racket face slightly closed on groundies, should it be less closed on returns?

Discussion in 'Tennis Tips/Instruction' started by 2ndServe, Sep 24, 2012.

  1. 2ndServe

    2ndServe Professional

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    should the racket face be a little less closed on the return as opposed to being slightly closed on groundstrokes.
     
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  2. spaceman_spiff

    spaceman_spiff Hall of Fame

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    I'd say yes. Going for heavy spin on a fast incoming serve can lead to a lot of mis-hits. A slightly flatter drive with a shorter swing is a much higher-percentage shot as long as you're not going for too much power. That's because the frame spends more time in the hitting zone when you're driving through the ball as opposed to brushing up the back of it.

    So, shoulder turn, short backswing, and drive through the ball with just a bit of topspin.
     
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  3. FrisbeeFool

    FrisbeeFool Rookie

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    i think you should do it by feel, not worrying at all about how closed your racket face is. When you're first learning your basic strokes, you will learn what the contact point should look and feel like, and how your racket face should be oriented. If you're trying to calculate the angle of the racket face while you swing, it will mess up your timing and create errors.

    Try to use an even more abbreviated and compact takeback than you would on a normal groundstroke. At contact the racket head will look exactly the same as it does on a normal groundstroke.

    That's for topspin shots. On slices i haven't really thought about it. Hard to say. I think most people do it by feel
     
    Last edited: Sep 25, 2012
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  4. Limpinhitter

    Limpinhitter Legend

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    I don't think it's helpful to focus on that. If you are going for a topspin return, and the ball is above waist height at contact, then you will probably have a slightly close racquet face at contact, even if you are taking an abbreviated backswing. If you are blocking a high ball back or coming down on the ball, it probably won't be closed at all. But, again, IMO, you should be focusing on making clean contact, not the precise angle of your racquet face.
     
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  5. Power Player

    Power Player Talk Tennis Guru

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    I shank returns going big sometimes on them. So now what I try to do on returns is not worry about the racquet face and focus on a super compact return with my elbow close to my body. You would be amazed at how much leverage you can get for very deep attacking returns.
     
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  6. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    Compact short stoke with full shoulder turn, if possible.
    As for closed face, I think it's more important to hit a slower, more topspin ball on return of medium speed serves than for groundies. Top gives you margin for error, as it's hard to control ball height when returning serves.
    Fast serves, use volley stroke.
    Slow serves, wind up and hit it like a groundie.
     
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  7. 2ndServe

    2ndServe Professional

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    this is more in reference to doubles returns. Can't really roll those over.
     
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  8. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    Need the top to return serve in high level doubles. Few return with slice. Don't roll over. Hit with closed face. Swing low to high, but don't loop it 8' above the net, either.
     
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  9. spaceman_spiff

    spaceman_spiff Hall of Fame

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    It's the same as a driven return in singles only aiming lower.

    Drive through the ball with just a little bit of topspin on it and aim about a foot or so over the net so that the return lands around the service line (forcing the server to pick the ball up off his feet).

    Going for big topspin will lead to loads of mishits on fast serves because the timing is so difficult. Slicing back can cause some problems if you can't keep it low and away from the net man (slices travel in a much straighter trajectory and are easier to put away with a poach if they're too high above the net).
     
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  10. 5263

    5263 G.O.A.T.

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    Limpin as usual is got it here and I do think if anything, the face is more closed...
    Slightly... on rtn of real big serves, as they are rising with power when you rec
    them and the slight close helps to control that. Observe the short backswings
    suggestions you hear from several posters here as well.

    on avg second serves...you can treat those like a routine groundstroke or even
    more aggressive since they must be a bit short to make the box. Few use much
    power on second serve.
     
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