racquet size & age

Discussion in 'Racquets' started by papa, Nov 27, 2006.

  1. papa

    papa Hall of Fame

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    Along with many others I've tried to keep some semblence of my game by changing to larger racquets and different strings - type and tensions. However, I find myself playing worse with these new combinations - or think I am. Presently, I'm using the O3 blue with big banger at 55#'s but the ball is really starting to fly on me. Gets into your mind and all of sudden your not stroking the ball right trying to keep it in the court. The "blue" is a little less than 110 inches and I find it difficult to take a good swing because of the power in the racquet.

    Although I'm probably old enough to have invented tennis, I still prefer to swing hard and wonder if others have found the same problem and what they have done to take some of the power out of these new sticks. I went up from the mid-size Prince T3 which is around 100 square inches - maybe I should not have changed.

    Comments.
     
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  2. Voltron

    Voltron Hall of Fame

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    Pffft, like I'd know
    Umm, try the Yonex RDS 001 MP or RDX MP, or maybe a POG OS.
     
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  3. Ripper

    Ripper Hall of Fame

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    I don't agree with that you NEED to change to larger (or whatever) raquets because of age.
     
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  4. papa

    papa Hall of Fame

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    Well, thats not a bad idea (POG OS). Have a couple of them which I tried a few years back. Maybe I'll get them restrung. Actually played with the POG at one time and liked it but wasn't wild about the OS - maybe I had it strung too tight.

     
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  5. Midlife crisis

    Midlife crisis Hall of Fame

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    I'm 45, and I took up tennis again early last year after about a 15 year period when I probably played no more than 30 times all together. About five years ago, on a whim, I went to a Big 5 store and bought a Prince Triple Threat Rip just to have something to hit with other than my Wilson Ultra II Midsize, about an 80 sq. in. frame that I last used in the early 80's.

    I now use the newer version of that, the Prince Thunder Rip, which at 115 sq. in. and about 9.8 ounces, is squarely in the middle of granny stick territory. As I've played more, I've gravitated back towards the racquet swing weights I used to use, so I now have it at about 12 1/2 ounces and about 6 points HL, with a swingweight of about 370. Unfortunately, this means that this racquet is about as powerful as they come, which was as much of a problem for me as much as for you.

    I initially tamed the power by weighting down the handle a lot, as much as 2 1/2 ounces right at the bottom of the butt cap. That worked but made for a racquet that didn't do all things well. Gradually, I went to lower and lower powered strings, higher and higher tensions, and have more evenly distributed the weight of my frame. This works better, and I've found a string, Kirschbaum P2, which is pretty low powered but offers me the consistency of response that I love.

    So, stick with it and keep trying. If you fundamentally like your frame, it's not hard to make it do what you want it to do.
     
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  6. papa

    papa Hall of Fame

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    Great ideas - thanks. I'll take a look at Kirchbaum string, it might help.
     
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  7. arizonatennis

    arizonatennis New User

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    I play in a 4.0 55+ league, I see everyone using from 95 to 120 --the head size doesn't matter, it what feels comfortable to you. :)
     
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  8. sureshs

    sureshs Bionic Poster

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    Rackets, like people, also age. Other than the obvious scratches and faded paint, carbon fibers break down with use and make the frame more flexible.
     
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  9. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    I rotate thru racket's from 95 sq in to 110.
    I find there is often less power with the 110, 107, or 105's, especially when I"m swinging fast and free, like forehands and first serves.
    I find more power in the 100's, probably because they are the stiff rackets, 68-72 in RA (Aero500 and F5T's. That's for fast swings.
    For blocking swings, volley type and slow, I find more power with the big rackets, balanced by less power when I try to swing fast.
    If big racket's really did have more power for fast swings, wouldn't more of the ATP use them? Those guys swing much faster than I can dream of swinging, yet they use mostly 95-100's.
     
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  10. Shroud

    Shroud Legend

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    First off it you are more ancient than LeeD I would be shocked but do you hit flat mostly? Or is topspin your friend? If you are a flat hitter or have old school strokes then yeah a larger frame will be hard to control or tame from a power standpoint. So learn some topspin or if you are a spinner focus on getting even more.

    i cant think of a more powerful frame than the one I am using given the 400SW but sub 360g weight and 70 RA. I have to string it super tight with kevlar/ poly or recently kev 17g/kev18g at 86/80lbs. So tension is your friend and FWIW 55lbs in a 110" is the same as 46 lbs in midsize under 95" racket. So I would up the tension for sure and get a stiffer string.

    And it could just be that the BB is finished and its time to restring.
     
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  11. fuzz nation

    fuzz nation Legend

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    It sounds to me like you may want to consider a couple of rounds of demos from TW, just to sample some different gear and see what you get when playing with this or that. Also keep a notebook handy so that you can keep track of the impressions you find. Those notes can eventually indicate some likes and dislikes among your samplings.

    I'm not surprised to hear that you've got the ball taking flight on you with your current setup and I'm not wild about the idea of needing to string your racquet with a lower powered string to get it under control. I think that's a gamble - it may make the racquet play more harsh and also push you to overswing more often. That can mean more potential for wear and tear.

    If you like to swing hard and you need some control, I think you could benefit from something with moderate flex, enough weight to be able to plow through the ball with some authority, and also a somewhat smaller hoop. You'll probably find that a less expansive string bed gives you a more controllable "trampoline" to work with compared to the O3 Blue. Something as simple as Prince's O3 White LS could be worth a try.

    I'm not going to say that you need to play with a bludgeon of a racquet, but that O3 Blue is sort of an oversized flyswatter, at least in my opinion. I'm a fan of Volkl gear, so I'll suggest a look at perhaps their V1 or the Super G 10 295g. The Wilson Blade 104 is interesting because its hoop is somewhat large, but it also has substantial flex, which may give it the control you want when you take full swings.

    Trials with different frames having more or less flex, lighter or heavier layups, etc. may give you a fresh perspective. You might be most comfortable with a relatively light racquet, but you might also get some help from something with a little extra heft. Even though we can't control what sort of string setups come installed in different demos, there's no substitute for getting different racquets out for a test drive just to see how they behave in action.
     
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  12. Christian Olsson

    Christian Olsson Semi-Pro

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    If you hit fairly flat with not much topspin I would recommend to play test (demo) some mid sized frames. For me hitting flat with anything bigger than a 98 is harder. I'm 45 years old so I'm in between the modern game and old school. I would look at maybe a Volkl powerbridge 10 mid (93 sq inch), something flexy with lots of feel and precision with lots of control. Preferably headlight and with some swing weight. Or maybe demo the Volkl SUper G 10-325. Then you can string it with a softer string and not get flyers. I totally get your dilemma, many racquets today are lighter and stiffer and not meant for people like us. :) But the racquets as mentioned should work with your style. PS tried a pure drive and aero pro drive and couldn't get my strokes to gel with it.

    Now I just presume your style is a lot like the terrific Granville at tennis warehouse, I apologise if that is not the case.


    Völkl super g 10 295 (now 330 g with og and dampener) in search for string..
     
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  13. Shroud

    Shroud Legend

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    My 2 cents is that if you hit flat but want to gel with a bigger frame to combat age or have an old school game style lacking topspin, look to have a string bed that locks. It will lower the launch angle and that will help with control. Crosses to use would be syngut, natural guy, nylon, or kevlar, or even some of the Ashaway zx like blue dynamaite. Should help with the flying.

    So maybe those Aeros would work but my bet is if they were demos they were strung with poly and had a higher launch angle.
     
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