rules question, threw racquet over the net.

Discussion in 'Adult League & Tournament Talk' started by yonexpurestorm, Aug 21, 2011.

  1. yonexpurestorm

    yonexpurestorm Rookie

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    today in my doubles league match i had something happen that ive never seen before and was wondering anyone knew the rule on this.

    my opponent had hit a short ball for an easy put away right next to the net. i saw it bouncing and went for a big smash cause i enjoy hitting the ball over the fence. instead of the awsome smash i was invisioning in my head my racquet slipped and i threw it over the net. however, i hit the ball on my side of the net for a clean winner and my racquet didnt touch the net at all. i know you can swing over the net as long as you hit the ball on your side and dont touch the net, but i have never thrown my racquet over. nobody knew the ruling so we just replayed the point. does anyone know what the ruling should have been.
     
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  2. tamdoankc

    tamdoankc Rookie

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    Point is still ongoing while the ball is still in play. If your racquet landed on your opponent's side before the ball has bounced twice or is still in play then your opponent should be awarded the point. Whether it would've been a winner or not is subjective.
     
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  3. yonexpurestorm

    yonexpurestorm Rookie

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    hmmmm..... not sure if the ball had bounced twice yet. it seems unlikely that the ball could have bounced twice before my racquet hit the ground. well i guess this is good to know next time i decide to throw my racquet over the net.
     
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  4. Bud

    Bud Bionic Poster

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    It should have been your opponent's point.

    Also, don't act like a dbag and intentionally smash the ball so hard that it bounces over the fence. If you did that against me, you'd be fetching the ball when you changed sides :)
     
    Last edited: Aug 22, 2011
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  5. Big_Dangerous

    Big_Dangerous Legend

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    The racket has to be in your hands when you hit, you can't throw it up to hit a ball. That's illegal.

    If you hit the ball and then the racket slipped out, then it's your point, but if it slipped out of your hands before you hit it, then it's your opponents point.

    Jimmy Connors intentionally tried this to be a hot dog and he automatically lost the point.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fHk3KEGF5mI
     
    Last edited: Aug 22, 2011
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  6. j00dypoo

    j00dypoo Rookie

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    bud is correct. that would be your opponents point. I once had my opponents racquet peg me during a volley exchange and he tried to call a let... I did not 'let' him get away with it.

    big_dangerous must misunderstand the scenario.
     
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  7. J_R_B

    J_R_B Hall of Fame

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    Even if it hit on the other side after the ball bounced twice, the opponent has grounds to call a hinderance and claim the point.
     
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  8. dizzlmcwizzl

    dizzlmcwizzl Hall of Fame

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    Your racket cannot touch the net or the opponents court during play. It sounds like it did and should be their point. I suspect if your racket hit outside the playing surface it would be ok.

    However, dropping your racket is not grounds for a hinderance ... throwing it maybe however.
     
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  9. JLyon

    JLyon Hall of Fame

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    dropping racket on accident or slipping is not grounds for a hinderance, now if your racket invaded your opponent's court with a live ball it is your opponent's point. Now if the racket landed outside the doubles lines or singles sticks you could make a case for your point as you did not invade the opponent's court, one could actually touch the net if singles sticks are being used as long as it is outside of the singles sticks.
     
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  10. tennis tom

    tennis tom Hall of Fame

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    This makes sense, if the racket lands in your opponent's court or maybe even within the feaseible playing perimeter, within the fences, where an opponent may step on it overrunning after reaching a ball. BUT, it sounds like in this case, the ball was unreturnable by the opponent. In an umpired match, the official would make the call but with no umpire, the players would have to decide if the shot was unreturnable, let the fun begin. This is an interesting situation, I'm looking forward to the official ruling, this situation will probably come up for me before I die.
     
    Last edited: Aug 22, 2011
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  11. yonexpurestorm

    yonexpurestorm Rookie

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    they were both running back in preparation for my smash so i dont think there was a hinderance. but it seems that the ruling should have been their point because my racquet hit their side of the court while the ball was still in play because it hadnt bounced twice ending the point yet. oh well, it was the first point in a game and im sure my opponents wont lose any sleep over it.
     
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  12. kylebarendrick

    kylebarendrick Professional

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    Per the rules of tennis paragraph 24: The player loses the point if
     
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  13. tennis tom

    tennis tom Hall of Fame

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    Thanks! That seems to cover it. Am I correct in saying, that if you drop the racket accidentally, on your side of the net, and it doesn't touch any of those things, you can pick it up and continue playing?
     
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  14. mucat

    mucat Hall of Fame

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    Your opponent could call a let.
     
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  15. woodrow1029

    woodrow1029 Guest

    Correct

    Unless your opponent deliberately throws his racket, you can't call a let for a hindrance with your opponent's racket coming out of his hand.
     
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  16. mucat

    mucat Hall of Fame

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    I thought this is similar to a ball drop out of your opponent's pocket? Is there a rule reference for this?


    Add: I found it http://www.usta.com/Improve-Your-Game/Rules/Rulings/Falling_down_during_a_point/
    However, I also find this: http://www.livestrong.com/article/266647-tennis-rules-on-falling/
    Obviously, the link from USTA is correct. But interestly, the page from livestrong has a link reference to the USTA page...

    Thanks woodrow for correcting me.
     
    Last edited: Aug 22, 2011
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  17. beernutz

    beernutz Hall of Fame

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    LOL at the Livestrong article. You don't have to be an expert to post articles there and they are as a result all over the board in terms of accuracy. In fact, it appears from reading the article written by this author that you don't even have to play the game you are writing about. It is funny that tennis isn't even listed in her little bio section.
     
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  18. beernutz

    beernutz Hall of Fame

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    Double post.
     
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