Racquet size seven year old girl

Discussion in 'Racquets' started by tennis_pr0, Mar 2, 2013.

  1. tennis_pr0

    tennis_pr0 Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Aug 4, 2009
    Messages:
    562
    I am a coach and teach many young kids. Usually, for my seven year olds, I have them playing with 25 inch racquets, but one of my students, who has very well developed strokes, is 54 inches and weighs 75 pounds (so realistically she is the same size as an average size 10 year old girl) I have her playing with a light 27 inch racquet.

    I had a debate with another coach about this, and he strongly stated that this was not a good idea, but my rebuttal was that she is very big for her age, has great technique, and would benefit much more from a full size racquet.

    Was just curious if any other coaches or parents had any feedback on this. Thanks.
     
    #1
  2. DustinW

    DustinW Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2007
    Messages:
    721
    Location:
    USA
    I'm not a coach, but I have 2 kids ages 8 and 10 that play. I'm a firm believer that kids should be playing with the heaviest racket that they can handle. My daughter is 8 and has been playing with a 26" frame for about a year now. She's almost ready to move to a full size frame but she is small for her age, so I'm holding off for a little while longer.

    I hate seeing kids out there using frames that are too small. IMO, heavier frames promote good mechanics (longer, more controlled ground strokes)... instead of just slapping at it with a shorter frame.
     
    #2
  3. tennis_pr0

    tennis_pr0 Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Aug 4, 2009
    Messages:
    562
    I agree with you that they should be playing with bigger racquets if they can handle it. The seven year old I am talking about is actually 75 pounds, very muscular for her age and 55 inches. So she is basically as big as a 10 year old, and like I said, I have her playing with a 27 inch racquet because anything smaller wouldn't do her justice. I was just curious of some other opinions out there about a girl who is 75 pounds and 54 inches with good strikes if anyone think s she shouldn't be playing with a full size racquet.
     
    #3
  4. Dave M

    Dave M Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2007
    Messages:
    1,941
    Location:
    England
    Don't see a problem with it, i quite dislike this theory that there can be a chart for each player saying at this age use this etc.
    Work with the individual and what they need.
     
    #4
  5. corners

    corners Legend

    Joined:
    Jul 31, 2008
    Messages:
    5,441
    Ken Rosewall learned with cut-off racquets. End of story, in my book.
     
    #5
  6. gameboy

    gameboy Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2009
    Messages:
    1,620
    If she is comfortable with it, I would let her play with the full racquet. My daughter switched when she was 10, but there are other girls who are much bigger who could have easily switched to an adult racquet earlier.
     
    #6
  7. tennis_pr0

    tennis_pr0 Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Aug 4, 2009
    Messages:
    562
    Yeah, like I said, she is 75 pounds and 54 inches tall already, and strong
     
    #7
  8. hrstrat57

    hrstrat57 Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2007
    Messages:
    1,722
    Location:
    RI
    If she hits the ball clean with good technique and is happy (that's the most important part) I can't see an issue.

    FWIW I coached 2 of my kids to D 3 tennis and at that age they were both hitting the same Prince Graphite 26" jr frame but moved on to 27" shortly. My son moved on the Wilson Ceramic 85 and then PS 85 next and if I recall correctly my daughter moved to Yonex SRQ 500 which she bagged until a couple of years ago.

    If she's hitting clean and is smiling IMHO tune the other guys out.
     
    #8
  9. tennis_pr0

    tennis_pr0 Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Aug 4, 2009
    Messages:
    562
    This was just a conversation I had with a teaching pro friend of mine, I assured him he was wrong, and I told him I would start a thread on here and see the replies
     
    #9

Share This Page