

    However, the steps I mentioned are mainly for how your body should shape and move through the forehand stroke. Other supporting activities like your movement will play a role in the overall quality of your stroke when it is set in motion and placed under stress.

    The static positions are mainly for your swing. It helps you learn how your arm shapes and moves throughout the swing. Yes, you can do this in an open stance or neutral stance and also feel your balance etc..., but for many people, simply relaxing and and laying the racquet down in step two feels awkward and some struggle with the position their hand should be in etc...

    Without getting picky, that is pretty much what I do. :)

    When I am ready to bring the racquet forward, that is when the main emphasis on accelerating the racquet takes place. A balanced approach to bringing the racquet forward using your legs, rotation, torso, and good technique (head still, staying in balance, rotating into the ball, etc...) allows a smooth relaxed swing to move through the ball and back into recovery.

    If you try to get ahead of yourself and try to accelerate beyond the stability of your foundation or try to over accelerate one part of the motion, you might hit a few balls okay, but it is a recipe for disaster and inconsistent play.

    Power is a supporting role that is allowed to be set free because everything else is in its place. It is not a lead role which takes precedence over your balance, your movement, your rotation, etc... and your power mainly comes from making clean contact with the ball and meeting it on time not how much faster or harder you can swing. It is that "pop" you add to the ball that feels effortless and real real good.
     
    Last edited: Apr 3, 2009
    #99
  50. user92626

    user92626 Legend

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    Hi BB,

    Your recent post is very clear. I see that i have a quite a bit to change, like power. I'm used to thinking and using power as an imposing factor that dictates the quality of a shot and as well as the point in game. It's gonna be hard to change it to secondary.



    There was an elderly gent, 60+, that I met at a court a while ago who told me that tennis to him was like dancing. That explained to me how he hit with so much grace and fluidity and needless to mention power.
     

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