racquet v strings in terms of TE

Discussion in 'Racquets' started by achokshi99, Aug 21, 2011.

  1. achokshi99

    achokshi99 Rookie

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    What is the dominant factor in TE development - racquet or strings. I have bad TE due to prob using the most idiotic set up the roddick pdgt and a full bed of poly ranging from msv fh, cyberblue, and bhb around 50lbs. When I am loaded with motrin and have had a few days off you can do a lot with this setup and a live arm. I have asked for roddick substitutes that are arm friendly and will give a few of the suggestions a shot in demos but a lot of people insist on dropping poly. I have used multi and done for them. This has made me wonder what the dominantfactor in TE. Can a pro kennex have a full bed of poly and be worse than somerubber stiff racquet with gut?
     
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  2. Buckethead

    Buckethead Banned

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    I'd say it is many factors together:
    1-technique
    2-stiff racket with lower quality
    3-stiff string
    4-high tension
    5-not being fit to play tennis(your muscles need some work out and strengthening)
    First thing I'd do is rest for 10 days.
    Then first buy a quality racket, go for Yonex RDiS 200, great racket, comfortable,... then I'd use the same string you use now on this racket, so you could really see the difference between the 2 rackets, second, if it still persists then you should use natural gut around 55LBS until you are cured, to them go back to poly/soft multi hybrid.
     
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  3. TennisMaverick

    TennisMaverick Banned

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    You have to string within your best playability parameters, which means that there are going to be frames which aggravate your TE, no matter what you put in them.
     
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  4. mikeler

    mikeler G.O.A.T.

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    There are also polys that even when put in a Pro Kennex can hurt your arm. Start with the string change since it is cheaper and then switch to an arm friendly racket if you need to.
     
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  5. TennisMaverick

    TennisMaverick Banned

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    "You have to string within your best playability parameters"

    Covered that point in this part of the statement. "Playability parameters" includes string type, by definition.
     
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  6. fuzz nation

    fuzz nation Legend

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    One of my stronger hitting pals blew up his arm with tennis elbow after switching to a poly hybrid in his PD Roddick's. This guy is a stronger player with some college tennis experience and solid technique. He healed up, did some rehab, and got back to the game, but kept his racquets. He dropped the poly and got into natural gut. Since the return and string switch, he's had no new symptoms. He has a couple of the Roddick GT's now and uses full natural gut in those, too.

    I've also seen some strong players blow up their arms while using poly in what would be considered as rather arm-friendly frames, too. My belief is that the strings are the greater potential irritating factor on the arm than a stiff racquet, but I think that the harshness factor goes up when the flex ratings climb beyond the low-mid 60's.
     
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  7. TennisMaverick

    TennisMaverick Banned

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    What seems to escape many is that poly is designed for those who do not pressure the ball. It is specifically for hitting spin. That is why few women players use poly at all, and why few men players use full poly. Most male players hybrid, except for dirt kicking animals who it with massive spin. Glancing swing patterns put less stress on the joints, and work more in-line with the design of the shoulder's ball-n-socket joint and the elbow.
     
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  8. mikeler

    mikeler G.O.A.T.

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    Oops, should have read your post more closely.
     
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  9. SVP

    SVP Rookie

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    Playability parameters Let me try to translate into plain English here: are you saying that the type of string one chooses depends on the type and level of player one is? And that on the other hand, with some racquets, it doesn't matter what type of string you put in them, they'll harm your arm, elbow, shoulder etc. just by virtue of the racquet's charqacteristics? Because to me it sounds like you're saying that both string and racquet are equally important to injury issues, which makes sense. I believe Mikeler's point was that string choice is an important factor in elbow issues and that the OP should experiment with strings since strings are cheaper than racquets for the most part.
     
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  10. SVP

    SVP Rookie

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    Nothing wrong with reiterating a point, especially if you do it in plain English.
     
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  11. What are glancing swing patterns?
     
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  12. TennisMaverick

    TennisMaverick Banned

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    When you re-direct the force of the oncoming ball, hitting across it to apply spin, or attempting to follow the ball's circumference with the plane of the racquet face.
     
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  13. TennisMaverick

    TennisMaverick Banned

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    Alert: DNFTT!!!
     
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  14. bad_call

    bad_call Legend

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    do not pressure the ball? ...Nalbandian might disagree as others.
     
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  15. TennisMaverick

    TennisMaverick Banned

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    I would agree...he's one of the exceptions. Check-out the current Top 50 list and what they are stringing with. Few are stringing full poly. And Nalbandian is one of the beefier players out there, with technique which is really flawless off the ground. It's tough to pound him.
     
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  16. bad_call

    bad_call Legend

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    2 others that come to mind (ball pounders) are Davydenko and David Ferrer...both use full poly i think. probably more that i wouldn't want to meet in the 1st round. :)
     
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  17. bad_call

    bad_call Legend

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    to add to the "pressure" players using poly - Tsonga, Del Potro, Soderling.
     
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  18. Avadia

    Avadia Rookie

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    Poly is designed to do more than just provide spin. It is also designed for durability and for taming power in the stringbed. I think pros use it because control (and not just spin) is so important to them. They need to be able to swing out and not have their shots fly long. Many of them hybrid with gut because a full bed of poly lacks feel for touch shots and may damp the power too much.

    Personally, I prefer a gut/poly hybrid for the great combination of power, control, feel, and spin that it provides. But poly is stiff and even in a hybrid setup it can aggravate your elbow.
     
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  19. Steve Huff

    Steve Huff Legend

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    Back to the point, I'm going to agree with FuzzNation. I think the string makes the most difference to arm safety.
     
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  20. netguy

    netguy Semi-Pro

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    There is no string/tension/racquet combo in the world that can prevent you from getting TE in the long run if your technique has flaws.

    Don't blame your equipment, look at your technique with the help of a good coach if you want to enjoy tennis for years to come.
     
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  21. jwbarrientos

    jwbarrientos Hall of Fame

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    Brilliant, I'd add icing, brace....
     
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