Question to experienced stringers

Discussion in 'Strings' started by ipitythefool, Aug 19, 2009.

  1. ipitythefool

    ipitythefool Semi-Pro

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    Well I went to a new stringer shop (not the one I usually go). Wanted to string my racquet at 63lbs. The stringer told me that it is not a wise thing to do, and he tells everyone that comes to his shop to string crosses 2 lbs less than the mains. Because, he said, if the crosses are too tight, it will make the racquet face smaller at 3 & 9. Even his customer in the shop told me the same.

    Now I dont know much about stringing, maybe he is right, but this just didn't make sense to me! I know that stringing both mains and crosses at same tension...most people do, I think! And I was never told something like this in a different stringer shop that I always go. But I just didn't know how to explain him that, it is not logical. (Or maybe I am wrong)
    As a matter of fact, at my usual stringer shop, on many instances I had higher tension on crosses than mains (when I have poly on mains and synthetic on crosses and that I want higher tension on crosses to take away from power)

    Btw- I live a developing country. None of these stringers are certified or anything.

    Does anyone have a suggestion?

    Thanks!
     
    #1
  2. Cfidave

    Cfidave Professional

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    I usually string crosses 3-5lbs higher then the mains, here is why: when pulling the main strings the racquet head will tend to round out slightly, that is to say the sides of the racquet will expand, and the top and bottom will compress. Stringing the crosses slightly tighter helps bring the racquet head back into shape. Secondly, there is more friction when stringing the crosses, since the mains are already installed. Again, stringing the crosses a little tighter helps even out the string bed tension. Hope that helps.
     
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  3. jonvdw

    jonvdw New User

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    Quite a few stringers string the mains tighter than the crosses. The reason for this is very simple: the mains have to span more distance, so they have to be tighter than the shorter crosses to get the same relative tension. It is also true that this increases the sweet spot. I usually string my mains at 26kg. and the crosses at 25kg. Whatever you do, it's always important not to have too much difference between the mains and the crosses. No more than 1kg. or 2lbs. difference is recommended.
     
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  4. tennisstrngdude

    tennisstrngdude New User

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    It is all a matter of preference. Frame deforming is a silly argument. No truth in it.
     
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  5. drakulie

    drakulie Talk Tennis Guru

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    find another stringer.
     
    #5
  6. ipitythefool

    ipitythefool Semi-Pro

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    :) I wish I could. There are only two stringers in a city of 1.5 million population.
     
    #6
  7. ipitythefool

    ipitythefool Semi-Pro

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    Well, what I tried to describe is exactly the opposite of what you described. The stringer is saying that, the crosses have to be less tighter than mains or it is no good.
     
    #7
  8. ipitythefool

    ipitythefool Semi-Pro

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    Well, this was explained to me as a must do thing to me. I read about A TON of people from these boards who straight out gets their racqs strung at any one given tension, eg. 60lbs, 25kg, 58lbs etc etc
     
    #8
  9. Supracool94

    Supracool94 Semi-Pro

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    You are the customer, thank the stringer for his suggestion and ask him to please string your racquet the way you want it!

    I always string the poly at a lower tension, rather it be the mains or crosses.
     
    #9
  10. drakulie

    drakulie Talk Tennis Guru

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    Ouch! :shock:

    In that case, take the advice offered by, Supracool.

    Good luck.
     
    #10
  11. rasajadad

    rasajadad Hall of Fame

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    You should get a machine and learn how. It sounds like you could pick up some cash. Plus, you wouldn't have to give your frames to strangers who may or may not know what they're doing.
     
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  12. Irvin

    Irvin G.O.A.T.

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    If the racket is mounted properly on a good machine I would agree with you. Stringing the crosses +/- 2 to 5 pounds either way won't make that much of a difference except for feel. And most players could not tell the difference in the feel.

    Irvin
     
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  13. Sephiroth619

    Sephiroth619 Rookie

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    Try stringing with a klippermate. I've warped a few racquets, so trust me there is such a thing as frame deformation.
     
    #13
  14. tennisstrngdude

    tennisstrngdude New User

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    Sorry. I was referring to real machines, not toy stringers.
     
    #14
  15. ipitythefool

    ipitythefool Semi-Pro

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    Yes, this is something I consider(ed). Then, will need to buy a machine at least comparable to two stringer shops (like a Prince 3000, which will cost a good $5000 with the customs tax!). But the thing is, stringing costs only like $5.20 per racquet (equivalent in U.S currency). Labor is so freaking cheap in developing countries, so I am not sure if it is worth it :) (But strings are expensive!) One funny thing, fake Babolats are considered norm here. So, I just deal with all the ******** and just school them on (few) courts there is :)
     
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  16. Virtua Tennis

    Virtua Tennis Semi-Pro

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    Here's what the USRSA says about tension.

    If you string your mains tighter than your crosses it will spread the sweet spot out at 3 and 9 o'clock of the racquet.

    If you string your crosses tighter than your mains it will spread the sweet spot up higher towards 12o'clock.

    There is no such thing as crosses must be looser than the mains. Hells some frames get bent out of shape when mains are tighter than crosses like the Head extreme. In fact I thought about applying pressure on the frame at 3 and 9 o'clock when stringing head extremes because of the large amount of flexing the frame takes.
     
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  17. ipitythefool

    ipitythefool Semi-Pro

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    Virtua Tennis, thanks for providing this info. I will go tell and "school" the stringer! But I don't want to say much, as I don't want him to jack up my racquets lol. Eventually I'd like to get a starter stringing machine and get rid of all this...
     
    #17
  18. pingu

    pingu Semi-Pro

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    I think that's what you should do. I and many others in this forum have been lucky with the "toy" stringers like Klippermate or Gamma X2 etc...
     
    #18
  19. LPShanet

    LPShanet Banned

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    If it's just 2 lbs of difference, it honestly won't matter. If you feel strongly, though, just tell him to do it anyway, even though it's not what he's suggesting. However, there are a few racquets (notably some Yonex models) that recommend you string the crosses 5% lower than the mains for various reasons. So the best course of action is to tell us what racquet you're using, and we can give you more detailed advice based on manufacturer recommendations.
     
    #19
  20. Steve Huff

    Steve Huff Legend

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    First, there is such thing as frame deformation, even on good machines. But, to the original poster. There are a multitude of things to look at when stringing a racket. 1) Yonex recommends stringing the crosses at 5% lower tension than the mains. So, if it's a Yonex, may want to follow his advice. 2) Some people prefer to string the crosses lower because the string itself is shorter, so there's less length to stretch. So, to get the same angle of deflection, they string the crosses lower. 3) The crosses lose tension due to friction when stringing. They also cause the mains to tighten by moving them physically out of their straight line. So, they string the crosses tighter than the mains. 4) Some strings stretch less than others. In your case, you have a poly in the mains, a more elastic synthetic in the crosses. Since the synthetic stretches more, some stringers would string it tighter than the poly. 5) Others say that poly loses tension so fast that they string it tighter than the synthetic. 6) Some frames do deform more than others. One poster says they won't with a good machine. Well, they don't until you pull them off the machine. That's why some frames are difficult to get off the 6 and 12 mounting posts--their design allows them to deform. With these, a stringer might want to string the crosses tighter than the mains to keep the original shape of the racket head.
    After all this, the real only thing to do is try it different ways to see what plays best. There is some truth in every theory here, so none is really right or wrong.
     
    #20

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