Recommended tension for a classic wooden racquet

Discussion in 'Classic Racquet Talk' started by Dragan, Dec 12, 2012.

  1. Dragan

    Dragan Rookie

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    I recently purchased inexpensive but well preserved wooden racquet (Tretorn Court King, please see the image below), and would like to playtest it, since I never hit with a wooden racquet before.

    [​IMG]

    I plan to string it with a premium multifilament string (X-One Biphase 17 or Signum Pro Micronite 1.27mm) but I'm not sure which tension to use (there is no recommended tension printed on the racquet).

    Any recommendations? Would 55lbs/25kg be too much?
     
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  2. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    55-62 lbs., not sure if you might need some tubing to protect the wood grommet holes from string burn, but consider it.
     
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  3. Hannah19

    Hannah19 Professional

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    That's a bit tight for an old woodie. Looking at the type of string that is in the racket at the moment it seems like a low end model.
    Putting 55-62 lbs (25-28kg) on this woodie would certainly tear it apart.
    I'm quite experienced in stringing woodies and I would not go higher than 23kg on the mains and 22kg on the crosses. In this case I would go even lower, 22-21kg.
    But that's my humble opinion :)
     
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  4. Dragan

    Dragan Rookie

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    Thanks a lot, 58lbs will do the job then.

    I'm not overly concerned with grommets protection, since string(ing) will cost me three times more than I paid for the racquet (~ $8).
     
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  5. Dragan

    Dragan Rookie

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    Ups, I just saw the other reply... So it would be safe bet to use lower tension, like 23kg?

    I am sure that my first playing experience with wooden racquet will be quite hilarious, so I just need a tension that will be reasonably suitable for this frame without breaking it.
     
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  6. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    Hannah19 is very observant to notice the cheap stock strings on that racket.
    However, you want to simulate play from 1975, not actually use that racket for long term play.
    Most wood rackets are softer/flexier than anything made today. OK, stiffer than T-2000's.
    With soft stringing, it's a out of control trampoline.
    You can use soft stringing for stiff rackets, but not both.
     
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  7. coachrick

    coachrick Hall of Fame

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    I'd say a classic 55# would be good for a thin multi. Too tight and the frame will take all the impact. Plus, it's getting cooler there, yes? Tight strings in a 40 year old racket in cold weather...yikes!

    On the other hand, you could just try it the way it is. THEN, if you like the general idea, restring it with the good stuff OR look for a higher-end model. By the bye, is there a country of origin on the frame...perhaps on the butt cap?

    Huh, just checked the weather there. Guess you'll be indoors ;) .
     
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  8. AlfaAce

    AlfaAce Rookie

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    Of course, most wood racquets, played by pros "back in the day", would have been strung with 100% nat gut.

    Not applicable for this particular racquet, but didn't Borg string his Donnay All Pro at something like 72# :shock:???
     
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  9. Dragan

    Dragan Rookie

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    The racquet is made in Sweden (by Tretorn, they still produce tennis balls today). I decided to first hit with the original string, just to get the idea of how it plays, and then restring.

    Coming from a 100 square inch world, I guess there will be some frame hits, here and there, hope it will survive... ;)

    And yes, I be playing indoors (carpet), since we are under heavy snow for days.

    Thanks all for your advices!
     
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  10. joe sch

    joe sch Hall of Fame

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    Agree

    Those stock bottom of the line cheap nylon strings never played good so you will notice a big improvement with a nice soft sun gut or especially natural gut. Do not string more than 50lbs since you will be risking frame damage. Nice strings at 40..45lbs should play nice. Try some other player wood models and you will also notice the difference in playability (feel, touch, power)
     
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  11. ericsson

    ericsson Hall of Fame

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    I string the my small woodies around 16.5 kg with soft synt. or natural gut hybrid, some a little higher but never more then 20kg, they become boardy and the sweetspot is already small.
    Just my two cents...
     
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