Racquet for 10 y.o. beginner

Discussion in 'Racquets' started by woodmo, Sep 20, 2007.

  1. woodmo

    woodmo New User

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    My son who is about to turn 10 has shown an interest in tennis and I want to get him a racquet for his birthday. He is about 55 inches tall and he has hit some with a larger racquet but had to use 2 hands on both sides. I was trying to choose between a 25 and 26 inch racquet, but I think I had decided on the Prince Shark 26" so it will give him plenty of racquet to grow into. I would appreciate any suggestions on other racquets or feedback about this one. Thanks in advance.
     
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  2. Jonny S&V

    Jonny S&V Hall of Fame

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    Well, I've always suggested that you start them off with a racquet that they can use their entire life. There is a 10 yr old in town who, even though he is a prodigy and is a pretty meaty (not fat, a lot of muscle though), has used the Prince Original Graphite Mid since he was 8. Not saying that he should jump right onto something that heavy, but if you are able to teach him proper technique, why not give him something that is good for all levels?

    EDIT: Just read that your son uses 2 hands on both sides. The boy I am talking about has a 1 hander, so the weight issue isn't quite as big. Is your son athletic?
     
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  3. woodmo

    woodmo New User

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    He's starting to become more athletic, but he not one of these naturals. The reason that he has used 2 hands on the forehand is that the racquet he was using was just too big, which is why I want to get him a jr. racquet. He's tall for his age, but not big and strong.
     
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  4. Jonny S&V

    Jonny S&V Hall of Fame

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    Well then, any of the junior racquets from Wilson or Babolat are really good, also if you can find any of the Wilson Hammers, the 6.3 is a good racquet.
     
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  5. rooski

    rooski Professional

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    Head Junior Radical. It's made like an adult racket in terms of quality but it's of course shorter (25") and lighter (9 oz).
     
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  6. Old_Crow

    Old_Crow Rookie

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    Junior Radical is 26" and 10.3oz. My son started with one and it's one of the heavier junior racquets. The Jr Instinct or Extreme might be a better choice among the Head line.

    A better option might be the Wilson nFury MP. Full size but very light and very flexy. It's what the pro in the junior's program recommends and what his 10yo son uses. Makes for an easier transition to adult racquets.

    http://www.tennis-warehouse.com/descpageRCWILSON-NFURY.html
     
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  7. Jonny S&V

    Jonny S&V Hall of Fame

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    Forgot about the Nfury, good find. That is probably one of the best beginner racquets out there.
     
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  8. HyperHorse

    HyperHorse Banned

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    Just get him something basic and something that isn't too heavy or too light.
    Having said that, I started playing when i was 9 yrs old.
    Never used a junior racquet.
    Never needed to hit with 2 hands from both sides...
    So.. maybe you need to feed your son better.
    I would suggest letting him playtest as many racquets as possible, and seeing what he likes.
    I would assume he's old enough for a full sized racquet, but then I might be wrong.
     
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  9. Bud

    Bud Bionic Poster

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    K90

    K90 with lead at 10 and 2 :p
     
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  10. meowmix

    meowmix Hall of Fame

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    Yeah, if you want to turn him off from tennis forever! :grin:

    The nFury's a great choice. You might want to start him off with the OS though, let him be able to hit the sweet spot more often (and therefore enjoy the experience more).

    Personally, I would shy away from the junior racquets for the reason that they are about as expensive as some of the liquidation racquets. Plus, your son will outgrow the junior racquets in a year or two. I think you probably want to order for him an "adult" racquet, but keep the grip size to 4 1/8. That way, he'll be able to use it for a while.

    Hope this helps
     
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  11. Pleepers

    Pleepers Professional

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    Jonny S&V, that's got to be the worst advice I have ever read concerning a racquet for a young child. That racquet is good for only a select few of adults -let alone a young child. The weight will put a lot of strain on the child's back and will prevent proper form development because the the racquet is too heavy for a kid to swing properly.

    Like people have mentioned a 26' Head frame would be the highest quality and best fit for the strength and playing level of your son.
     
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  12. quest01

    quest01 Hall of Fame

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    Yes maybe in 15 years when he becomes a 5.0 player.
     
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  13. TheShaun

    TheShaun Hall of Fame

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    i know that sporting good aren't cheap and that kids grow like crazy, but i have seen too many kids be the victim of "growing in to it". and myself am the victim of it. half of my hockey equipment is from when i was 14-15 i'm 26 now, skates included. i just don't have to wear three pairs of socks anymore. my point, get the right racquet for your son, if you get him something that he can't handle then he won't enjoy it. go and see if there's a used sporting goods store or consignment store in your area, that will ease the pain in the wallet. and i may be wrong but, i'm not sure that jr. racquets even have the same technologies as the sr. models. maybe someone can confirm that.
     
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  14. anirut

    anirut Legend

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    I'd suggest you get him a junior racket.

    An easy measurement would be to let him stand straight with his arms by the side. The right racket for him would be one that, with the head pointing down, you son should be able to grab the handle at the right position -- neither right at the middle of the grip nor way out at the butt cap -- you know what I mean.

    Forget about letting him grow into his equipment. Since he's just starting, just concentrate on proper stroke production and forms. A racket too big will make it difficult (and probably not so enjoyable as being so awkward) to learn.

    Once he's got things right, that means he'd know the proper way to play with a racket. By the time he develops that muscle memory, he'll out-grow the racket, and stronger, and would probably be ready to move on to something better.

    Junior rackets are cheap. Don't worry about the technology or anything. (We all know it's BS.) Get something right for his size, in the design and color that he likes. It's a good investment that will help him develop a long-term enjoyment in the sport.

    Hope this helps.
     
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  15. PimpMyGame

    PimpMyGame Hall of Fame

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    My son is nearly 10 and uses the 26" Pro Staff, recently moving from a 25". Don't know about other junior rackets, but the only difference between the 25" and 26" was the handle length - the rackets from bottom of throat through to the hoop were identical. Kind of made it easier to move up a size.

    The 26" PS retails for about £50 in the UK and I will have to get my son a full size in about 12-18 months. If you're worried about the cost, give up now - £50 is nothing in comparison to cost of lessons, travelling to tournaments and so on. Not to mention that he gets through his tennis shoes and clothing quicker than frames. Almost forgot, he loses his baseball hats with monotonous regularity so there's another tenner once in a while.

    Just as well he doesn't break strings yet. lol.
     
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  16. boilerfan

    boilerfan New User

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    Head Jr racquets or something like Bandid

    The Head junior racquets are a good idea. I personally fall in the category of thinking it is a good idea to use a regular sized racquet, but something on the light side like the Prince Bandit. The oversize strung weight is only 9.9 ounces which he should be able to handle and use for a few years. Depending on growth spurts, he might outgrow a junior racquet soon.
     
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  17. Voltron

    Voltron Hall of Fame

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    Pffft, like I'd know
    Maybe we can get Andres to give up one of the PC600s... :lol:
     
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  18. Jonny S&V

    Jonny S&V Hall of Fame

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    Tell that to kids that grew up with wood racquets...
     
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  19. Pleepers

    Pleepers Professional

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    No problem. Because technology sucked 40 years ago compared to today's standard. You don't live in the past... Do you?
     
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  20. Jonny S&V

    Jonny S&V Hall of Fame

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    Not really, racquets today have more power then the wooden racquets of a while ago, so why shouldn't they use a heavy racquet? If they learn proper technique, they'll be fine, but if they don't, why should the OP even be asking for a decent racquet to buy.
     
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  21. Pleepers

    Pleepers Professional

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    ummm, because heavy racquets are....heavy? And if the little guy can't even hold the racquet, let alone swing it, he will never learn proper technique. Plus it will be very strainfull to his back and muscles.
     
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  22. HyperHorse

    HyperHorse Banned

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    What the hell are you feeding your son?
    I was around 143cms when i was 7.
     
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  23. Pro_Tour_630

    Pro_Tour_630 Legend

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  24. HEAD/PRINCE RULE

    HEAD/PRINCE RULE Rookie

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    A pog os or a head agassi radical with big banger mains and pro red code 17 crosses. lead at 12 and 9 lead in handle. Then 2 tourna grips.
     
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  25. snoflewis

    snoflewis Hall of Fame

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    i got my 12 year old sister who's pretty weak a pure storm. easy to hit w/, easy to swing, decent power...she hits well with it. i didnt want to get her something too big so she could actually focus on hitting cleanly
     
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  26. Willy H.

    Willy H. New User

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    junior pure drive team
     
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  27. bubbatex

    bubbatex Rookie

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    I am digging this up as I have a 10 year old and all I have for him right now is a Wilson Triad which is 4pts hh. He definitely is not swinging it good. I am looking at the Jr nBlade, Head Flexpoint and the Prince Shark - all 26". The Flexpoint seems to fit the bill except it is 10.3 ounces. Is that too heavy?
     
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