Relative tension between strings immidiately after stringing?

Discussion in 'Strings' started by pmata814, Oct 6, 2006.

  1. pmata814

    pmata814 Professional

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    I'm new to stringing. Last night, after stringing my Diablo MP with PSGD 16 @ 60lbs., I took a tension meter and used it to check the relative tension between each string. They were off by quite a bit. For example, the cross in the middle of the racquet measured 33 then the next cross 23 and continued to vary erratically. The mains weren't off by that much; however, they were much tighter than the crosses at 44. I never checked the tension on the racquets when strung by the shop but I assume this is not normal. Or is the tension supposed to even out only after hitting with the racquet?

    I use an Alpha Axis Pro. I (literally) count between 8 to 10 seconds before clamping each string after tensioning it. I tried to be as precise as possible. I don't think the string was slipping because at one point I marked it with a sharpie and did not see the mark move until after I released the clamp. I haven't played with the racquet so I don't know how it's going to feel but still...I would like to improve my consistency from string to string. What am I doing wrong? Can someone help with this please? Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated. Thanks!
     
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  2. LttlElvis

    LttlElvis Professional

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    What you are experiencing is not uncommon. Measure the string tension right after stringing, then one hour later without hitting, and you will get tension loss. Even more on the more flexable strings.

    Using a crank is all about consistency. Waiting 8 to 10 seconds is fine if you are consistant about it. Sting tension actually slowly decreases then levels off. Try using a digital fish scale and experiment. You will be amazed at how the quickly the tension drops right after lockout. This is due to string stretch.

    To get consistency using a crank, 1.) use a slow even consistent crank motion and 2.) initial tension head location should be as far from the racquet as possible and preferably at the same starting point each time.

    Once you get your own consistent system, you will have consistent results.

    Now accuracy is a whole different story. LOL.
     
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  3. pmata814

    pmata814 Professional

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    First of all thanks for the response. I know tension loss is normal but is it normal for the tension to be so different from string to string? Shouldn't the loss of tension be uniform throughout the stringbed?
     
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  4. Swissv2

    Swissv2 Hall of Fame

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    no, Loss of tension happens differently through the racquet.
     
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  5. SW Stringer

    SW Stringer Semi-Pro

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    I've got a suggestion that will speed up your stringing time by 5 minutes . . . clamp off as soon as the tensioning head locks out. Waiting is simply a waste of time . . . the tension head will not re-pull if you wait. Clamping off quickly will add consistency to your string job . . . and speed it up.

    The cross strings lose tension at the grommets and at every junction with a main string due to friction . . . so tension is the highest at the grommet nearest the tension head, and lowest at the other end just past the clamp. Since you pull cross strings on alternate sides comparing adjacent cross string tensions will show large differences near the hoop and nearly equal tensions between mains 1L and 1R.
     
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  6. pmata814

    pmata814 Professional

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    Actually...I was told, by Alpha, that the tension head on a crank sort of "gives" a little after it locks out. I confirmed this when I calibrated the machine by watching as the calibrator lowers in tenison after the tenison head locks out. I was advised to wait between 8-10 seconds before clamping. This way--I suppose--I allow the string to relax a bit before clamping it. If I do this on every string shouldn't it help with the consistency? I knew I would lose tension like this which is why I strung @ 60 lbs. rather than my usual 58 lbs. Is this reasoning incorrect?
     
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  7. LttlElvis

    LttlElvis Professional

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    I agree with SW Stringer in that by waiting, the tension head does not re-pull.

    If you are waiting 8-10 sec because you want to get approx. 58lbs and stringing tensions is set at 60 lbs., then I think this is a good consistent method, and your thoughts are reasonable. Just as long as you are always doing this. Remember, if you string for other people, your 60 lbs. better be the same all the time. It may be different than someone else's 60 lbs., but you better have consistent results. Waiting 10 sec (actually more) is really a good method for drop weight stringers.

    This is why I said accuracy was a whole different story. For me, electronic constant pull has given me the most consistent and accurate results.
     
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  8. pmata814

    pmata814 Professional

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    correction.

    I'm sorry. I was talking to Mark at Alpha and it turned out I had misunderstood his instructions. What he originally said was that you should try to clamp within 8 seconds (as quickly as possible) not to wait for 8 seconds then clamp. Misunderstanding on my part. Just thought I should clear that up. Thank you for all your help.
     
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  9. gotwheels

    gotwheels Semi-Pro

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    The actual string tension is in the range of 30% lower than your stringing reference tension after stringing varying by stringing machine, technique, and string. This tension loss stabilizes at about 16 hours, and then continues at a slower rate with use. As others have said, consistency in application (with calibrated equipment) is the key.
     
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