Regular Ibuprfen use

Discussion in 'Health & Fitness' started by tennisplayer, Aug 4, 2006.

  1. tennisplayer

    tennisplayer Rookie

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    Regular Ibuprofen use

    I have found that having 2 caps of advil (total 400mg Ibuprofen) before playing does relax the big muscles - back, quads, hamstring, shoulders - and makes playing much easier. I tried this because I have had chronic knee problems for a long time, and 400mg of Ibuprofen really helps with that. I don't take anything after playing. Also, this dosage does not cause me any stomach problems (no irritations, etc).

    I am thinking of doing this regularly as a preventive measure. What I would like to know is whether this will result in any long term adverse effects. Thanks in advance!
     
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  2. tennisplayer

    tennisplayer Rookie

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    Sorry about the typo in the title - I am not able to edit it.

    BTW, I should add that the doctors I've talked to seem to think that 400mg of Ibuprofen per day is too insignificant an amount to worry about... wish I could believe that!
     
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  3. LuckyR

    LuckyR Legend

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    How old are you? I take 600mg before playing every time I play. Of course I play 0 - 3 times a week.

    The doage per week is almost insignificant.
     
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  4. tennisplayer

    tennisplayer Rookie

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    Mid forties. I play 4-5 times a week.
     
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  5. Nuke

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    I always take 2 ibuprofen about an hour before I play (2 or 3 times a week). If it's a long, hard match, I may take another one later in the day. It definitely helps as you get older, and I haven't noticed any stomach problems because of it.
     
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  6. LuckyR

    LuckyR Legend

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    Well, I guess that's three old guys voting for "better living through chemistry"...
     
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  7. Bottle Rocket

    Bottle Rocket Hall of Fame

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    In Brad Gilberts book he says that he takes (when he was on the tour) 2 Ibuprofens befire he plays and two more when he finishes a match. He says...

    "It really helps reduce the stiffness in the joints and muscles."

    I would think if there were any long term adverse effects from taking these drugs they would have been taken off the shelves by now and/or there would have been a dateline special on them. I too am interested in the disadvantages though.

    What about a lack of effectiveness for real pain on a tennis off-day?
     
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  8. ilovecarlos

    ilovecarlos Professional

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    I also swear by ibuprofen. I use it before I do really strenuous activity and then again about 6 hours later. Works like a charm. If I have to shovel a heavy snow, I'll take 4 with no ill effects at all and I stay pain free too! A miracle drug for sure!
     
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  9. tennisplayer

    tennisplayer Rookie

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    Yeah, this is a miracle drug indeed, especially for us older folks who want to play at maximum intensity against kids half our age! :)
     
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  10. TennisParent

    TennisParent Rookie

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    Hmm, I will have to check this out. Tennisplayer, how long before playing do you ingest the ibuprofen? I can't imagine that taking a couple of advils just before a big match can have much ill effect on us.
     
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  11. El Diablo

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    Taking ibuprofen BEFORE exercise might not be a good idea. Blood pressure tends to rise during exercise, and ibuprofen also tends to increase BP so peak BP may go higher than desirable. Long term use may be associated with kidney problems but this is not inevitable; those using it regularly are advised to check renal function periodically.
    Interestingly, a study of about 30,000 arthritis sufferers found a lower than expected rate of Alzheimers among those who used anti-inflammatories. The finding makes a certain amount of sense as the amyloid deposition that occurs in Alzheimers brains seems to involve an inflammatory reaction. Some Alzheimer's researchers (my field some years ago) believe anti-inflammatories may have a protective effect.
     
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  12. tennisplayer

    tennisplayer Rookie

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    If I take it, it's usually an hour before I play. It is very effective for me.

    El Diablo, thanks for the info. I didn't know how it affected BP.
     
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  13. Roffey

    Roffey Rookie

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    I take much more than that for a headeache, so I wouldn't worry.
     
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  14. travlerajm

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    IMHO, long-term regular ibuprofen use is not a good idea. Long-term use can cause kidney problems down the road. If my memory serves me, I recall ex-Seahawk Kenny Easily sued the Seahawks when developed kidney problems that he attributed to the ibuprofen that the trainer had him pop before every practice.

    That said, I'm in favor of using ibuprofen to manage inflammation in acute injuries. But I would never recommend using at as a long-term solution to a chronic problem.
     
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  15. artworks

    artworks Rookie

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    Meanwhile, I take 400-600mg of Brufen after a couple of exhausting games to help my body recover. I didn't know taking before gives an advantage. I'm in my late 30s.
     
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  16. Andy Hewitt

    Andy Hewitt Professional

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    Ibuprofen does absolutely nothing for me in terms of pain relief... it doesn't even get rid of my headaches.... Aleve is the best for a headache. Maybe it works for knee pain but definately not spinnae pain.
     
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  17. scotus

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    To ease my sciatica pain, I have had to take ibuprofen for the last year and a half. When the pain was most severe, I had to take up to 600 mg, but I usually take just 200 mg, and last couple of weeks I have been able to do without any and tolerate the pain.

    For me, it takes about 20-30 minutes for ibuprofen to kick in.
     
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  18. DragonFly

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    my track coach always told us to take motrin after a hard workout, to reduce swelling or soreness in the morning. but motrin plus ice is the best physical cure for a hard workout
     
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  19. Andy Hewitt

    Andy Hewitt Professional

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    Where do you have your sciatica pain?
     
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  20. xtremerunnerars

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    Every four hours for me, i get 200 mg. I'm suffering wrist tendinitis though, so my therapist gave me the order. I must say, it really helps. So far, no stomach trouble either.
     
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  21. Geezer Guy

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    I take 3 Ibuprofin about an hour before I play. I play 4 - 5 times a week, and have been taking Ibuprofin for well over 5 years. Both my doctor and my pharmisist said this dosage would not be a problem, and I have not experienced any problems. I always eat something small (such as a begal) before I take the Ibu's.
     
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  22. fishuuuuu

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    Daily dosages exceeding 1200 mg have been proven to cause long-term GI inflammation and ulcers.

    That said, I'm only 18, but I take three advil gelcaps approx. 600 mg a dose before I play. Makes me feel, painless.
     
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  23. chess9

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    Instead of the "begal" I eat three laboratory mice. They seem to keep me forever young. :)

    -Robert
     
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  24. Ronaldo

    Ronaldo G.O.A.T.

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    Have anyone tried warming up prior to playing or afterwards, then stretching instead of popping ibuprofen? Got lots of aches and pains but the warm-up ended the pain-killer approach. Btw, our club has a sampler box of Motrin liquid-tabs next to the hard candy. Play 4-5x week, 2x a day on weekends.
     
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  25. LuckyR

    LuckyR Legend

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    Uummm... what is your age?
     
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  26. Ronaldo

    Ronaldo G.O.A.T.

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    48 yrs 11 mos
     
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  27. LuckyR

    LuckyR Legend

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    OK, I'll say it: I am impressed. 49 and off of drugs! More power to ya...
     
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  28. Ronaldo

    Ronaldo G.O.A.T.

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    Tough with a sore left achilles and right plantar fascia but warmth and blood flow sure alleviates a lot of aches and pains.
     
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  29. d_frank

    d_frank Rookie

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    i only take it before if im already hurting from a previous hit. for example today, i knew my shoulder would be tight so i took 400 mg. ill take it during a match if i start to hurt as well, but im in fairly decent shape so it doesnt happen often.
    if i hit for an extended period every day, it starts to get tight, but usually im ok.
     
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  30. mctennis

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    Wait til you get to be 50......" what is a pain free day?"
     
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  31. mctennis

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    It depends on where is pain is and more importantly WHY you are having it. Old injuries and torn knees/shoulders/ hips etc won't get much help without some sort of pain relief meds. If you exercise often you won't normally get the muscle aches and pains. Or so I've noticed. I'm 50 btw.
     
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  32. Ronaldo

    Ronaldo G.O.A.T.

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    Lucky, other than some floating bone chips in my ankles and an arthritic elbow, joints are pain-free now as long as I limit hardcourt play and singles.
     
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  33. maverick1

    maverick1 Semi-Pro

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    50? I haven't been pain-free since about 30. Almost 44 now.
    Because of knee problems, I can't get up from the floor without using my hands for support. But once I am warmed up and the endorphins kick in, I can hustle on the court with anyone my age. The knees get pretty sore the next day, but rarely is it unmanageable.
    The only time I have taken Ibuprofen, for Tennis elbow. It made the pain go away for a week! I thought I had been cured but eventually it came back. Eventually, I got my TE under control after I removed lead from my rackets. I haven't taken medication since. I am reluctant to take medication just to alleviate a tolerable level of pain.

    But I am slightly tempted by the suggestion that it may ward off forms of dementia. That is something I worry about. I forget tennis appointments I made the day before, and I make the same typos over and over.
     
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  34. MasterTS

    MasterTS Professional

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    I would suggest using naproxen instead of Ibu
     
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  35. Arawn_3

    Arawn_3 New User

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    Wow, I don't know bout the older guys here, but for the younger guys (20 and below) it's definitely not a good idea to be popping pills like that before play. I'm 18 as well, I train 6x a week at a good 4-5 hours a day and play at a very high level (play futures and stuff) and I never in my life have taken any kind of pills before I played a match or had practice. I have taken some anti-inflammatory pills while recovering from injury but that's about it.

    With a proper warm-up (around 10-15 minutes) before picking up a racket, then starting slowly when hitting balls to warm up, along with a proper cool down jog and stretching of roughly 30 minutes afterwards is all you need to not experience any soreness while playing. Only injury I had in last year and half is a groin injury that happened last week but that was more because I slid out and strained it, it healed already though.

    I realise many people don't have the time to go through all of this, but if it's possible, make time for it. It'll help a LOT and you won't have to be popping pills to avoid aches and pains.
     
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  36. Nuke

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    Ah, youth! Come back in 30 years and let us know if that's still working out for you.
     
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  37. mary fierce

    mary fierce Banned

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    Don't confuse warm-up with protection. It may lessen risk of muscle soreness but has no effect on the trauma your joints sustain (other than to add to it, of course).
     
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  38. Mark S. Hogan

    Mark S. Hogan Rookie

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    Going on 53 and have taken at least 600 mg daily for many, many years. Have them autopsy me to see the effects after I pass. :)
     
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  39. LuckyR

    LuckyR Legend

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    ...chortle...
     
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  40. Ronaldo

    Ronaldo G.O.A.T.

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    And how does Ibuprofen provide protection? Like, you feel nothing and easily allows more trauma, eh?
     
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  41. andfor

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    Already been done on live humans who took IBU's for years. Re: NBA's Alonzo Mourning and Sean Elliott. Maybe the lab results are public on their removed kidneys. I am sure there are others.
     
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  42. Zverev

    Zverev Professional

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    Hmmm..I thought that NSAIDs (which ibuprofen is a part of) tend to thin the blood, thus lowering the blood pressure, as well reducing probability of a stroke.
     
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  43. xtremerunnerars

    xtremerunnerars Hall of Fame

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    If you're not taking it to avoid pain in general, there can be a use for it.

    My injury doesn't get worse from playing, but there's always a constant nagging. The ibuprofen is just to dull it a little. I know it's there, and if i do somethign to tweak it, then i stop.

    I definitely wouldn't take mass quantities just to feel like superman, though.
     
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  44. Ronaldo

    Ronaldo G.O.A.T.

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    Ibuprofen may reduce the blood pressure-lowering effects of drugs that are given to reduce blood pressure. This may occur because prostaglandins play a role in the regulation of blood pressure. When ibuprofen is used in combination with aminoglycosides (e.g., gentamicin) the blood levels of the aminoglycoside may increase, presumably because the elimination of aminoglycosides from the body is reduced. This may lead to aminoglycoside-related side effects. Individuals taking oral blood thinners or anticoagulants (e.g., warfarin) should avoid ibuprofen because ibuprofen also thins the blood, and excessive blood thinning may lead to bleeding.
     
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  45. xtremerunnerars

    xtremerunnerars Hall of Fame

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    I may be crazy, but doesn't ibuprofen have a warning like that on the back of it?
     
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  46. El Diablo

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    Wrong twice in one sentence, I'm afraid. Firstly, drugs that are anticoagulants, or "blood thinners," do not reduce blood pressure. Coumadin, heparin, aspirin etc., all anticoagulants, do not reduce blood pressure. Elevation of blood pressure is a familiar and well known side effect of ibuprofen. Secondly, ibuprofen is not a significant anticoagulant. If it were you'd see the Advil and Motrin people trying to get a piece of the baby aspirin market for prevention of heart attack and stroke. But you don't see that. The concerns about bleeding on ibuprofen have nothing to do with "blood thinning," i.e. anticoagulation. Rather, it has to do with 1) direct gastrointestinal irritation that can lead to GI bleeding, and 2) very rare suppression of the bone marrow, possible with many drugs, that can reduce the production of platelets and lead to bleeding for that reason.
     
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  47. Ronaldo

    Ronaldo G.O.A.T.

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    Could be, cannot read such small print anymore
     
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  48. andfor

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    Warning! I am an example of this. Be careful. I ended up having to have a lower GI exam due to bleeding that could only be attributed to taking IBU's. That's as far as I'll go there. Use your imagination for the rest.

    Arm-chair pharmacy can be hazardous to your health. I am surprised none of our medical friends have not jumped in here. Consult your doctor please before undertaking any ongoing personal drug therapies.

    Keep in mind, just because you can buy medication over the counter does not mean it's entirely safe.
     
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  49. Zverev

    Zverev Professional

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    Thanks for valuable information, guys.
     
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  50. You cannot be serious !!!

    You cannot be serious !!! Rookie

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    Regular use of antiinflammatory medication (NSAIDS) increases risk of

    GI bleeding, gastritis, ulcers
    Kidney failure
    Strokes
    Heart attacks
    Lots of other things but these are the main ones

    especially if you are over 40 and are taking them regularly, at a higher than recommended or near maximum dose, for a prolonged period of time.

    Also, the way NSAIDS increases blood pressure is by acting on the blood vesses and the kidney. NSAIDs are an anti-platelet so it reduces your ability to clot as well. This together with increased blood pressure can increase the risk of strokes.

    With any drugs there is always a risk. Google the "wonderdrug" - Vioxx and see what you can find out about it and why it was taken all the market. Vioxx is in the same class of drugs as NSAIDs.

    Bottom line - warm up, warm down, stretch, have a hot bath or a massage but do not resort to popping pills to alleviate muscular and joint pain. We all saw what happened to Justine in the Finals of the French Open last year - she took an NSAID before the match, cost her the tournament !

    If you have an injury such as tennis elbow, or a joint condition then its a whole new ball game. No punt intended. You might be taking these medications anyway as prescribed by your doctor, or you should be consulting your doctor or therapist. But they should not be used to increase performance.

    If you have to take medications for sports pains, save them for the bad days, so take them on a "need to" basis, but definitely not regularly and not exceeding the recommended does. Listen to your body - its trying to tell you something.
     
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