Recommend stringing machine

Discussion in 'Stringing Techniques / Stringing Machines' started by benxuan, Jan 26, 2013.

  1. benxuan

    benxuan New User

    Joined:
    Jul 18, 2012
    Messages:
    88
    Hello everyone,

    any recommendation for stringing machine? something affordable. I'm a home stringer.

    Cheers!
     
    #1
  2. v-verb

    v-verb Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Nov 9, 2012
    Messages:
    2,076
    Location:
    Toronto
    Klippermate. Cheap, reliable, time tested.
     
    #2
  3. Squidward

    Squidward Rookie

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2011
    Messages:
    390
    Depends on what you're looking for. Drop weight, Crank, Electronic...

    You say affordable, but it help to know what your budget is. You might be able to find a used machine in your price range that has the features you're looking for.
     
    #3
  4. Lakers4Life

    Lakers4Life Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2009
    Messages:
    3,638
    Location:
    Laker Land
    #4
  5. benxuan

    benxuan New User

    Joined:
    Jul 18, 2012
    Messages:
    88
    I'm looking at 1-2k

    but i used to be using babolat star 5 for the past year.
     
    #5
  6. Andyroo10567

    Andyroo10567 Professional

    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2011
    Messages:
    1,140
    Location:
    Home
    May i ask why your switching away from the Star 5?
     
    #6
  7. Lakers4Life

    Lakers4Life Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2009
    Messages:
    3,638
    Location:
    Laker Land
    The key words are "used to using", meaning he did not own it.

    I would recomend a used Babolat, since he's used to a Star 5.
     
    #7
  8. benxuan

    benxuan New User

    Joined:
    Jul 18, 2012
    Messages:
    88
    Yeah the star 5 is not mine and i shifted away from the shop since.

    Used star 5 you mean?

    any other suggestion? I'm looking at Prince 6000 or some machine with 6 pt.
     
    #8
  9. Lakers4Life

    Lakers4Life Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2009
    Messages:
    3,638
    Location:
    Laker Land
    There are a couple of Prince 3000 available for $2000. A used 6000 and 5000 don't usually come up for sale that often.

    If you are looking for new, any high end crank with a Wise 2086 is your best bet.
     
    #9
  10. benxuan

    benxuan New User

    Joined:
    Jul 18, 2012
    Messages:
    88
    What about Prince NEOS. heard alot from them. Are they good?
     
    #10
  11. benxuan

    benxuan New User

    Joined:
    Jul 18, 2012
    Messages:
    88

    Which high end crank will you recommend?
     
    #11
  12. Lakers4Life

    Lakers4Life Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2009
    Messages:
    3,638
    Location:
    Laker Land
    Neos 1000 is old technology. You are better off with a Neos 1500 or Gamma 6004.
     
    #12
  13. Technatic

    Technatic Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2009
    Messages:
    474
    Take CP!

    My advice:
    Buy a Constant pull;
    - With so many strings with totally different elongation character, the difference in result (DT value) without CP will be big.
    - You are used to CP with the Star 5.
     
    #13
  14. Dr. Perry

    Dr. Perry New User

    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2012
    Messages:
    42
    I have been looking too.

    It comes down to

    1. your budget range;
    2. what would make you happy;
    3. features, practicality;

    My sugestion is to take your time, hopefully you can try one or two stringing job before deciding one.

    In my case, I used a ATS SS II, and Neos 1000, see a 6004 in the club I go. I really like the Neos 1000! It is easy to use. Everything is GOOD! However, the quality from ATS SS II is not inferior at all. Yes, it may take a minute or two extra time to mount the racquet. The lever may not be perfectly level everytime. The price difference is nearly $900.

    The next thing you should consider is ... how often you would use the machine. Using it once or twice per month (home user) is very different from once or twice a week situation.

    At the end, I would say no rush, take the time and listen, try it if possible.

    Good luck!
     
    #14
  15. darklore009

    darklore009 Professional

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2012
    Messages:
    1,481
    Location:
    In Your Dreams
    With that price range, might as well get a constant pull machine. Though the neos is nice, you could get like the gamma II els
     
    #15
  16. TennisCJC

    TennisCJC Legend

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2010
    Messages:
    5,368
    Get a Stringway dropweight with 2 action gliding clamps and a brake.

    It is built like a tank. Mine is 6 yrs old and as good as new.

    It is constant pull.

    It pulls correct tension at any angle. You don't have to worry about dropping the tension arm to parallel with ground. Any angle is spot on tension. This is one of the main reasons I bought this machine.

    It is drop weight. Cranks have springs which deteriate with time. Electrics have motors which deteriate with time. Drop weight has heavy metal and gravity which do not deteriate with time.

    It has a very good 5 point mounting system. I like it but a some of the expensive floating mount systems 6 point may be a little better.

    It has outstanding clamps - built like a tank. The only drawback is they can be a little bulky.

    Get the brake as it is needed for the crappy prince o ports if you plan to own or string the crappy prince o port rackets.

    I bought a tool stand and it works well as it is a good height and the machine fits nicely. $50 bucks for the stand. I may invest in a rolling stand with cabinets and drawers so I can store all my string and tools in one unit in the future.

    LaSerFibre offers similar features but they are a crappy company - they may take your money and never deliver or deliver something different than you ordered or be so slow with deliver that they irritate the heck out of you. LaSerFibre = good products = crappy customer service.
     
    Last edited: Jan 28, 2013
    #16
  17. Irvin

    Irvin G.O.A.T.

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2007
    Messages:
    12,105
    Location:
    Marietta, Ga
    Since all stringers are built like tanks why don't they make tanks out of old stringers?
     
    #17
  18. domosborn

    domosborn Rookie

    Joined:
    Mar 1, 2010
    Messages:
    200
    Not an expert from what i've heard on the forums + some experience you can't go wrong with a gamma 6004+wise or a neos 1500+wise
    (My vote would be neos but as has been said countless times, they are both excellent and either will make you happy)
     
    #18
  19. Dr. Perry

    Dr. Perry New User

    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2012
    Messages:
    42
    If money is no object, go for the most expensive one in your budget range. It is like why drive a honda if you can afford a Lamborghini?

    If you are a value hunter, a klippermate can produce the same result, at the expense of some logistic issues you need to take care in addition.

     
    #19
  20. Irvin

    Irvin G.O.A.T.

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2007
    Messages:
    12,105
    Location:
    Marietta, Ga
    Affordable low use = cheap drop weight. You get what you pay for, no matter what all the X2 and KM owners are going to cry out. Misery loves company. I am not saying they are not good machines that will last a very long time, but that they are very affordable and designed for low production which appears to be a perfect fit for your parameters.

    If you buy a high end machine and string every couple of weeks it will take you decades to recoup your money.
     
    #20
  21. Technatic

    Technatic Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2009
    Messages:
    474
    For the quality

    I like this one because the answer is easy; For the quality.
    Our whole family drives Honda, among them some very old ones, and we never had to go to the garage for any defect with any of them.

    The Lamborgini has "built in defects" being built in Italy.

    And perhaps this answer counts for stringing machines also: Better buy a high quality drop weight than a lower quality electronic from Asia.
     
    #21
  22. kkm

    kkm Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2008
    Messages:
    649
    If one's budget allows and his antiicpated usage justifies the outlay, why not buy a high-quality electronic machine? And one could even look for a used high-quality machine in good condition.
     
    #22
  23. Technatic

    Technatic Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2009
    Messages:
    474
    2nd hand quality = ok

    I fully agree!
     
    #23
  24. jgrushing

    jgrushing Rookie

    Joined:
    May 26, 2010
    Messages:
    251
    Irvin,

    I agree with your posts much more often than not and you're certainly more of an expert than I. Even with the post above, I think you're mostly right on. A $2K stringing machine in a basement used twice a month is, for the most part, an unnecessary luxury. It's probably a much better stringing experience.

    However, the whole "you get what you pay for" statement implies that the string jobs on entry drop weights are, by their very nature, inferior to stringing on a more sophisticated machine. I would be glad to string two racquets, one on a Klippermate and the other on a Neos with a Wise system, and defy people to tell the difference. I'm not talking Roger Federer or Pete Sampras. I am talking about the people on this board; up to 5.0 or 5.5 players.

    I've strung for many years and found that most players, even the good one, don't know what they use or want. And for the most part, they don't know the difference. I know that I can turn out job after job that's very consistent, in under 25 minutes on a KM. I enjoy stringing on the Neos more but it's still just a tennis racquet when it's done.

    Because we enjoy it, we tend to over-mystify the whole stringing process as if it's some magical thing. The truth is, for non-stringers out there, it's quite easy with just a little practice. My 18 year old son was stringing very acceptably at 12 years old.

    Get what you can afford within reason to the level of convenience you'd prefer. All of the durable machines string racquets just fine.
     
    #24
  25. Irvin

    Irvin G.O.A.T.

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2007
    Messages:
    12,105
    Location:
    Marietta, Ga
    I could agree more with one exception. I don't think anyone could identify a racket was strung on a KM or the best stringer in the world. I do think it is far easier to have consistancy results with a better machine but I would challenge anyone to tell me which machine a racket was strung on.

    Normally I don't reply to these threads about which machine is best for me because only you know the right answer to that question. But if you want the most affordable machine for a home stringer buy a cheap drop weight. If you are going to open a pro shop and will have different people using the same machine and want consistent results in a short period of time cranks and drop weights ahold not be on your list.

    Now some are going to say these automatic drop weights are consistent. I am going to say you can't not set a drop weight of any kind to a specific value within +/- 0.1 lb 3 times in a row. Maybe +/- 0.5 lbs would be good. If that's the best you can do then why not just use a normal drop weight and forget paying the extra money for "automatic drop weight" marketing jumbo jumbo.
     
    #25
  26. Technatic

    Technatic Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2009
    Messages:
    474
    Hi Irvine,

    I think that we had this discussion about the accuracy of auto drop weights and electronic machines before.
    The “smoke curtain” of any electronic machines is that it “makes the stringer think” that it is very accurate within +/- 0,1 lbs because it has the digital display.

    In praxis it is impossible for the complicated system of an electronic machine to pull on that accuracy and certainly not with the “second pull”:
    - The electric motor has to stop pulling at exactly the chosen tension, which is very difficult and which results in overshoot that many electronic machines create.

    It is very hard to beat the simplicity of the drop weight and certainly the auto-ones and if the string needs a tiny repull the system does that without a problem and any overshoot.
    And calibration is not needed with such a system as long as the earth pulls at the same weight.
     
    #26
  27. Irvin

    Irvin G.O.A.T.

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2007
    Messages:
    12,105
    Location:
    Marietta, Ga
    If you take a sliding drop weight the weight is placed on a bar at various marks. The difference between 60 lbs and 59 or 60 lbs is probably 1 mm. Are you trying to tell me you can hit that 60 lb mark time after time with < +/- 0.1 mm accuracy every time? If you are I don't believe it. And you are right an electronic will pull individual strings at probably +/- 0.2 lbs but over the entire string bed I would think it is more consistent than always being off +/- 0.2 lbs like an automatic drop weight. Then you have the crank machine when calibrated properly and set to 60 lbs it will lock out at 60 lbs with < 0.1 lb accuracy over and over and over again. Ad oh yet as soon as it locks out the string starts stretching so you will have exactly 5% or 10% tension loss. I guess it all depends on what expert you listen to. There is not law that says I can't pull tension more than once. No matter what kind of tensioner you use once the tension is disconnected you start to loose tension.

    EDIT: I guess what I am trying to say is there isn't a best stringer for anyone, and every type stringer from the lowest to highest priced models has its own unique clientele.

    EDIT: I would go so far to some some people may string with a big Wilson machine at home and take an X2 on the road with them. One machine is not right or the best for anyone all the time. And if you don't know a lot more than what you can glean from a few posts about the person that will be using a machine how can you identify what is best for him. All I know is he is a home stringer and wants to spend $1-2K. I don't even know what kind of dollars he is talking about.

    EDIT: Oops my bad he said 1-2k and I assumed dollars.
     
    Last edited: Feb 1, 2013
    #27
  28. Dr. Perry

    Dr. Perry New User

    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2012
    Messages:
    42
    One portable + one stationary? It is an intriguing idea.

    Correct me if you see it differently: I don't think the 0.1, 0.5 lb accuracy will make any difference in the game, neither the outcome nor the feel. When the tension is consistent across board, that's what matters.
     
    #28
  29. Tennusdude

    Tennusdude Rookie

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2012
    Messages:
    361
    Klipper is good except that you will have to raise tension to make the job comparable to what was done on crank or electronic. Dont let them fool you, even though the drop weight is constant pull, those flying clamps lose alot of tension.
     
    #29
  30. Technatic

    Technatic Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2009
    Messages:
    474
    Could it be that you mean the scale of a crank?

    Dropweights have a bar of 40 to 50 cm for a scale from 10 to to 35 kg, meaning 16 to 20 mm per kg.
    The dropweight I used and still have has a distance of 23 mm between kg's, so 2,3 mm for every 0,1 kg.
    so I think that you can adjust this very accurately, because the scale is much wider than on a crank.
     
    Last edited: Feb 1, 2013
    #30
  31. mad dog1

    mad dog1 Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Jan 25, 2010
    Messages:
    4,878
    technatic is right on and irvin is misguided once again. if you've had firsthand experience stringing on a stringway autodropweight, you'd know.
     
    #31
  32. Irvin

    Irvin G.O.A.T.

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2007
    Messages:
    12,105
    Location:
    Marietta, Ga
    If you're playing with one racket you're correct.
     
    #32
  33. Technatic

    Technatic Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2009
    Messages:
    474
    dropweight scale

    found a nice picture:

    [​IMG]
     
    #33
  34. Tamiya

    Tamiya Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2013
    Messages:
    798
    Location:
    AU, SG, MY
    dayum, if you're gunna position your weightknob right onto printed scale... that's a great way of screwing up that vital printed label :shock:
     
    #34
  35. Irvin

    Irvin G.O.A.T.

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2007
    Messages:
    12,105
    Location:
    Marietta, Ga
    That is very good. And if I wanted to string the mains at 60 and crosses at 55 I would just set the weight to 27.22 and 24.95 respectively. It would be easier if you had a pound scale which i am sure you do. I can see how that would be very accurate but not racket after racket. Whereas if you had an electronic with two memory buttons (M1 and M2) you could select the tension over and over again and switch very easily by just pressing a button, and switch from lb to kilo very easily. The more human interaction you have the more human error you have.
     
    Last edited: Feb 1, 2013
    #35
  36. Tamiya

    Tamiya Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2013
    Messages:
    798
    Location:
    AU, SG, MY
    meh, if "accuracy" to the very last fraction of a pound was
    that important... mfg could easily make a dropweight arm that
    was a threaded rod & the weight winds up/down like a big nut

    or just rig up a tension balance to check
     
    #36
  37. Irvin

    Irvin G.O.A.T.

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2007
    Messages:
    12,105
    Location:
    Marietta, Ga
    If a customer wants a specific tension and you are two pounds off (yes i know that really is a lot) not problem he should just adjust his tension the next time (and should expect the same error.) Accuracy is not that important in a single racket. Accuracy in multiple rackets is very important if a player want the same in all of them.
     
    Last edited: Feb 2, 2013
    #37
  38. kkm

    kkm Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2008
    Messages:
    649

    Exactly!

    Plus while there are electronic machines that overshoot, there are electronic machines that don't.

    The Stringway ruler is kind of clumsy to adjust exactly the position of the weight on the bar, the ruler is not engraved on the bar, and there could be a better design and method than holding the ruler parallel to the bar to approximate the position of the weight on the bar according to the ruler, no? It surprises me more when this JET method of stringing requires changing tension several times while stringing a single racquet, how can there be great precision in general with a Stringway automatic dropweight, or even greater precision than for an electronic machine, with absolute certainty?
     
    #38
  39. Irvin

    Irvin G.O.A.T.

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2007
    Messages:
    12,105
    Location:
    Marietta, Ga
    I think where Technatic is coming from is how the electronic machines operate. There must be some on/off built in even if it is just 0.1 lbs (a Wise is about 0.2) so if I set the tension to 60 it pulls to some value (and a good electronic will always be the same) and shuts off. I'm not saying now if the tension is set to 60 it pulls to 60. Then the string relaxes and the electronic tensioner recognizes that an pull again to the same value it did before. So there is a +/- 0.2 error that's almost a half pound. When you clamp the tension could be anywhere in that range. And the faster you are the less consistent you are. The slower you are the more consistent you are. The slower you are the more time the string has to relax. Most of the relaxation is just after the stretch and if you clamp fast enough you cand stop that stretch so the electronic pulls once and is stopped when you clamp. Just like a lockout. If you takes a few seconds and allow the string to stretch the electronic will not continuously pull but will pull several times. If you listen you will hear it cutting off and on. The longer you let it pull the longer the interval between the offs and ons and the more consistent.

    I hate to admit this but there is only one type of continuous pull and that is with a drop weight. But is continuous pull really all that great? Would it be more consistent to pull for an exact length of time at an exact tension? If you answered yest you want a lockout. And there are arguments for electronics too.
     
    #39
  40. Technatic

    Technatic Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2009
    Messages:
    474
    If all strings would stretch in the same way the lock out systems would be quite consistent, but that is far from true. There are fast strings and slow strings and stretchy strings and stiff strings.

    * The difference and stretch behavior causes huge differences in the DT value on lock out machines.
    I would like to use graphs that were discussed earlier to show these differences:

    [​IMG]
    This graph shows the tension in 2 multifilament nylons a fast one and a slow one.
    Loss of tension in the upper graph is 17,6 lbs (out of 66 lbs) and most of the tension drop occurs in less than a second. This is a “fast string” which stretches very fast.
    Loss of tension in the lower graph is 11 lbs and the tension drops quite slow. This string stretches slower, because there is more friction between the elements.
    The rising graph shows that the speed of pulling is about the same.

    [​IMG]
    This upper graph shows a stiff mono (2,7 % tot el) and the loss of tension is 10 lbs and the string stretches slowly.
    The graph at the bottom shows a stretch mono ( 6 % tot el) and the tension loss is 13,2 lbs and the tension drops quite fast, so it is a ‘fast’ string.
    So the difference in loss of tension and DT value is huge and depends on the type of string.

    * The second problem with a lock out is that it actually prestretches every string, making it stiffer to play with then it is on a CP machine.
    A string is prestretched when the string is tensioned at a higher tension before it reaches the actual final tension. So the strings in the graphs are prestretched at tensions which are 10 to 17,6 lbs higher than the final tension.

    This changes the playability the string considerably the player will feel a stiffer string.

    On a CP machine the tension in the string will not overshoot the adjusted tension by more than 1 or 2 lbs, depending on the quality of the CP system.

    IMO it is impossible for a stringer to reckon with these influences of the specs of the strings.
     
    #40
  41. struggle

    struggle Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2010
    Messages:
    4,267
    Location:
    Western North Carolina

    right, strings don't relax after being strung on a CP machine.
    like most engineer types that want to spout off about numbers,
    you my friend are not thinking clearly.

    when i lock out, I'm clamping. i'd say there's very little difference if you are methodical
    and not too slow.

    would i like to have a nice high end CP electronic machine? heck yeah.
    will i produce better stringjobs on it? i doubt it.
     
    Last edited: Feb 2, 2013
    #41
  42. Irvin

    Irvin G.O.A.T.

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2007
    Messages:
    12,105
    Location:
    Marietta, Ga
    Technatic those graphs show one pull. What happens if you pull a second time after the initial stretch or even a third time? You do notice that each time the initial pull resulted in the same peak tension.
     
    #42
  43. Irvin

    Irvin G.O.A.T.

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2007
    Messages:
    12,105
    Location:
    Marietta, Ga
    When you pull tension with a lockout it never pulls over the lockout tension. A lockout tensioner may pre stretch the string but so does EVERY constant pull machine. But it is only a pre stretch if you pull again. Where a constant pull has overshoot the lockout never does. If you think the lockout pre stretches a string what do you call the initial stretch of a string on a drop weight? Don't tell me you don't think a constant pull stretches a string and continues stretching the string.
     
    #43
  44. 1HandedBackhand

    1HandedBackhand New User

    Joined:
    Sep 8, 2011
    Messages:
    64
    Location:
    Tipton, Mo
    The only difference in a high end machine and a low end drop wt. is that the low end one takes more skill and time. I actually think stringing with say "a Klippermate " is more satisfying. Misery loves company Irvin.....really?
     
    #44
  45. Technatic

    Technatic Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2009
    Messages:
    474
    Thanks I will clear my head again.
    Strings relax on a CP machine also but the tensioner compensates for the loss of tension caused by the slow elongation.

    The graphs show 2 things:
    - How slow you should pull on a lock out to have little loss of tension, the slower you pull (with any string) the lower the loss.
    - On a CP machine you can see when you can clamp a certain string, this is after all the elongation is developed. If you clamp too fast there will still be loss of tension.

    That is why a fast stringer is a soft stringer on any machine!

    The loss of tension is caused by the remaining elongation in the string. This remaining elongation occurs only one time. When you pull tension again the remaining elongation that is developed in the first pull is not developed again so the loss of tension will be smaller.
    You actually feel a stiffer string.

    If you would pull very slow on a lock out there could be no loss at all.
    The slower you pull the lower tension you can use.


    I see this differently:
    Take the first graph:

    [​IMG]

    When you want to create the same DT value after stringing with a CP machine you should adjust it at 24 kgs while the tension was set at 30+ on the lock out.
    So the string was prestretched by 6 kg’s on the Lock out compared with the CP.

    So the remaining elongation up to 30 kg is pulled out of the string on the lock out, while on the CP only the remaining elongation up to 24 kg is developed.

    While the remaining elongation is part of the stretch in the string during play, the player feels a much stiffer string at the same DT value when it comes from the Lock out.

    It would be very interesting to string 2 racquets on the lock out for a player, one at normal pulling speed and one at very low pulling speed at a tension of 4 kg's less.

    The DT value can be about the same but the string should offer more comfort.
     
    #45
  46. Irvin

    Irvin G.O.A.T.

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2007
    Messages:
    12,105
    Location:
    Marietta, Ga
    And why is it that you seem to ignore the fact that I can pull tension again with a lockout?

    Yes

    Yes

    Somewhat true the loss of tension is caused by the string relaxing. Wen stretched the string will resist change especially poly. But if the tension is held the string will stretch over time.

    You're making assumptions like in your picture that with the lockout I only pull one time. Bad assumption.

    That would depend on the stringing methods. At the same DT value and stretch it is impossible to feel any difference in the stringbed.

    Yes

    EDIT: You may also want to add a third racket in there and pull once with a lockout and 5 seconds later pull again. Why is it that you always seem to ignore that solution? At last years GSS Symposium someone (Jaycee?) used a lockout to string a racket with identical results to a CP machine using this method.
     
    Last edited: Feb 3, 2013
    #46
  47. Tennusdude

    Tennusdude Rookie

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2012
    Messages:
    361
    wow I would like you see you play tennis
     
    #47
  48. struggle

    struggle Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2010
    Messages:
    4,267
    Location:
    Western North Carolina
    technatic,

    all you are suggesting is that if you let the CP machine pull all of the elasticity out of the string, then yes you will have a nice, solid, DEAD stringbed.

    i agree.

    enough with your BS.
     
    #48
  49. Technatic

    Technatic Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2009
    Messages:
    474
    No I mean the opposite:
    When a string stretches the total elongation consists of elastic- and remaining- elongation.
    On a CP machine all the elongation in the string above the stringing tension is still available for playability, because the tension in the string does not exceed the final tension in the racquet.

    On a lock out the final tension in the string is lower than the stringing tension of the tensioner, which means that the remaining elongation above the final tension is pulled out of the string, so the string is stiffer.

    If you want to call it dead stringbed the one of the LO is more dead then the one from the CP

    The BS reproach is a little bit a pitty, when we are having a technical discussion?
     
    #49
  50. struggle

    struggle Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2010
    Messages:
    4,267
    Location:
    Western North Carolina
    fair enough about my BS comment, but the rest is just bs.

    as soon as you clamp, on any machine, you start to get elongation/stretch whatever you choose to call it. i'd say i'm MORE consistent clamping in a consistent amount of time than than you, who seems to imply that the CP machine corrects for that by constantly re-stretching the string.

    you can't fool smart folks with graphs and charts, they're just not real-world.
     
    #50

Share This Page