Rios retires at 28

Discussion in 'General Pro Player Discussion' started by Justyn Daniell, Jul 16, 2004.

  1. Justyn Daniell

    Justyn Daniell New User

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    #1
  2. Feña14

    Feña14 Legend

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    Poor Awright, I believe he was a big fan of his.

    I am also upset that I won't be able to see him again, and it's a shame the way that he had to go out.
     
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  3. pound cat

    pound cat G.O.A.T.

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    Another character gone from the ATP. Really too bad that it ended with injury. The one time I saw him play was v Safin at TMS Canada, and he was suffering from a knee problem. I had no idea he's won 18 titles. He will be missed.
     
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  4. Tim Tiger Henman

    Tim Tiger Henman Rookie

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    I had the pleasure of seeing Rios up close and personal on the practice courts on the first Monday of Wimbledon '98. He was eyeballing me (I think because I was wearing a tennis shirt).

    I saw a lot of great tennis names that day - but he had an aura about him.

    Its a sad day for tennis.
     
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  5. VamosRafa

    VamosRafa Hall of Fame

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    I'm not a Rios fan. But I'll admit he's a character. And he was a great shot-maker. (Perhaps in more ways than one. :wink:)

    But talk about someone who was not nice. Folks here complain about Andy Roddick being a jerk on court, and nice guy off-court.

    Well, Rios was consistent with his jerki-ness. A very unpleasant fellow all-around.

    And a bit of an underachiever as well.

    Susan
     
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  6. rommil

    rommil Legend

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    Rios will be missed(even though he has not played lately).
    In response to Susan's take on Rios and Roddick, my take on it was that Rios did not care if you liked him or not. My take on Roddick is that he tries sometimes to be cutesy and then he breaks out in these on court tirades. Im not saying Rios was better but with his crabby attitude and all, he just left it to people to like him or not to like him.
     
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  7. The Franchise

    The Franchise Rookie

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    Sorry to hijack this post, but I can more identify with Roddick since sometimes I'm a super nice guy and sometimes I'm a big a**hole. I don't really see a problem with that, but perhaps some people do. To each his own I suppose.
     
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  8. AAAA

    AAAA Hall of Fame

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    What you see is what you get with Rios. Roddick has a sense of facade about him("Grow a spine", "Captain Obvious", etc, etc).
     
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  9. Go Tennis

    Go Tennis Rookie

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    Humm... I'm sory, Susan, but, maybe, just maybe, I think Nadal hasn't future in tennis:(
     
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  10. Go Tennis

    Go Tennis Rookie

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    Humm... I'm sory, Susan, but, maybe, just maybe, I think Nadal hasn't future in tennis.
     
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  11. devila

    devila Banned

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    Rios was petulant and couldn't really appreciate tennis and its fans.
    He didn't understand that showing up and giving up quickly, for no reason, was disrespectful. He was often rude in interviews. When he was beaten, he insulted some opponents.
    When he had success, his head swelled up even more.

    Roddick was allowed to emulate immature behaviour of other athletes. He said he was told to always be sportsmanlike.
    There's the problem. Sometimes, he exaggerated in interviews and sounded condescending when he tried way too hard to be nice.
    If your opponent doesn't want to hear you ask if he's alright or see you applaud his good shots repeatedly, you should stop irritating him.
     
    #11
  12. tomahawk

    tomahawk New User

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    I will always remember Marcelo Rios as a great shotmaker. Also, he is one guy, other that Pete Sampras, that gave Andre Agassi problems. It just seemed that Agassi always had a hard time against Rios because he was a lefty and he was an amazing shotmaker. Plus I just think that Rios matched up well against Agassi.
     
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  13. edge

    edge Banned

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    Rios had a similar styled game to Agassi but was quicker, more athletic and hit through the ball cleaner. He dominated Agassi but had a weaker resolve.
     
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  14. irishbanger

    irishbanger Rookie

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    It was always fun to listen to Cliff Drysdale talk about Rios. At some point, Rios shunned Cliff, and whenever Cliff broadcast a Rios match he always brought it up and could barely conceal his loathing for Rios while at the same time marveling at his game. I understand Rios came from a wealthy family and never needed tennis. It showed.
     
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  15. Sean Dugan

    Sean Dugan Rookie

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    A great player with a very bad attitude at times. Made it all the way to number one in 1998, and then fired his coach (Larry Stefanki). Marcelo was a bit of a head case........remember his incident in Italy?....when he got in a barfight with some cops. (I hope he had backup because he weighs about a buck forty.) ;o) I remember him playing Korda in the AO final in 98......but Petr was on fire that day and smoked him in three sets. And I remember him pushing Agassi around at the Lipton later that year. He made some incredible shots in that match. AA played well, but Rios was just in a zone that day. He was a c0cky little sh*t who rubbed many a reporter the wrong way......and they paid him back by bad mouthing him every chance they got. But, he could probably be elected King of Chile if he wanted to be. Don't know if he was as rude to his fans as he was to reporters. Maybe he just didn't like the press much. You can't blame him for that. ;o) Marcelo wasn't exactly a PR genius.....not a smarmy kinda guy who has press management down cold. Rude yes, but genuine as well......he didn't bother with the act when the cameras and mikes were in his face. Wasn't his style. He was sincerely rude. ;o) Whenever I think of beautiful footwork, Rios in his prime will come to mind. Nasty swing serve in ad, and he could place his serve well. And for a little guy, 5'8"ish, he clocked the ball pretty damn well. Was a big deal for a year or two, got the big Nike endorsment, and then the injuries came. Lots of back problems. Never really was the same again. One of the biggest problems men's tennis has is that all its best players have shot their wad by age thirty (with the exception of Conners and Agassi.) Because it is an individual sport there is just nowhere to hide. You lose a step, and you are toast. There is scant difference between the top ten and a guy who is ranked 257. A few points a set. A service break here and there. Very Darwinistic. Anyway, when he wasn't tanking, Marcello was a very entertaining player to watch. Another great one bites the dust.
     
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  16. Ballmachine

    Ballmachine Semi-Pro

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    Marcelo was the Kafelnikov and Safin of his day. Tons of talent, but very low on heart. Rios truly didn't care if he won or lost, and I was disgusted many times after witnessing him tank matches. I actually got a chance to see Marcelo practice the week before the Open in 2001, and I had to do a double take because he was actually smiling on the court. He was playing with friends, and they appeared to be laughing and having a great time. I believe that was the only time I ever saw the man smile in his whole career.

    Rios played a great match against Michael Chang at the U.S. Open in 1997, which he lost. However, after watching that match, I knew that this guy had loads of talent and I would be seeing a lot more of him. After that, Marcelo reached the finals of the next grandslam in the 1998 Australian Open. Sadly, he was very nervous and couldn't get it going against a hot Petr Korda. In perhaps the best match I ever saw Rios play, he destroyed Agassi in the 1998 Lipton final. Unfortunately, Rios never did much to talk about after that. Injuries took their toll, but I believe that his poor work ethic and training methods ultimately led to the injuries that cut his career short. Today, Marat Safin is headed on the same path. It is very sad when players with so much talent, never fulfill their promise. Marcelo Rios will be remembered as a miserable guy that reached the number 1 ranking in men's tennis without ever winning a grandslam title.
     
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  17. @wright

    @wright Hall of Fame

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    I have mixed feelings about the retirement of Rios. On one hand, we are losing a player that could have achieved so much more than he did. On the other hand, I am relieved that Rios is now free of the painful process of trying to come back and having injury upon injury. He is a small guy at 5'8, but had as big a game as any player, with a serve as effective as some players six inches taller. His bread and butter play in his serves games was the waaaaaaay out wide serve, followed by a winner down the line. He could work this all day long (when he was on!) against anyone. He had the smoothest two hander of any player I've seen, he could just do anything with it, heavy top, flat, sidespin, and it looked beautifully effortless every time. He could really crank the fuzz off the ball off both sides, but he was great at changing the pace with slice, drop shots, and he wasn't afraid to come into the net. Rios in his prime was incredible to watch, his anticipation, court sense, and movement game him a texture to his game that I don't think I've seen in anyone else.ever. If you would watch him move, he would always head over to where his opponent's ball was going, before the guy would hit it, making it look like Rios wasn't working hard at all out there. It all came together at the '98 Lipton where Rios could get to #1 if he won the tournament, facing Henman in the semis and a red-hot Agassi in the finals. Henman was no match for Rios in the semis, being broken in the first game of the match. Henman and Rios were actually pretty close, often hanging out and practicing together. Rios sure didn't treat Henman like a friend in that match, resorting to his opponent's own game and serve/volleying after he had the match firmly in his control. Next up was Agassi who said "if Rios can Dr. Feelgood my power, then he's too good". Agassi obviously knew Rios was a tough customer, but I think he got more than he bargained for that day. Rios took it to him the whole match without as much as a gasp of a let-up. Rios was pounding away at Agassi's groundies, hitting impossible angles and just demolishing Agassi from every direction. Nerves didn't come into the equation for Rios by any stretch of the mind during the davis cup/soccer type atmosphere. Rios' dad ran down onto the court after the last ball was hit, hugging Rios as the tears flowed. Next down was Rios' girlfriend, who it seemed like he kind of ignored, believably so after the biggest win of his career. The best part was his ensuing interview with Mary Carillo. Rios gave her the cold shoulder, answering many of her questions with one-word answers. It was obvious he didn't like her. Anyone who hasn't seen this match, I highly recommend it, especially if you want to see someone thump Agassi at his own game. You just have to see it to be able to appreciate Rios. It really is a shame that his career was cut so short, because his game worked on all surfaces. As much as he hated grass, he could have adjusted to it if he would have wanted to. There was a great article on him in '98 or '99 when he was on the cover of Tennis Magazine. A special player, who will not be forgotten. I hear his name mentioned by commentators in at least half of all the tennis matches I watch on tv.
     
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  18. @wright

    @wright Hall of Fame

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    Oh, one more thing, someone mentioned wondering whether he was nicer to fans than the media, he was often very rude to fans, giving children the cold shoulder and rarely signing autographs. During the '98 Lipton, they showed a clip of Rios visiting a children's hospital with some other players, and the commentators were noting how he seemed touched by the experience and was in disbelief that he meant so much to the kids. I was quite surprised because the whole episode seemed pretty out of character for him.
     
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  19. drakulie

    drakulie Talk Tennis Guru

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    Overrated player, with a crappy attitude. Good-riddense.
     
    #19
  20. Tim Tiger Henman

    Tim Tiger Henman Rookie

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    @wright - just wanted to say I loved reading your posts. I will definitely keep an eye out for that match.
     
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  21. @wright

    @wright Hall of Fame

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    Muchas Gracias, Tim.
     
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  22. VamosRafa

    VamosRafa Hall of Fame

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    Why be sorry about it? If that's your opinion, fine. I think Rafa will prove you wrong, but there's lots of tennis to be played before his career is done (hopefully). And since he is playing ATP/ITF events on a regular basis (including main draws in Toronto, Cincy, Olympics, Sopot, Long Island and U.S. Open this summer), I'd say he's already showing that his "future" as well as his "present" is in tennis.

    But I can guarantee, he will never be as mean and grouchy as Rios. If he is, I'll kick his butt. :lol:

    Sometimes what goes around comes around, and I think that's what happened with Mr. Rios and his career.
     
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