Rotator Cuff Problem

Discussion in 'Health & Fitness' started by janm, Aug 30, 2012.

  1. Pacific lefty

    Pacific lefty Rookie

    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2011
    Messages:
    272
    Location:
    Europe
    Oh, and JanM, are you not falling a little to the side at the end of your serve. Keep an eye on that. You should probably be moving forward. My coach put his racquet down right in the spot where I like to fall and made me serve that way to eliminate being off balance and to get a more secure footing...
     
    #51
  2. janm

    janm Rookie

    Joined:
    Sep 5, 2009
    Messages:
    101
    Hi Panic Lefty
    Yeah I'm slowly tweaking my serve little by little, thanks for highlighting that for me. I will try to work on that.
     
    #52
  3. charliefedererer

    charliefedererer Legend

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2009
    Messages:
    5,639
    Your serve technique doing more harm than good? by the Bollettieri Camp "Serve Doctor", Pat Dougherty:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GgdXawklcZk

    Main point: You need to "aim your chest at the ball" more - do this by bending more from the knees with the heels well off the court as you get into your trophy position:

    [​IMG]


    The feeling you will have is more like doing a squat rather than just bending your knees. By that, it will feel like you are lowering your whole body weight down.
    To maintain your balance, keep your tossing arm pointed straight up as long as possible.
    To maintain your balance, lower yourself continuously (never pausing), until you begin the leg push off to start the serve. [A falling body is quite stable, it is only when stopping that it would feel difficult to balance.]

    When do you do this?
    Check out the following sequence of Sampras:

    [​IMG]

    Notice it is only after his tossing arm is straight up in pic 4 that he begins to squat down (bend his knees), bringing his heels off the ground.

    Notice that as the result of this set up into his trophy pose, his chest is more aimed up at the ball at impact.












    Preventing Rotator Cuff Injury. TennisOne.com Editor Jim McLennan explains some serving techniques to generate power and protect your shoulder. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lTRvxaBMh8s


    The fact that you are falling off to the right is proof that you don't have enough shoulder over shoulder cartwheel action.
    [If you did, your shoulder over shoulder cartwheel action would throw your straight into the court.]

    Again, getting into the correct trophy pose with your tossing arm straight up will help you.

    But you will need to let your front hip extend more out into the court in order to maintain your balance as you get lower and lower in your squat if your tossing arm is up with a steep shoulder angle.
    [That is because your upper body weight being tilted to the back fence as you form the "archer's bow" means your hip has to counterweight this upper body tilt.]

    You can see how Pete gets his body shaped "like a bow" very late in the above sequence in pics 7-8, just before his final trophy position.

    [Will Hamilton emphasizes this in the following video: Tennis Lesson: Serve Tips: Lead with the Hip http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HgeYmEScfgQ

    Also sliding the hip forward as you get to the trophy position is a prominent feature of Nick Bollettieri-Sonic Serve.wmv http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ajoZ0f7hw-A ]


    You can also see how Pete has his hip forward at his trophy position in pic 1
    below:
    [​IMG]

    Once set up in this trophy position, Pete demonstrates the shoulder over shoulder action that Jim McLennan describes in his Preventing Rotator Cuff video.

    [And notice that doing this shoulder over shoulder cartwheel motion propels Pete forward, not falling off to the side as you are doing.]


    So good luck in working on your technique so you will not have an early recurrence in rotator cuff problems as you get back to tennis.

    Keep doing the thrower's ten exercises throughout your tennis career to also help avoid rotator cuff problems: http://www.muhlenberg.edu/pdf/main/athletics/athletic_training/throwers10.pdf



    Good luck!
     
    #53
  4. janm

    janm Rookie

    Joined:
    Sep 5, 2009
    Messages:
    101
    charliefedererer thanks for that post, its really answered a lot of questions about how to get a knee bend for me.

    I always feel unstable when trying to bend my knees, thats why I can never quite do it. I think i tried to hold a bit whilst at the lowest position of the bend whilst the ball got back down to my hitting position from the toss.

    Looking at the above I don't think I was loading up right either. My look like a banana but the opposite way to how it should be. I think this is because of no knee bend.

    As a result of this I just abandoned trying to jump as I was just messing my serve up a lot of times.

    As soon as i'm up to it i'll try and work towards what you guys suggest and post a new vid/sequence.

    thanks so much
     
    #54
  5. charliefedererer

    charliefedererer Legend

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2009
    Messages:
    5,639
    Glad to help.

    Taking as much stress off the shoulder by getting the shoulder into the right position in the trophy position and through the hitting phase is quite important.

    Unfortunately, the most players think of reaching up as straight as possible on the serve.

    I think you can see how jammed/impinged the shoulder joint looks in pic 4 below when the arm is straight up, and you don't "drop the left shoulder".

    [​IMG]

    But the leaning that the pros and better players do lets the shoulder move with much less stress than the more vertical position most use. The position of the shoulder joint is more open as in pic 3.


    But even pic 3 is an overestimation of the position of the shoulder angle on the best servers.

    The shoulder angle is actually even lower! - like in the following pic of Sam Stosur - or if you go back to my previous posts and follow the shoulder angles through the Sampras serve.

    Look closely, her arm sticking almost straight out from her side, with a shoulder angle only slightly more than 90 degrees ... made possible by her "dropping her left shoulder".

    [​IMG]


    Other pictures of contact that emphasize how little angle there is between the humerus (arm bone) and the line across the top of the shoulders, largely due to "dropping the left shoulder" as Jim McLellan advised:

    Andy Roddick:

    [​IMG]

    Kim Clijsters:

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Oct 5, 2012
    #55
  6. janm

    janm Rookie

    Joined:
    Sep 5, 2009
    Messages:
    101
    Thats beautifully illustrated, the shoulder drop in some of those pics is a lot more the what I thought. Its another thing i need to add to the list.
     
    #56
  7. Chas Tennis

    Chas Tennis Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2011
    Messages:
    4,263
    Location:
    Baltimore, MD
    Last edited: Oct 5, 2012
    #57
  8. Chas Tennis

    Chas Tennis Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2011
    Messages:
    4,263
    Location:
    Baltimore, MD
    1) Lumbar Lateral Flexion. One of the main body orientations to achieve the shoulder orientation is

    lumbar lateral flexion - this is a side-bending of the spine and I believe is often spoken of as a 'trunk side bend'.

    2) Scapular Repositioning? The scapula also might be repositioning to some degree to minimize impingement. ?? See last seconds of the video viewing from the back and showing the scapular motion. There would not be much scaplular elevation or it would conflict, I guess, with the advice in the Ellenbecker video. ?
    http://anatomy.umms.med.umich.edu/anatomy_new/html/modules/upper_limb_module/upper_limb_05.html

    3) What Part is Played in the Serve.? An interesting discussion from the Manual of Structural Kinesiology indicates that -

    The lat & teres major are stretched when the shoulder is externally rotated while in a 90° abducted state (90° of shoulder abduction is the approximate orientation when the leg thrust occurs). The reference discusses how the shoulder may be farther stretched by laterally flexing and rotating the trunk.

    CF, This elevate-the-shoulder motion might follow the 'chest up' that you have pointed out in some replies as important for a strong serve?

    This last observation indicates that the lateral flexing may not only be for avoiding shoulder impingement but also to play an important part in the service motion.
     
    Last edited: Oct 5, 2012
    #58

Share This Page