Raising a tennis playing kid

Discussion in 'Junior League & Tournament Talk' started by Flat Top, Nov 5, 2011.

  1. Number1Coach

    Number1Coach Banned

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    Just to give you and idea they traded on the baseline games forehand drill 11/9 FK 11/8 DB backhand drill DB won both 7/4 and 7/5

    He played another player top 300 in the world beat him in a set, although it did go to a tie break 7/3 DB

    So my thought always need to improve but right on target . Heck I heard Nadal talking about still trying to improve.

    My thought on his tightness/rigid rotation is he is spending to much time in the ring training and this is causing a riff in the family the parents disagree on what sports he does but thats another subject.
     
    Last edited: Nov 15, 2011
  2. Pro_Tour_630

    Pro_Tour_630 Legend

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    DB non dominant arm does have a slight hicup. I do like his BH, he strikes the ball clean for a soon to be 16 year old.

    BTW TCF we stopped USTA tournaments and Clinics. Every time we train on form, technique/footwork breaks down in clinics and tournaments and we have to start all over again. We are doing three 1:30 hour privates per week of tennis and few hours of cross training and fitness which is getting to be very expensive. Not sure how long I can sustain this. Green ball is coming to an end.
     
    Last edited: Nov 15, 2011
  3. widmerpool

    widmerpool Rookie

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  4. TennisCoachFLA

    TennisCoachFLA Banned

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    I hear you, the costs add up and accelerate as they get older. It is frustrating in regards to drills vs tournaments. Most kids in this age group hit one way with the coach working them and another way when they are on their own.
     
  5. chalkflewup

    chalkflewup Hall of Fame

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    So glad I learned early not to let my kid get consumed with rankings. In my opinion, it's a detriment to player development in the U.S.
     
  6. Tennis_Bum

    Tennis_Bum Professional

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    Okay dad, I'll watch for the kid on Thanksgiving day. I must give you credit because you know how to get around. You are good at promoting your kid. That is something that many people here can't do.
     
  7. Number1Coach

    Number1Coach Banned

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    Well let's see is Mr. B smarter then all the posters on the board and able to make no cash transactions and have his kid flown all around the country or is there potential here people who are in the business are interested in ?
     
  8. Number1Coach

    Number1Coach Banned

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    You are correct Jr. Rankings do not matter .
     
  9. TennisCoachFLA

    TennisCoachFLA Banned

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    I have said that all along, credit to BB. He has gotten the boy a ton of attention, lessons, hits with pros, etc. Great job in that regard.

    But I maintain that college is the best plan when looking at his results and videos. Nothing wrong with a few extra years to let him grow into his frame.
     
  10. BMC9670

    BMC9670 Hall of Fame

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    No cash transactions? Come on. You never pay tournament entry fees? Travel costs? Court time? Nothing? What about the news story of selling your house and moving into your mother-in-law's trailer to support the tennis. Where did that cash go? Or was that just publicity for the cameras? What about the "message therapist" you claim to be for "team Baughman"? If that's not just a message board alter ego then are you working for free? Is the rest of the "team" working for free?

    The kid is a good player and I hope he goes far, but you're just full of contradictions.
     
  11. Soianka

    Soianka Hall of Fame

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    I think he is saying that the family never paid for the trips to other academies and to hit with pro players.

    I am sure they still need money to fund shoes, strings, racquets, tournament entry fees, clothes, etc.
     
  12. Number1Coach

    Number1Coach Banned

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    ding ding ding ding ding we have a winner in the house , your a good thinker , yes to tournaments.
     
  13. Tennis_Bum

    Tennis_Bum Professional

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    Brad, you are getting weirder by the minute but I guess you have to be like to if you managed to do all of the promo for your son. I still say you are pretty good at that. But you are one weird dude to write in third person all the time. Everyone here knows it's you.
     
  14. chalkflewup

    chalkflewup Hall of Fame

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    Just don't get caught up in the rodeo. Who cares if he's getting handouts as they may need the help. You're right, he can play just like a few other great players his age across the country.
     
  15. BMC9670

    BMC9670 Hall of Fame

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    I hear you. Just calling his BS, which I guess is pointless with a guy like that. His son is a good player and I wish him all the best. I just hope his Dad's ego is not his eventual downfall. Time will tell.
     
  16. ga tennis

    ga tennis Hall of Fame

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    I think alot of Deits success is because of Brads ego.
     
  17. BMC9670

    BMC9670 Hall of Fame

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    Success or train wreck. Time will tell. Look at what happened with his daughter.
     
  18. widmerpool

    widmerpool Rookie

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  19. ga tennis

    ga tennis Hall of Fame

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    Thats kinda unfair to say.When parents get divorced it can cause alot of problems for the kids.When my parents got divorced it caused me alot of problems for a long time.Only getting to see my father two weekends a month was terrible for me.Im sure that the mother didnt have the same tennis passion as the father.I think that her not training everyday with the father kinda made tennis not important.The daughter is doing great even tho she isnt playing tennis.I know when my daughter is top 5 in America im probably gonna brag too.Brad has done an incredible job with Deit he gets nothing but respect from me.
     
  20. BMC9670

    BMC9670 Hall of Fame

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    We'll have to disagree on this one, that's all. I've said before that the kid is a great player - no problems with it at all. My problem is with his attitude towards other people, their ideas, their goals, methods, etc. It's the typical "if you don't agree with me, you're wrong" attitude. He doesn't discuss or debate, he just starts fights. I know you are all-in with your daughter's tennis as well, but you act quite a bit differently than he does.
     
  21. TennisCoachFLA

    TennisCoachFLA Banned

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    I don't mind the bragging. But developing a good American junior player is light years different than developing a world class pro player. Until that is done, no claims of superior training methods or superior developmental path should be made by coach/dad.
     
  22. BMC9670

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    Bragging is one thing (even you do that ;-)). He goes way beyond that as you know. In any case, even at the top level of the game, there are different approaches, paths, and perspectives. Look at Andre's father's approach as opposed to Pete's. Very different.
     
  23. ChiefAce

    ChiefAce Semi-Pro

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    I have no doubt in my mind, you and I exchanged emails 2-3 years ago on Youtube when you were considering changing the kid to a one handed backhand, and I told you that would be a huge mistake because his two hander was so good. I would ask someone to film that forehand though (Dartfish), and put it up next to a few pros to examine that non dominant arm a little more. The kid works so hard it probably wouldn't take much time to fix it.

    As always, best of luck.
     
  24. Number1Coach

    Number1Coach Banned

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    Lets see , she is going to college and working a job , from your tone seems she has failed ? I would agree with you but I won't cause that was her choice.
     
  25. Number1Coach

    Number1Coach Banned

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    Well lets see , "I don't like his attitude because he does not function on bloges the way I do " what kind of elites attitude is that ?

    Listen there is always a right way, a wrong way, I am not sure way, which way are you doing things to get your pupil to the top of the tennis world ?
     
  26. BMC9670

    BMC9670 Hall of Fame

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    Again, you missed the point. By your own admission, you have very little to do with her. "Last I heard, she was...." is what you wrote. Once tennis was out the window...
     
  27. BMC9670

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    Disagree, debate, make an argument... all good. All of which can be done without calling people stupid, idiot, a joke, or mocking their choices - all of which you've done on this forum. Civility is not elitism.

    My kids are still little and I'm not trying to get them to the "top of the tennis world". I don't believe it's right to determine what my children will be in life. That choice will be theirs. I believe it's my job to set them up to have as many options as possible when they are old enough to make their own choice. A good education, a social and moral conscience, and a healthy lifestyle are at the top of the list. Tennis, as well as other sports, is a part of this journey for us, not the only journey. Do I want them to be the best tennis players they can be? Sure, but I will not set a "professional" goal on a kid that has not even reached their 10th birthday. I wouldn't tell them, you have to be a doctor, a teacher or an astronaut at this age either.

    Now, you probably disagree, and that's OK. I have never once said you were wrong, stupid, a joke, or any other derogatory in my end of debates on this forum. That's the difference.
     
    Last edited: Nov 17, 2011
  28. 10schick

    10schick Rookie

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    Ignore him.
     
  29. slice bh compliment

    slice bh compliment G.O.A.T.

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    ^Too much perspective and civility, BMC9670. Your kids will not be good professional players. Simple as that. They will grow up with tennis as a PART of their lives. Maybe college players. Losers, in other words. Not winners.

    Research shows true tennis success has to come from a parent with athletic talent, but severely disappointing results in his own athletic career. Maybe some daddy issues, too. He has to live, breathe and bleed vicariously through his children.

    The hunger has to come from the parent, usually the same gender parent. Both parents can do all the marketing and the logistics of building a tennis career. But the dad's got to be intensely involved.

    The kids have to work hard on and off the court, of course. But the real hard work has to come from the parents. I'm talking about money. Support. Creating the environment for success in this most individual of sports. Being psychic enough to know precisely when to be criminally abusive and when to just be pushy.

    The discernment must come from the parents to divine things like:
    When to trust coaches and
    when to treat coaches as hired hands who might be double agents.
    When to yell and scream vs just throwing stuff and chucking runner-up trophies in the trash publicly at a tournament site.

    Gotta have:
    the 'us against the world' mentality.
    The confidence to make backroom deals.
    The WILL to travel and sacrifice the trappings of a normal childhood, whatever that is.
    The skill to homeschool from an early age on. And the guts to home school. That takes guts. All of this does. But it builds character. Not doctors and lawyers. It builds people who might or might not make it as professional tennis players.
    The hunger for tuna or PBJ sandwiches in shared hotel rooms....until the sponsorship dollars come in. But that could be a while.

    It's a tough gig being a committed, SERIOUS tennis parent. Most of us are not cut out for it.

    EDIT:
    I know I'm not.
    My kids might be talented and hard-working, but it'll take a lot more singlemindedness. Having had some success in sports and in academics, I think my wife and I are cut-out to have a more well-rounded family (at least early on, until the kids decide they want to specialize in a certain sport or discipline). Right now, it's looking good with the reading, writing, arithmetic, soccer, basketball and tennis. But we're only talking 12s and 10s at this point.

    So...good luck to the rest of you tennis parents!
     
    Last edited: Nov 17, 2011
  30. BMC9670

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    ^^^ I agree with you (except the part that a kid is a loser because they do not become a pro tennis player). I'm not trying to make professional tennis players. Just trying to say that you don't have to be an a-hole to people if you are.
     
  31. slice bh compliment

    slice bh compliment G.O.A.T.

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    Of course. I was being sarcastic with the 'loser' tag. I used that word for effect.

    Being a competitive student athlete is absolutely a great experience and I would love that for my kids. If it is an option, I'd love really any rewarding college experience for them...over slogging it out as a journeyman or a satellite player.

    I'm speaking from my personal experience. I loved both, but, you can't really beat the team feel of college ball! Well, Davis Cup...sure, but I was nowhere near that level. LOL
     
  32. BMC9670

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    I hear you. I played college basketball and also ran track for a couple of seasons and loved it. Both different but great experiences.
     
  33. Number1Coach

    Number1Coach Banned

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    You just hit it on the head ! You just broke down the chapter on Toni Nadal in Rafa's new book awesome , you just gave everybody on here insight on what Toni did to Rafa.
     
  34. BMC9670

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    Yes, many parents of the greats had/have this in common, but not all. Sammy Sampras (as opposed to Mike Agassi) and Robert Federer (as opposed to Toni Nadal) for example. Brad, best of luck. I do honestly hope your son becomes a successful professional player.
     
  35. Number1Coach

    Number1Coach Banned

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    One question on Federer , do you think his dad placing his face in a snow bank after a tournament was good for his smart mouth towards his dad? BTW it created a bloody nose to be accurate.
     
  36. BSPE84

    BSPE84 Semi-Pro

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    If that's true, what do you think would have become of their relationship as adults had Roger not been successful (injury, burnout, etc.)?
     
  37. Tennis_Bum

    Tennis_Bum Professional

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    That's cool. I see your boy and Brad's boy playing on the 25th. I'll try to see both kids. Yes, I know they play different events.
     
  38. tennis5

    tennis5 Professional

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    And there lies the problem.

    For all the abusive, but I am sure well meaning on some level, dads who push their kids too hard,
    the end result is not a great player (because really you have to be a great athlete to begin with),
    but more of a damaged parent - child relationship.
     
  39. BMC9670

    BMC9670 Hall of Fame

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    Yeah, I heard about that one. Sounds like Fed had some attitude issues for a few years. Many teens do. My dad had to kick my butt now and then, a few times physically, and looking back I deserved it. Not because I lost in a sport or because of his ambition for me, but for disrespect or stepping over the behavior line. I think that's pretty common.
     
    Last edited: Nov 17, 2011
  40. Number1Coach

    Number1Coach Banned

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    Like every kid that is given a solid balance of disciplined as they grow up with the highest respect for their parents and others.
     
  41. Number1Coach

    Number1Coach Banned

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    The parents who push their kids to excel in school, sports, cleaning their rooms, and everything else they put their hands to truly love their kids and want the best for them.

    The ones who don't push and have to repeat themselves over and over verbally or hope that some kind of magical lightbulb will go on and all of a sudden show this mystical responsibility that cause them to strive for greatness are pretty sad parents.

    Just look and listen to all the kids at the occupy camps around America wanting everything handed to them and do not want to work for anything , just looking for handouts ,,, these are kids that were never pushed and left to do what ever they wanted in their young lives.
     
  42. Tennis_Bum

    Tennis_Bum Professional

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    I push my kids too. I don't see anything wrong with it. I agree with Brad here, one of those rare moment indeed. Pushing kids is a good thing in my opinion. But making predetermined goal for a kid to be some one in something is a different story. I'll let time be the judge of that. I like parents who push there kids because a Brad wrote, that shows that they really care. I don't like parents who let the kids do whatever they want. Again, that's just me. There is no perfect formula to push a kid, every kid is different so every method of pushing is definitely different. Some kid just needs a nudge other needs a lot more. I am far from figuring that out but I do push my kids though.
     
  43. BSPE84

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    Tough to disagree, but bloodying the kid's nose is obviously not a way to earn that respect. In this country it will backfire at best and at worst land Dad in jail.

    So kid told me he had a nice long chat with yours at LC over the weekend. Said all they talked about was school work, no mention of tennis... guess Deit might be thinking college after all ;-).
     
    Last edited: Nov 17, 2011
  44. BMC9670

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    Yes. I'm completely with you on this one.
     
  45. TennisCoachFLA

    TennisCoachFLA Banned

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    Hopefully the kid knows full well that a college scholarship is his strongest bet for a bright future and making money in pro tennis is not likely. And the girls are much cuter at a Cali college than they will be stuck in flea bag motels trying to make $800 at some back water tourny.
     
  46. BSPE84

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    Thanks, but I'm sure Deit's will be more interesting :).
     
  47. TennisCoachFLA

    TennisCoachFLA Banned

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    You were fine until the last paragraph. Overgeneralization. Many highly motivated and hard working people have protested what they perceive to be wrongs. Some may be bums, others are very hard workers who simply believe in a cause.
     
  48. TennisCoachFLA

    TennisCoachFLA Banned

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    Why? Its more fun to see a little guy finding his way in early tournaments, the strokes can be inventive and the occasional balls going over the heads is amusing.

    Most of the older age matches are cookie cutter affairs, just trying to collect points. How many times can you see 2 players hit from 5 feet in back of the baseline all match long until one of them hits it out? Most of the 16s and 18s you could change their shirts and you can't tell one American junior from the next.
     
    Last edited: Nov 17, 2011
  49. Tennis_Bum

    Tennis_Bum Professional

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    I enjoy watching different age groups. But I know exactly what you mean. I just hope that the two events are in the same location but I have doubt.
     
  50. BSPE84

    BSPE84 Semi-Pro

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    Well at 5'7" he's not so little anymore, but compared to Deit at 6'4"...

    With the focus on academics, my kid is not finding the same success in the 14's as he had in the 12's. This tournament is actually to try and collect some points to hopefully qualify for Winter Nats :oops:.
     

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