return of serve

Discussion in 'Tennis Tips/Instruction' started by taurussable, Aug 28, 2014.

  1. taurussable

    taurussable Professional

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    on the forehand side, is the lack of pat the dog position simply because of the shortened back swing? or is there something intentional about it?
     
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  2. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    On fast serves, the returns are more blocks than groundies, so no pat the dog.
    On slower serves, if the returner has the time, full swing and pat the dog.
    On real fast serves, where the returner is holding conti grip to chip/block, it's a shortenned volley stroke.
     
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  3. taurussable

    taurussable Professional

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    makes a lot of sense. thanks LeeD. :)
     
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  4. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    To beat an already dead horse....
    The PTD part is done behind you, towards the back of the court.
    On ROS, unless it's going 80- you take a shortenned backswing only out to the side of your body, not behind you.
     
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  5. spaceman_spiff

    spaceman_spiff Hall of Fame

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    Even when you're driving through a fast serve rather than blocking it back, less wrist action (i.e., a slower racket head) on the swing means that the racket face spends more time in the contact zone, widening your margin for error.

    If you whip the racket through the contact zone against a fast serve and get the timing slightly off, you'll probably frame the ball or miss your shot by a wide margin. If you drive through the ball and get the timing slightly wrong, you'll hit off-center but your shot will probably still go in.
     
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  6. taurussable

    taurussable Professional

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    This makes a lot of sense. When I feel too much slack in the wrist or too much racket lag, it is usually a bad return of serve. Thanks for the excellent explanation.
     
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  7. hawk eye

    hawk eye Hall of Fame

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    The solution might very well be patting the already dead horse and beating the dog. There you have it.
     
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