Raising a tennis playing kid

Discussion in 'Junior League & Tournament Talk' started by Flat Top, Nov 5, 2011.

  1. sureshs

    sureshs Bionic Poster

    Joined:
    Oct 1, 2005
    Messages:
    35,800
    Comparing home schooling with public schooling makes sense only in certain situations. Just like comparing private with public schooling. Home schooling requires tremendous commitments from parents and children and proper time management, and often a stay-at-home mom. Those who do it obviously do it by choice. They cannot be compared with the vast majority of families who just send kids to school. The demographics are also different - public schools have various requirements to include all sections of society within limited budgets. Regarding the quality, large disparities exist, just like public schools. Some homeschoolers do well, some do well because they focus mostly on what they like, some don't do well and are a nightmare for colleges and NCAA.

    Personally, I think the hybrid model makes a lot of sense for those who have special needs, whether physical disabilities, or simply more time for tennis.

    I follow a model where I let my kid get the basic stuff down and experience the hustle and bustle of school life, and at home I run a parallel "school" on couple of subjects that I want him to focus. As long as the government provides a road, I can drive a Ford or a Ferrari. That is how I look at it - use the facilities provided by the school, and then build on it yourself.

    I can tell you this is better than the systems in Asia. The grass always looks greener on the other side. Compulsory high standards in schools (as opposed to a tiered structure of basic/honors/AP) do not cater to the vast majority of students from different demographics and produce stunted people and corporate slaves.
     
  2. TennisCoachFLA

    TennisCoachFLA Banned

    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2007
    Messages:
    4,338
    No, it is pretty common knowledge at large multinationals that overall Americans are more creative thinkers and Asians superior at tasks requiring rote learning skills.

    Samsung hires Euro and American educated people all the time to give them the right blend.
     
  3. TennisCoachFLA

    TennisCoachFLA Banned

    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2007
    Messages:
    4,338
    I know plenty of home schooling tennis parents. Its not just about tennis.

    Parents who are big into tennis for their kids have multiple goals. The enjoy the fact that tennis makes kids stand on their own, make their own calls, coach themselves in match play. Tennis is a great way to teach children self reliance. Those same goals would also attract them to home schooling.

    Home schooling also allows for more free tournament travel. But I don't think tennis homeschooling parents are after anything different than any other home schooling parent. Kids who think for themselves and not from peer pressure.

    The socialization thing is a total myth that has been crushed numerous times. Sitting in a forced setting with 25 other kids all day is not socialization. A home schooled kid interning, working with kids and adults, etc. is just as good or better in term of socializing.

    All home schooled kids I know also attend numerous groups of other home schooled and traditionally schooled kids. They play on soccer teams, take karate lessons, you name it.

    The vast majority of people have zero clue as to the realities of home schooled kids. Its different so it must be bad. Whatever.
     
    Last edited: Nov 19, 2011
  4. TennisCoachFLA

    TennisCoachFLA Banned

    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2007
    Messages:
    4,338
    Not true. Tennis parents like tennis for their kid because it stresses self reliance and responsibility. That also attracts them to home school.

    The fact that regular schools spend more time on class time and home work yet do not generate better academic performance than home schooled kids pretty much crushes your points.

    The fact is that in no way, shape, or form are home schooled kids worse off academically than traditional kids.
     
    Last edited: Nov 19, 2011
  5. TennisCoachFLA

    TennisCoachFLA Banned

    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2007
    Messages:
    4,338
    You guys crack me up.

    1. I post numerous studies from all sorts of groups about home schoolers doing just fine.....nope, the studies don't matter for this reason or that reason.

    2. I post a list of top high schools showing plenty of top schools in the south.....nope, this school is not there that list must stink.

    Big traditional education is a huge money maker.....they would kill to bash homeschooling. Yet not one study shows homeschooled kids do worse. Because they do not exist.

    This forum gets dumb when you stick to a view point with zero actual evidence to support it.
     
  6. Number1Coach

    Number1Coach Banned

    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2010
    Messages:
    1,450
    Your using logic and making a great point ! To that I say shut up you will kill this page LOL . I enjoy watching all the educated people on here argue with each other I am hoping to learn something and you may mess that up .But you make a great point .
     
  7. tennis5

    tennis5 Professional

    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2010
    Messages:
    1,290
    I am not writing this to change anyone’s mind who has written on this board,
    but for the folks who read the board and might be on the fence.

    Calculus,
    Trig
    Statistics
    Chemistry,
    Lab work
    Physics
    4th year Spanish grammar

    Tutor, Tutor, Tutor

    There is no doubt in my mind that you could produce a superior child by homeschooling

    1) If the parent had a masters in at least one subject
    2) A tutor for the above subjects.
    3) A parent with the discipline, patience, intelligence to stay at home and work with that child,
    set up lesson plans and correct the work.
    4) Proximity or the willingness to explore cultural events.
    5) $ to pay for the above.

    But, I hear you saying, "Oh, we have such and such program, and it is done for us".
    Those programs work for a few, but not for most.
    I am not here to ruin someone's business, so I am not naming companies,
    but the colleges are not wowed by them.

    Of course, what I am seeing is just
    BASED ON MY INDIVIDUAL EXPERIENCES…
    NOT GENERALIZING, JUST SAYING WHAT I SEE.

    I do see extraordinary homeschool kids, but they don’t play tennis.
    Their time, all of it , is dedicated to studying.
    The tennis homeschooling folks try to fall under this group,
    but, sorry, playing 4-6 hours of tennis and fitness a day,
    it is just impossible to excel in academics.

    When I talk to the homeschool dads at the national tournaments, and the kids are out of the tournaments…
    Are they off visiting the historical site that the town is know for or the museum?
    No, the kids are there to watch the next round of tennis.

    And while some do fine in college,
    there are many stories I have heard from college coaches where the academy kids struggle with the school work..
    What is appalling is the coaches don’t care, they are just using the kids for tennis and if they do well or not in college, well it doesn’t seem to concern them. I would think they should consider the student as a whole (student- athlete), but they only seem concerned with the athletics.

    Most disrespectful kids in the tennis world to refs - the academy kids
    and the kids who seem to think the "N" word is ok for any sentence.
    These two groups seem to think it is ok to talk back to the ref or the tournament director.
    In the workplace, I think they would last an hour.

    Tennis Coach, you might be shielding your daughter from the mean girls who are just interested in the boys,
    but eventually she will have to deal with the mean girl who tries to steal her boyfriend in college….
    Attitudes, salty words just get worse as the kids get older.
    Better to get use to the kids at an early age, and learn to negotiate your way through tricky situations.
    The mental games the girls play at age 7 is nothing compared to age 17….

    To BB: – looked up the National Spelling Contest winners –
    http://public.spellingbee.com/public/results/finishers
    Top thirteen contestants ( a few tied for tenth place):
    2 were homeschooled,
    the rest are from public school.
     
  8. Tennishacker

    Tennishacker Professional

    Joined:
    Dec 31, 2009
    Messages:
    991
    There are two freshman scholarship girls on my daughters team who had to sit out the pre-season tournaments because the NCAA had issues with their home school courses.

    Coach said, "NCAA is getting tough on home school recruits"
     
  9. coaching32yrs

    coaching32yrs Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2010
    Messages:
    449
    I agree. The following articles detail the problems with home school: Ruedner article from Univ of Maryland, Reich article from Stanford, Willard and Oplanger article. Bottom line: there is no legitimate study supporting the adequacy of home schooling. Those supporting home school on this Board are rationalizing the choice they made in favor of tennis. My tennis playing child is involved in the arts. Our school has a jazz band, a wind ensemble, a band, an orchestra, a chamber group and 4 chorale groups. He is in the band. They have class every day and a private once a week. In addition, there are rehersals, 4 major performances, a parade, and 6 sporting events they play at. And that's just music- there are performing arts as well. Explain to me how the home schooled kids get this exposure to the arts. Or maybe you think arts and culture are not important. In addition, every time my kid plays an away tournament- we do something cultural. It is not forced, he is involved in the arts every day.
     
  10. Tennishacker

    Tennishacker Professional

    Joined:
    Dec 31, 2009
    Messages:
    991
    I'm sure this has been discussed before, but when did DB start home schooling?
     
  11. klu375

    klu375 Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2009
    Messages:
    503
    The study about test scores was commissioned (and payed for) by Home School Lobby and executed by Home Schooling Expert. Don't you think they have a vested interest in the outcome of this study?
    > The study, commissioned by the Home School Legal Defense Association and conducted by Brian Ray, an internationally recognized scholar and president of the nonprofit National Home Education Research Institute (NHERI), is called “Progress Report 2009: Homeschool Academic Achievement and Demographics.” <
    Maybe they want to compare their homeschooled population with the top public or private schools product? And where do you think homeschooled kids sit on socioeconomic ladder? Why not compare apples to apples?
    As far as the list of best schools - there are many of them, they may include some southern schools but education (especially public) in the NE is still generally much better than in the south.
    I am not against home school, I would even consider some mixed approach for my kid but our state values their public school system very much and if you home school - you are on your own. You do not need to show them what you do but they will not help you at all.
     
  12. BSPE84

    BSPE84 Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2010
    Messages:
    418
    Really? And I thought it was because we were living out a fantasy through our kids :).
     
  13. Number1Coach

    Number1Coach Banned

    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2010
    Messages:
    1,450
    1st grade he started in house education.
     
  14. Number1Coach

    Number1Coach Banned

    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2010
    Messages:
    1,450
    Once again he starts some of his training as early as 430 am so he can get on with his studies by 630 am 2 to 3 days a week , tennis is only 1 part of his life, being smart allows the intelligence to understand the game he plays at a higher level .
     
  15. BSPE84

    BSPE84 Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2010
    Messages:
    418
    I don't doubt what you say is true, as I learned last week there seems to be another side to your boy than just tennis. Sounds like he's very intellectually curious, which is awesome... Hey listen, being "educated" is not so bad, I'm just rooting for Deit to prove it to you one day ;-).
     
  16. MarinaHighTennis

    MarinaHighTennis Professional

    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2011
    Messages:
    1,001
    Location:
    Huntington Beach, CA
    Are you saying that Asians are not creative? Look up Jason Yang, Davis Choi, Clara Chung, etc. The list goes on and on...
     
  17. Number1Coach

    Number1Coach Banned

    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2010
    Messages:
    1,450


    """""""""so he can get on with his studies by"""""""" who do you think is his influence ? i just don't think the dad or DB think school is that huge, like I have always maintained most of Washington D.C. is loaded with Ivy league grads that are destroying our country. It's very obvious that when it comes to you calculating a situation you struggle to see the simple genius.BTW glad last week you learned something new that has been very clear for over 15 yrs.
     
    Last edited: Nov 19, 2011
  18. Number1Coach

    Number1Coach Banned

    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2010
    Messages:
    1,450
    Samuri swords, throwing stars ,sushi, toyota , honda, and on and on
     
  19. slice bh compliment

    slice bh compliment G.O.A.T.

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2004
    Messages:
    10,050
    While misspelling samurai you throw in some stereotypes and list two automobiles manufacturers famous for reverse-engineering European cars? That's the best you can do?

    Asia is so vast. Just the thought of the many cultures of that continent is incredible. And you cannot even come up with something better than that.

    Kama Sutra
    Bahai, Zoroastrianism, Islam, Hinduism, Jainism, Buddhism, The Caste System (that one's pretty creative)
    The Art of War
    The I Ching
    The Great Wall of Chine
    The Dynasties (Khan, Ming, Ting, etc)
    Mogul architecture
    The Silk Route / Road
    Many varieties of martial arts (you did mention throwing stars)
    Kimchee
    Pho
    Basmati rice
    Anime
    Pokemon (gotta catch 'em all)

    Well, too many more creative things from that continent to even try to go on. Toyota and Honda, hahahaha, dude, you are hilarious.
     
    Last edited: Nov 20, 2011
  20. ga tennis

    ga tennis Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2010
    Messages:
    1,710
    Im a public school teacher in rural Georgia.We are the poorest county in Georgia.Our entire highschool is on free lunches.We have over 30% unemployment.Many of our kids come to school just to socialize.Last years senior class we had at least 10 kids go to major universities.Vandy,U.G.A,Ga Tech,Emory,Citadale,etc etc... My point is after teaching in public schools for over 15 years(real experience not quoting any article) ive come to one conclusion..IT AINT WHERE YOU SEND EM ITS HOW YOU RAISE EM!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Homeschool,Public school,private school thet are all good.
     
  21. BSPE84

    BSPE84 Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2010
    Messages:
    418
    Who do I think is his influence? Let me take an "educated" guess, the father figure with disdain for education who wants his kid to turn pro at 15?

    Hey whatever makes sense to you :confused:. Let me know if he ever needs help with his math homework. I mean it. Best to the kid as always...
     
  22. BMC9670

    BMC9670 Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2008
    Messages:
    3,096
    Well said.
     
  23. BMC9670

    BMC9670 Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2008
    Messages:
    3,096
    You keep coming back to the conclusion that all of the country's ills are caused by education. Politicians are politicians for a reason and the system has it's problems mainly from the influence of money, not how or where someone was educated. Plenty of smart people in politics - but that doesn't mean they will always do the right thing.

    Furthermore, how one is educated makes a big difference in career options. You don't have to have a college education to invent the next internet craze or be a professional athlete, but you sure do if you want to become a teacher, a doctor, an architect, a biologist, a psychologist, or any of the thousands of "professional" choices. I don't know what my kids want to be when they grow up any more than they do right now, so it's my job to prepare them for as many choices as possible, which first and foremost means a good education. It simply opens the most doors.
     
    Last edited: Nov 20, 2011
  24. sureshs

    sureshs Bionic Poster

    Joined:
    Oct 1, 2005
    Messages:
    35,800
    My experience has been that while teaching my son two subjects (math and one science every year) on my own has helped him a lot, he seems to get into it only when his public school teacher teaches it and conducts a lab. Till then, it does not make an impression on him. After that, he nicely combines the school stuff with the extra I teach him (the extra is nothing more than the rest of the chapter in a US-wide textbook which the school does not go into but which is required for the SAT 2). In math, I am now becoming hands-off as the school teaching has become more than adequate in high school and reached the same level or higher as in Asian countries (but without the tension and punishments). And yes, I have purchased textbooks in math and science from 5 school boards from 2 Asian countries and the UK GCSE and the French IB. The US textbooks are far better while the others focus only on the syllabus and testing of each local board and are frankly, badly written.
     
  25. Pro_Tour_630

    Pro_Tour_630 Legend

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2004
    Messages:
    5,154
    Location:
    Connecticut
    no you posted research that said home schoolers do better than traditional schooled kids:confused: I showed you why the article was biased, that is all.

    the key word is STRUCTURED in her research, notice how she omitted "UNSTRUCTURED" KIDS FROM HER RESEARCH:oops:, IF THAT IS NOT SKEWING THE DATA I DO NOT KNOW WHAT IS.

    How about this, let us omit special ed students and ESOL students and only include students from higher incomes and both parents having PHD's, and say the data is not skewed:roll:
     
    Last edited: Nov 20, 2011
  26. tennis5

    tennis5 Professional

    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2010
    Messages:
    1,290
    This is a vicious cycle of one of the reasons why there are two Americas in this country.

    Education and hard work to raise one's self out of poverty is taken by new immigrants in this country,

    and yet others who have resided for so long here eschew education, and the poverty continues.
     
  27. chalkflewup

    chalkflewup Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2009
    Messages:
    1,697
    Most logical perspective on this thread yet - thank you!
     
  28. petepoyry

    petepoyry New User

    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2011
    Messages:
    26
    ...and this raise a question where is my wife, teacher, spending her afternoons with all that money?
     
  29. Number1Coach

    Number1Coach Banned

    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2010
    Messages:
    1,450
    I will, cause calculous way beyond me and thats where you could step in .
     
  30. Number1Coach

    Number1Coach Banned

    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2010
    Messages:
    1,450
    You mean ILLEGALS who are breaking the law or those who respect government and look to obey ?
     
  31. Soianka

    Soianka Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Sep 18, 2009
    Messages:
    2,023
    The reason they have been able to do so is not because the "Washington DC Ivy league grads" are too educated, it's because much of the country is not educated enough
     
  32. ClarkC

    ClarkC Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2008
    Messages:
    3,773
    Location:
    Charlottesville, VA
    Yes, our public schools teach lots of critical thinking skills, such as:

    1) Everyone's opinion is as good as anyone else's.
    2) Your opinion does not need to be well-informed.
    3) You can base your opinion on a few anecdotes rather than studying the matter carefully.

    The irony of your post makes it a masterpiece of comedic irony. What analytical process did you go through to reach your conclusions?

    By the way, I have never home schooled my kids and have no personal stake in the matter.
     
  33. ClarkC

    ClarkC Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2008
    Messages:
    3,773
    Location:
    Charlottesville, VA
    A study of structured home schoolers versus public schoolers is only designed to compare structured home schooling to public schooling. Leaving out unstructured home schoolers is not "cherry picking." This is how research is done.

    If a parent is considering structured home schooling for their child, any study that mixes structured with unstructured home schooling would be worthless for the purpose of informing them about their decision. Someone should do another study comparing one group of unstructured home schoolers to structured home schoolers, another comparing one group to private schoolers, etc. That's how you do studies to determine which factors produce which results.

    People on public message boards cannot spell, cannot punctuate, and cannot logically analyze a situation, and then they tell others about how education should be done. We have an entire nation now with an inability to spell simple words. A significant percentage of posters on sports message boards that I read think that lose is spelled loose. In fact, the proportion of such posters is far greater than the proportion of adults who were private schooled or home schooled. That means we have a lot of people who spend 13 years on the public dime and cannot spell lose correctly, and numerous surveys indicate they don't know square one about the U.S. Constitution, cannot tell you in which 50-year period the U.S. Civil War occurred, etc. What did they do for 13 years?

    Then they come online and pontificate about who is getting a good education and who isn't. It would be funny if it were not so sad.
     
  34. ClarkC

    ClarkC Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2008
    Messages:
    3,773
    Location:
    Charlottesville, VA
    I guess no social science studies of any kind are valid, then. Those doing the studies have not figured out how to isolate the factors you mention. It never occurred to them to compare children all of one income level and geographical region, with the same level of parental education. They don't know how to do multiple regression for factors that are known to make a difference in outcomes.

    They should read these tennis message boards more. That would inform them of how to better do these kinds of studies.
     
  35. ClarkC

    ClarkC Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2008
    Messages:
    3,773
    Location:
    Charlottesville, VA
    If only those stupid social scientists could figure this out and stop doing studies that compare school outcomes for kids from radically different socio-economic environments! You should email some of the authors of these studies to enlighten them on this subject.
     
  36. ClarkC

    ClarkC Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2008
    Messages:
    3,773
    Location:
    Charlottesville, VA
    No doubt your education taught you to go off and do a lot of research before making that statement!
     
  37. ClarkC

    ClarkC Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2008
    Messages:
    3,773
    Location:
    Charlottesville, VA
    True, but irrelevant to the discussion. The discussion was started by someone saying that he would not move south for tennis reasons because he would be lowering the education level for his children, due to the lesser schools in the South. Such a person would be able to choose exactly where to live before moving. Why would he move to the average public school district in Alabama or Kentucky for tennis reasons? Out of all places in the south, he would find the intersection of (1) where he can get a comparable job to his current job, (2) where is the education opportunity good for his children, and (3) where is the tennis opportunity good for his children. Out of a large region, there should be possibilities that fit all three criteria. Averages across the whole region are irrelevant.
     
  38. ClarkC

    ClarkC Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2008
    Messages:
    3,773
    Location:
    Charlottesville, VA
    Reading the Washington Times article reveals that there is a lot of useful info there, including breaking down results by different groups:

    Having read quite a few educational studies over the years, I find the small spread of test scores in these groups pretty noteworthy. Almost no differences were found between one income bracket and the kids who were two income brackets up. Only seven percentile points difference when moving from "neither parent has college degree" to "one parent has college degree" to "both parents have college degrees." Scores in the 83rd percentile for kids from homes where neither parent has a college degree.

    If someone has the comparable spreads for public school kids in these categories, we can decide if these studies really do or don't tell us something. I will find some data if I have time, but my test cases are about to finish on my computer, so my time is about up for this. :)
     
  39. ClarkC

    ClarkC Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2008
    Messages:
    3,773
    Location:
    Charlottesville, VA
    My oldest son played piano and oboe. The piano lessons were private and started in 1st grade and continued through 11th grade. That's where he learned to read music, studied music theory, and learned piano technique as well. I bet you that every kid in your kid's public school who plays piano learned it through private lessons. Schools do not buy a bunch of pianos and try to teach every kid piano.

    He was private schooled from K-12. The school had bands for different ages. He played oboe in the 5th-6th grade band and got private lessons on the side. Do you know of schools, public or private, that can do a good job of teaching all the different band instruments without anyone taking private lessons?

    In 7th grade, he had a scheduling problem that kept him out of the school band. So he auditioned for a local youth orchestra and got a spot. He continued the private lessons as well through about 10th grade. He also did a summer program at the University of Virginia in which he learned small ensemble chamber music, which culminated in a concert performance that was beautiful.

    Note that some of this happened at a private school with a big emphasis on breadth of education, including fine arts, but most of it happened outside of school. I would think that a local home schooler could have done the same things that he did. In fact, he encountered home schoolers in the various extracurricular programs that I mentioned. He also encountered home schoolers at community organizations where kids put on plays.

    Music and arts are really bad examples to choose for criticizing home schooling.
     
  40. TennisCoachFLA

    TennisCoachFLA Banned

    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2007
    Messages:
    4,338
    ClarkC....thanks for your contributions, they are always insightful whether we are on the same or opposites sides of issues.
     
  41. ClarkC

    ClarkC Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2008
    Messages:
    3,773
    Location:
    Charlottesville, VA
    You are correct in that last statement: You do not know what skewing the data is.
     
  42. tennis5

    tennis5 Professional

    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2010
    Messages:
    1,290
     
    Last edited: Nov 20, 2011
  43. Number1Coach

    Number1Coach Banned

    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2010
    Messages:
    1,450
    When guys like you point out the obvious and the truth all in one swoop about our country and this board you ruin all the fun!!!
     
  44. ClarkC

    ClarkC Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2008
    Messages:
    3,773
    Location:
    Charlottesville, VA
    I am afraid that I lack the time to give you a complete education in how studies are done. Maybe some other time. Revive the thread on December 3 if you wish. Will have more time for long posts then.

    Until then, here is a hint: Some in the thread criticize mixing students in a study from all kinds of different groups, because it obscures important factors (e.g. mixing different socioeconomic groups and getting average statistics). Then others criticize a study because it does NOT mix two very different groups of home schoolers and average their scores together. Perhaps the critics of the studies need to adopt a consistent position on mixing and averaging across different groups.
     
  45. tennis5

    tennis5 Professional

    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2010
    Messages:
    1,290
    A study was commissioned by a homeshooling group that is cited here.
    Already that puts a bias on it...
    and one rightfully questions the data as it was not done by an independent research organization,
    but by a group that will benefit from the results.

    The group that did the study promotes homeschooling.
    By the way, they also sell products:

    Online Curriculum Market where you can save a lot of money buying and selling homeschool-related materials and books. Anyone can sell, but only HSLDA Members may purchase items (and it's free).

    Special discounts in our bookstore.

    The HSLDA PerX program, offering members Xtra benefits that are substantial and practical. You can receive discounts on home and auto insurance, school supplies, hotel reservations, and much more.


    HOW IS THAT FOR A HINT....
     
    Last edited: Nov 20, 2011
  46. BSPE84

    BSPE84 Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2010
    Messages:
    418
    Hey Brad, just between us it's "Calculus". You really need to be more careful with your spelling here or some over-caffeinated Ivy leaguer might be coming after you :).
     
  47. tennis5

    tennis5 Professional

    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2010
    Messages:
    1,290
    While we are on this conversation, and this is not directed at Brad, or anyone, but.......

    THE WORD IS:

    a lot - correct

    alot - this word does not exist, but the whole world seems to be spelling it that way.
     
  48. TennisCoachFLA

    TennisCoachFLA Banned

    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2007
    Messages:
    4,338
    Just because a group sponsors a study does not mean it is biased. It could be, or not. You have to look at the actually methodology.

    How about a study from a guy who set out trying to prove homeschooling is inferior yet proved the opposite?

    http://www.homeschooling-family.com/research-against-homeschooling.html
     
  49. Number1Coach

    Number1Coach Banned

    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2010
    Messages:
    1,450
    So you understood the context of the message response despite the spelling ,that is a good start ? So what do you think the level of a kids academics who gets up "on his own" as early as 430 am to get workouts out of the way and spend as much as 6 hrs strait in the books? Be proud of your child's academics but remember facts are hard to state when you have never truly compared. TO that I say Shalom
     
  50. Number1Coach

    Number1Coach Banned

    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2010
    Messages:
    1,450
    TCF trying to prove your right on here about the path your going down with your child and many others are that none of these guys have attempted is a losing argument.

    Home schooling is for the wise not the smart!!
     

Share This Page