recommended string setup for 10yr old

Discussion in 'Tennis Tips/Instruction' started by stephenbbb, Apr 4, 2014.

  1. stephenbbb

    stephenbbb New User

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    my daughter is almost 10 and currently uses a 26in head graphene instinct with head intellistring at 54. it takes about 1.5 months and the crosses start to move too much and they need change.

    please suggest an alternative string that lasts more, but is still gentle on the arm (and hopefully cheaper).

    thanks everybody.
     
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  2. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    My strings always start to shift from Day One, by my 10th hit.
    She can straighten them, to do something between points, or she can leave them well enough alone.
    I don't know anyone who can play tennis who has a string job that doesn't constantly move all around, especially the mains.
     
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  3. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    Of course, nobody can recommend a string for the kid unless he/she knows the way your kid hits.
    Some 10 year old are poopy hitting beginners.
    Some 10 year olds can hit with 4.5 level male players.
     
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  4. user92626

    user92626 Legend

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    OP,

    6 weeks is a decent amount of time for a new string job. Almost all cheap co-poly's can perform well at a low tension, like around 45-50lbs, per your requirement.

    Smooth copolys move around but very little and inconsequential.
     
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  5. eelhc

    eelhc Hall of Fame

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    Not knowing anything about your 10 year old... Gamma X-2, Klippermate or a inexpensive used stringing machine and a reel of Forten Sweet, Gosen OGSM or Prince OSG. Change the strings every~15hrs.
     
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  6. TennisCJC

    TennisCJC Legend

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    if your daughter is a beginner to lower intermediate, I suggest any synthetic gut at 54 lbs would be fine. Tecnifibre or Gosen OG, or Prince w/dura flex syn gut would be good.

    If your daughter is an advanced intermediate or above, a good 16g multifilament like NRG2, Excel, or NXT at 56 lbs should be fine. Also, good multi for a little less $, are Alpha Gut 2000, Babolat Addiction, or Wilson Sensation.

    By the way, moving strings don't necessarily mean you have to change them. Again, for a lower intermediate to below, just straighten the strings with your fingers and keep playing.

    If the strings feel like they have lost a lot of tension and the ball is "trampolining" off the string bed or if they feel like they have gone completely flat with no spring in them, then it is time to change them.

    A good multi or syn gut should last your daughter about 3 months unless she hits very hard and/or plays a lot of hours per week. I know decent adult female players who play with syn gut or multis for well over 3 months.
     
    Last edited: Apr 4, 2014
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  7. Topspin Shot

    Topspin Shot Legend

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    I would most definitely not recommend polyester for a 10 year old girl.
     
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  8. TeamOB

    TeamOB Professional

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    On the Kyrgios/Thiem/Zverev bandwagon!
    Why not? I see many pre-teens hitting with polyester. They have no problem. If they are going to play at a high level they are going to have to use polyester anyway, so might as well get used to it early.
     
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  9. SFrazeur

    SFrazeur Legend

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    Getting 6 weeks out of a string job is great. I would echo the suggestion of getting a low cost dropweight like the Gamma X-2. They are great when only needing to restring once a month or longer. Going with poly is needless. You would need to restring even sooner, 2-3 weeks, as they become harsher as they lose tension.
     
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  10. TennisCJC

    TennisCJC Legend

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    I disagree. You don't need polyester until you have decent swing speed - either you are hitting the ball hard and/or with a lot of spin. For most under 13 years old, I don't see a need for poly.
     
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  11. seminoleG

    seminoleG Semi-Pro

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    My Daughter uses Kirschbaum Pro Line II. 1.20. We restring every 3 weeks. She plays 4-5 days a week. Pro line has worked great for her 11, we considered Technifibre Black Code (she's sponsored by both) but the Pro is great. We were @52, with Babolat, switched to head and dropped to 50#.
     
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  12. Topspin Shot

    Topspin Shot Legend

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    I don't like the idea until the player has gone through some puberty. Maybe work with a hybrid of some sort. I don't think the reward is worth the risk; it's not like a 10 year old girl will hit hard enough to really take advantage of the poly.
     
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  13. user92626

    user92626 Legend

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    What's the scare of poly?

    Poly is very smooth that it doesn't move much out of place and elastic, soft if you string low tension. Loud and snappy for audible feedback. Because it's more durable, you can enjoy thinner gauge for accuracy. These are all the properties I love about polys and can't find in synth gut.

    Proline II was excellent for me, the first Kirschbaum string to get me try other Kirschbaum strings. I only stop using red proline II 17g due to its expensive price.

    String poses the least "risk" of all. Bad technique, bad running, bad framing, bad serving, bad shoes are far more injurious.
     
    Last edited: Apr 5, 2014
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  14. seminoleG

    seminoleG Semi-Pro

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    All good points. Soft Poly is just fine. @52#s We've been with this setup since she was 7. Have seen other kids with arm issues and eventually they all came to Soft Poly.
     
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  15. stephenbbb

    stephenbbb New User

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    to semiloleG

    can you pls tell me how to apply for the sponsorship?
     
    #15
  16. newpball

    newpball Legend

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    So you think that most kids are going to play high level tennis? :confused:

    That's like thinking that everybody has an above average intelligence.

    I think gut is the best string for kids.
     
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  17. SpinToWin

    SpinToWin G.O.A.T.

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    Kirschbaum Pro Line II is expensive? Babolat RPM Blast is at double the price, Luxilon strings at triple the price, etc. Kirschbaums are reasonably priced for their performance, especially if you buy a reel.
     
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  18. SpinToWin

    SpinToWin G.O.A.T.

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    okay that's the other extreme… Gut is a waste of money on a junior, they do not have the game to appreciate the increased playability. A reasonably priced multifilament does the job. The number one string I use for kids is Wilson Sensation. It's ideal for their level.
     
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  19. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    You can apply for a partial sponsorship (discount) any time. Best to provide a video, some tournament results, her strokes in video of course, to a rep in your area.
     
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  20. seminoleG

    seminoleG Semi-Pro

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    Go to website of company and they all have a link for sponsorship or Team. Put in your kids information and they get a reply usually within a week.

    Kirschbaum pretty quick reply as well as Technifibre. Babolat Head and Wilson also relatively quick. Actually head got back to is same day.
     
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  21. seminoleG

    seminoleG Semi-Pro

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    We've dropped to 50#s with Head Speed MP. The Pro Line II 1.20 is good but we are getting only 1 weeks ~12hrs out of them. Went thru 2 rackets @ torunament in one day but had used those strings for practice little over a week.
     
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  22. stephenbbb

    stephenbbb New User

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    amzed your 11yo girl can swing the Speed MP. she must be the future Serena. I switched from Extreme to Speed recently and the difference in power generation is tremendous. my girl can hit with the Extreme, but absolutely not with Speed.

    anyway, getting back to the strings suggestions:
    many folks recommend strings that are rated as much stiffer than the intellistring. my stringer is a nerd on strings and he recommended FXP. he bases it on ratings from http://www.tennisindustrymag.com/articles/2012/01/string_selector_2012.html
    (scroll down to the table). you will see many synguts are as stiff as poly. it seems ashaway and head are focused on softness, so give better choices for kids than some of the suggestions, assuming the child needs a soft string.

    Here in Canada, Head did not respond at all to my inquiry about sponsorship and Babolat told me she has to be over 12 ranked in top 20.

    cheers everybody.
     
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  23. jason586

    jason586 Rookie

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    I've had many young juniors like the feel of a synthetic main with a soft, thin co-poly cross. It keeps strings straight for a fairly long time; gives adequate power; is quite soft since the mains move freely + are soft; and can be really inexpensive (i.e. - OGSM natural-color Mains + any Pros Pro soft, thin Co-Poly Cross).

    I can't use this myself because I break them in two days or less, but for the younger juniors that can not create the pace and spin, it lasts quite well for them. Seniors and ladies without a lot of pace or spin seem to really like this set up as well.
     
    Last edited: Apr 29, 2014
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  24. SpinToWin

    SpinToWin G.O.A.T.

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    that's okay. Polyesters go dead the longer they are (played) in a racquet and that can be harmful for the arm. At this stage, it's better that they break at that point in time, as you'd be cutting them out only a few hours later and would be risking pains if you didn't. There is no perfect string, but as long as she is playing well and without pain, all is well.
     
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  25. GuyClinch

    GuyClinch Hall of Fame

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    Natural Gut is perfect for almost everyone cept a hard hitting high level player - and even then many of them use Natural Gut/Poly hybrid.

    The great thing about Gut is that it holds tension really well, and its easy on the arm. So if you are not a string breaker its going to last.. Its still provides more spin then a multi.. So its not bad on spin either..

    I'd just go pure gut - its pricey but you will only need to restring a few times a year.
     
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  26. SpinToWin

    SpinToWin G.O.A.T.

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    Full gut for a junior… Really now?

    If she's playing well with poly, then let her play a soft poly at low tensions, at this age they cannot appreciate the feel of gut yet. Also, if she likes a thin gauge full poly, there is no way she'll like full gut… I'd somehow, more or less get it if you said gut/poly hybrid, but full gut?… :?
     
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  27. GoudX

    GoudX Professional

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    A 10yr old girl won't have the conditioning to reduce injury chance due to badly framed shots, they are growing rapidly so they are more susceptible to injury anyway, plus due to their lack of experience compared to an equivalently ranked older play they will be shanking more shots. So even though they don't hit very hard they are at increased risk on injury from stiff setups. A softer 100"+ frame with multi/syngut is probably the best approach.
     
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  28. tennis_ocd

    tennis_ocd Hall of Fame

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    Perfect advice. Unless one is regularly breaking strings; gut is perfect. Soft and easy on the arm and it maintains a consistent stringbed from the first day to the last.

    Unless a hard hitter with tons of spin, poly is horrible stuff. Constantly changing properties and going dead in just a few hours. If the pros (5.0+) didn't use this stuff everyone would think it horrible.
     
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  29. TCF

    TCF Hall of Fame

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    Nah, been working with that age group for 20 plus years. Not a one has been injured from shanking balls with stiff strings. Proper warmup and proper technique, don't overdo it. Thats all that is needed at that age.

    Decent poly like RPM Team strung at 52-54, frame stiffness under 65, is just fine. Strings don't break and they do not have to fuss with putting them back into position.

    Kids get injured from bad form, overuse, no warm up, not by using a decent poly string, proper frame, and proper tension.

    Kids are more flexible and warm up more quickly. Any negatives with rapid growth are balanced out by the positives of youth. So kids who are properly trained are less likely to be injured.

    Lastly....kids do NOT shank balls more. Today's tennis kids are more likely to be properly trained from the start and less likely to miss hit. They hit with more concentration at first, slower feeds, way less mishits that most adults.
     
    Last edited: Apr 30, 2014
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  30. user92626

    user92626 Legend

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    Agreed with TCF.

    GoudX's reasoning seems overkill and overprotective of kids. Kids framing so much and so badly that it's an injury concern? Why don't you say that they're young so they also learn faster, frame less and heal faster?

    I have never run into anyone old or young that got injury from framing shots alone.

    Goud, you don't have to have a stiff setup with poly strings. Get a soft, thin poly and string 50lbs.

    I hate the mute and rough properties of synth gut.
     
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  31. GuyClinch

    GuyClinch Hall of Fame

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    Funny. I can't believe that anyone would recommend Poly..

    1) Poly was developed for string breakers - it enables you to hit out and not break strings. It's just super durable stuff.

    2) Poly enables more spin. But if you aren't generating a lot of spin its not going to be that noticeable. It might multiply the spin you have - but you need pretty good spin to really notice that change.. If you don't get much topspin and you use Poly - you still don't have much topspin.

    3) Poly is hard on the arm. Its hard on the shoulder, wrist elbow. Soft Poly, Poly hybrids - etc - it just transfers more shock to the person swinging the racquet.

    So when we talk of a young junior..Do they break strings? No. Do they hit with very big topspin and want to add more spin and hit with huge topspin? No. Juniors are going to hit flatter - they can't sacrifice as much power for spin like a Nadal can. Do they have awesome conditioning to mitigate any arm/wrist/shoulder damage? No.

    Do they have the money and brains to cut out seemingly perfectly good string out of a racquet after 10-20 hours of play? No. So with Gut you don't get the 'bonus' of Poly with it 20% more spin (assuming roughly the same stroke) or the ability to not break strings. But you gain all the advantages of gut - namely awesome tension maintence (you can play with gut till it breaks), easy on the arm, awesome feel..

    YMMV but I have found even in hybrid setups the dead poly means you end up cutting out string from the racquet..some of that perfectly good gut..So in the long run its not actually cheaper.. If it wasn't for the pros using Poly amateur players wouldn't either. Its just not good for guys who aren't big hitters.
     
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  32. TCF

    TCF Hall of Fame

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    A poly like RPM Team, with the proper frame and technique is NOT hard on the arm. We monitor arm soreness like the NSA....NONE of our kids have EVER had any arm soreness from RPM Team. Not one.

    This is another silly myth. 10000 ways a tennis kid can get injured....using a good poly, proper frame, proper warm us, proper technique is NOT one of them. Never has been.

    The advantage also is the strings do not move. Kids do not have to adjust them between points. Kids hate doing that and many times won't bother to adjust them in the heat of a match.

    Today's juniors use TONS of spin by the way. And juniors down here break non poly strings all the time. The 9-10 year olds even crush the ball.
     
    Last edited: May 1, 2014
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  33. nightfire700

    nightfire700 Rookie

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    My 10.5 old boy started with syn gut@58 2 yrs ago. Moved to multi@55 6 months back and now moved to full poly@52 3 months back. I never wanted him to start using poly so soon but he begged me to allow him to try it once as every other kid his age is using poly. Tried Tour Bite 16g and it was love at first hit but we don't get thinner gauge here so tried Signum Pro Tornado 1.17 (18g) and he liked it as well. Tried Pro Hurricane and Signum Poly Plasma as well. Pro Hurricance he hated saying it is giving him bad vibrations in the arm and Poly Plasma didn't give him the kind of control TB or Tornado gave him. Now we are restringing every 3 weeks and no issues till now.
     
    Last edited: May 1, 2014
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  34. tennis_ocd

    tennis_ocd Hall of Fame

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    In fairness, this was the original question. Instinct is stiff (at least in adult version.) Nothing about warm-up or technique.

    Just my data point and I'm sure I could warm-up better and don't have flawless technique but poly kills my arm. Almost instantly; even with a very gentle racket. I really wish I could use the stuff as I break the multi/gut 16 stuff too quickly. Have found I can get decent life out of 15L gut.

    I see many use poly with no issues. And many have problems. I'd never recommend it to a young kid unless a real breaker and stopping at the slightest arm soreness.
     
    #34
  35. SpinToWin

    SpinToWin G.O.A.T.

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    take Monogut ZX for a spin in a hybrid or a full bed.
     
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  36. GuyClinch

    GuyClinch Hall of Fame

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    I like how you voice such strong opinions based on anecdotal 'evidence'.. Oh wait I don't like that.

    Here is an article that it took me about 2 seconds to google. LMAO..

    http://newyorktennismagazine.com/ar...roper-use-string-may-be-hazardous-your-health

    What good does the Poly do for a 10 year old? You can claim it doesn't hurt them (dubious) but what good does it do? That's the question I have for you..

    Sure sure good technique is going to mitigate pain - but you can play with average technique with gut and be pain free..

    Of course its not surprising since I have hit with Poly and hit with Gut - guess which hurts less. <g> Use of Poly string for a ten year old is at best a waste of money (they aren't going to need or benefit from its advantages) and at worst its going to mess them up. Are you seriously going to maintain that Poly doesn't go dead after 20 hours or so (best case)? For some kids that won't even last them a week.
     
    Last edited: May 1, 2014
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  37. user92626

    user92626 Legend

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    I'm curious..do you think when you post? :confused:

    You discredit someone's experience as an anecdote only to go on and post another anecdote, some other dude's rambling about his teenage son's pain with poly.
     
    #37
  38. TCF

    TCF Hall of Fame

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    Ha, that is funny. But no worries, old wives tales are gospel to some.

    Our coaching group monitors all the kids we have taught. There have been injuries over the years. A good poly, proper frame, proper warm up, proper technique is just fine for jrs.

    But if some want to go for gut for kids, whatever. They want to think all the top pros started at age 3 when plenty started at ages 8-9, whatever. They want to think all top 10 women are 5'10" and up, when most are 5'8" and under, whatever. Free country, they can believe all the myths they want to.
     
    Last edited: May 1, 2014
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  39. Postpre

    Postpre Rookie

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    TCF,

    Slightly off topic, but what does your group do for warmups? What exercises are good to implement (that get the body going, and also prevent potential injury) in the warm up for young juniors?


    Thanks.
     
    #39
  40. tennis_ocd

    tennis_ocd Hall of Fame

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    Further off topic but...

    I find it neat that all different physiques can make it to the top of the WTA tour..... and that some, like Ivanovic, can crush a forehand.

    Still, about 8 of the current top 20 are *5' 10"* or over (using wta published stats.) That is quite tall and significantly over the avg women's height. Even what we consider the tiny ones -- Cibulkova, Errani, Suarez are really about average height. Top WTA players are, in general, significantly taller than the average female.
     
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  41. eelhc

    eelhc Hall of Fame

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    If the junior is not a string breaker... why not? Juniors used gut for a hundred years before synthetics were developed.

    They may not appreciate the feel of gut but their growing/developing arms will sure appreciate it.
     
    #41
  42. ijgill

    ijgill New User

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    Agreed my son at 10 uses a poly. Which reminds me, his 2nd racquet hasn't been restrung 18 mo! Yikes, he doesn't use it very much (identical to his primary - which was restrung due to.... a shank - sorry lol)
     
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  43. GuyClinch

    GuyClinch Hall of Fame

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    I didn't say anecdotal evidence was useless - just that it was easy to find a ton of evidence on the contrary. The consensus seems to be that Poly strings play very stiff - in that they don't have a lot of 'bounce' to them. Accordingly more shock is transferred to the arm compared to a more lively string like Natural Gut?

    Do you honestly feel that Poly strings play like gut? Based on your playing experience? Poly strings are REALLY strong. They are very hard to stretch and are extremely stiff - and stay that way even with low tensions. I'd have played with both strings..
     
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