Sean Hannity Vs Usta

Discussion in 'Junior League & Tournament Talk' started by HIGH-TECH TENNIS, Jun 26, 2012.

  1. HIGH-TECH TENNIS

    HIGH-TECH TENNIS Rookie

    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2010
    Messages:
    146
    When we met Tom Walker last March at the National Spring Chps in Mobile, he was very, very concerned about upcoming changes. When he asked, we quickly agreed to put together video ab...out that tournament, which will be ELIMINATED entirely off the face of the earth as of 2013.

    We sent this clip (plus his CALL TO ACTION) to 3000 tennis enthusiasts.

    We're in the trenches every single week with junior tennis players all over the south. We've probably talked about this issue with HUNDREDS of players, parents, coaches, directors. I can promise you that absolutely NO ONE supports the changes... :(
     
  2. HIGH-TECH TENNIS

    HIGH-TECH TENNIS Rookie

    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2010
    Messages:
    146
    EVERYONE vs. USTA...AND THE BEAT GOES ON!
    Tennis is a GAME, not brain surgery, and junior players are CHILDREN, not mini-professionals. How is it possible that the future of this amazing sport has exploded into a full-fledged WAR??????

    It's getting pretty tiresome (or maybe it's even BEYOND tiresome) to keep track of all the back and forth between passionate advocates (Wayne Bryan, Tom Walker, Sean Hannity) who are trying desperately to use their sizable voices to speak UP on behalf of junior tennis players...and the USTA. Players, parents, coaches, directors, and even the host of a conservative radio/tv show have all joined to form a UNITED FRONT but clearly, the USTA is not in the mood to listen, much less revise their plans. In the interest of keeping customers informed, we've included a few links here for you. As you might imagine, this topic and specifically Sean Hannity's response has generated many, many comments. Consider just one example:

    "The point here is that by eliminating such possibilities, you (USTA) are severely handicapping the ability of every player, parent and coach to judge and decide what is in the player's best developmental interests, both in the short term and the long term. Instead, the USTA has taken upon itself to determine what that competitive "pathway" is going to be. Unfortunately, it doesn't stop there. I see the same flawed thinking in other areas of junior player development; namely, the USTA's banning of players younger than eleven using proper equipment with which to compete in sanctioned tournament play. Why? Because the "we know best" mentalities have, with the stroke of a bureaucratic pen, made it impossible for someone like me, with a lifetime of tennis knowledge and experience at every level of the game to, as I've written elsewhere, act on my own observations, evaluations and conclusions and instead replace them with something that, in my view, is more conducive to anti-junior-development. The USTA has forced me into a position whereby to tell a precocious nine year old that in order to play tournaments he's going to have to play a dumbed down version of the game, for me, with his or her best interests at heart, would not only be absurd, it would be dishonest."

    Tom Walker Letter to Sean HannityWe were in Mobile in March when we met Tom Walker and first became aware of the massive changes that are coming to junior tennis. He was 1000% opposed to the changes then (and clearly he's moreso now - please take a moment to read his letter - in which he basically pleads with Sean Hannity to remain involved and help to save junior tennis in America). We were and are against these changes and not because this is our J-O-B. It's because we really do care about junior tennis players and we feel they will be hurt by these changes. We forwarded Tom Walker's CALL TO ACTION to approximately 3000 tennis enthusiasts in the southeast and we did our very best to inform players and parents so they could voice their opinions and they wouldn't be blindsided. When Tom asked us to quickly put together a video about the Spring National Championships (which has now been ELIMINATED from the face of the earth), we were happy to do so. We've personally talked with players, parents, coaches, and directors all over the south and we have YET to meet a person who supports the proposed changes. NOT A SINGLE ONE. :(

    Here are a few comments in response to Tom Walker's letter:

    "Tom Walker has a friend here. We have his back. How does shortening tournaments and eliminating competition help them to what is their only true goal of developing the next great American player?"

    "Tom Walker's letter is a passionate and thoughtful understanding of what actually happened. Do I think the USTA is going to give an inch , not a chance. As Tom states in his letter , the rabbit hole goes very deep. Too many top level USTA execs and their minions have to protect their personal interests to ever let things be debated and decided fairly."

    ‎"The USTA claims they want to set up the system to make it less expensive, shorten tournaments, and make more "local" play WHEN it actuality it all comes down to the USTA thinking they are in the player development business."

    I'm sure I don't have to remind you of the firestorm that spread last February when the awesome WAYNE BRYAN spoke UP on behalf of junior tennis players. If you're interested, HERE YOU GO. My offer to kiss Wayne Bryan ON THE LIPS still stands, LOL, and I'll gladly add Tom Walker to that list but Sean Hannity - I guess I'd just have to shake his hand!!!

    As you are probably aware, we've begun our efforts to move in many different directions - hope at least one of them will be successful and we can continue to help junior athletes use technology to their advantage. Tennis will always be our first love and we have a very special bond with loads of the players and parents we've met over the past 7 years - but tennis tournaments alone won't keep the lights on at HIGH-TECH TENNIS...especially tournaments that are limited to just SIXTEEN players!!! Keep your fingers crossed for the hardest-working couple you have ever known! :)
     
  3. tennisforlife77

    tennisforlife77 Rookie

    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2011
    Messages:
    102
    HTT - you seem technology minded - I'm not. Why not set up an online petition to suspend the 2014 changes until proper consultation takes place - get Hannity to get it out there ( he offered to pick up the tab for a survey) along with zootennis etc and see where we go...It's not that hard for these things to go viral quickly... someone needs to take the lead in terms of keeping the debate alive and keeping pressure on the USTA. Clearly they are just hoping this will all die down. Seems more productive than posting on boards like this..
     
  4. mythofthemetals

    mythofthemetals New User

    Joined:
    Jul 12, 2012
    Messages:
    17
    Rumor is that P. Mac will be at Hard Courts (one of them at least) to address concerns. Perhaps someone needs to address it in that forum as well. This is utterly ridiculous. USTA is acting like an out of control and out of touch organization. He is either part of the problem or the solution down the road. Not sure which. But his response seems to be that of a sycophant or out of touch figurehead.
     
  5. Tennishacker

    Tennishacker Professional

    Joined:
    Dec 31, 2009
    Messages:
    994
    Great video!

    My kids have been out of juniors for couple or years, but video brings back wonderful memories of all the local Thur national tournaments they have played.

    Keep up the good work!
     
  6. jonkras

    jonkras New User

    Joined:
    Jan 13, 2012
    Messages:
    38
    Actually, someone should start 2 petitions. same wording on both, except one says you are in favor of the changes, and one says you are against. Send an invite out listing both links so that each person can decide which one to sign. Then you can see how many are for/against the changes.
     
  7. floridakeys

    floridakeys New User

    Joined:
    Dec 10, 2007
    Messages:
    36
    I just read Sean Hannity's great response to Patrick McEnroe and Tim Russell and saw that the person quoted by High-Tech Tennis in an earlier post ("The point here is that by eliminating such possibilities, you (USTA) are severely handicapping the ability of every player, parent and coach...") is actually Chris Lewis, who has quite a few things to say on this issue in the comments section underneath Hannity's response.

    http://www.hannity.com/article/sean-responds-to-patrick-mcenroe/15786
     
  8. Pro_Tour_630

    Pro_Tour_630 Legend

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2004
    Messages:
    5,154
    Location:
    Connecticut
    you are in the trenches to make money, 92 videos out of 256 players is 35% hit rate, you made $45,000 at $500 a pop on this one tournament. Reducing the draw will reduce your hit rate there by reducing your revenue. Eliminating this tournament will net ZERO. The kids with real talent do not need videos to make them look good. SO this new change will put you out of business by 2014, am I wrong?
     
  9. tennisforlife77

    tennisforlife77 Rookie

    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2011
    Messages:
    102
    OK - so they've got some skin in the game - we all do in one form or another. Doesn't make his post any less relevant
     
  10. ClarkC

    ClarkC Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2008
    Messages:
    3,765
    Location:
    Charlottesville, VA
    I would think it would mean that the video company would seek business at the L2 and maybe L3 national tournaments.
     
  11. Pro_Tour_630

    Pro_Tour_630 Legend

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2004
    Messages:
    5,154
    Location:
    Connecticut
    quoting this is less relevant, as I scratch my head. :confused: you all know where I stand on this issue.

    every talented 9 year old I have seen can handle regulation U12, the top 35% of U10 are all playing in the 12’s, the rest throw them in Green RR.

    that is the point, the draw size is going to be smaller hence less players to prey on for video analysis ,and like I said the super talented players do not even need videos, coaches already know who they are.

    If the changes are a boom, then why is HTT complaining:confused:, they are going to make more money with the new changes,

    College coaches do not hate the change, they have been burnt by mediocracy kids with overinflated national ranking add high flying videos that make them look better than they really are :oops:

    fine, then HTT and the likes should welcome the change, more videos means more money, everyone is happy. :), only thing there is something called capitalism and market share, flying around from region to region costs money and eats away at revenue. By 2014 there will be local kids at regionals and sectionals that will create videos on their ipad4 at a fraction of the price using free dartfish like software with super slow motion,

    from your website, CURRENT RECORD:
    We sold 92 out of 98 videos recorded
    at the Spring Southern Closed (May 4-7, 2012).
    YAHOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO!


    92 X ok $450 each video your words not mine, equals $41,400, my bad, not bad for three days of shooting. But according to hannity the reduction is 75% which means 10g's instead of 40g's , you can not survive.

    no hidden agenda, I have a soon to be 10 year old just like you that is going to be affected by this change and I welcome the change, maybe I am the only realist in this rat race, others are delusional. Sure I can fly him around the country and inflate( more like deceive) his national ranking, but you know what, I am not going to do that, if he is good enough he will rise to the top, if not he stays at sectionals, end of story, even if he plays the same kids over and over again. If he does not like it and eventually gets bored, I can travel jr. ITF's with him. Too bad you live in Hawaii, the USTA is not going to please everyone, if you live in FL or hot beds you are not affected since there are plenty of players within 100 miles. OK OK you got me about my agenda, my kid is a September baby
     
    Last edited: Jul 31, 2012
  12. Pro_Tour_630

    Pro_Tour_630 Legend

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2004
    Messages:
    5,154
    Location:
    Connecticut
    Below are your two choices, you be the judge?

    What the USTA is trying to do is get more kids playing tennis with their ten and under program and with the 2014 changes the kids that deserve to rise to the top will.

    [​IMG]

    The old system where kids were dropping out of tennis because it was too difficult with regulation balls and serious competition at an early stage. And anyone with money is privy to national ranking. Notice the large noise at the bottom of the hmmmmm ............... experiment flask :) too much kids to find real talent.

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jul 31, 2012
  13. Alohajrtennis

    Alohajrtennis Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2012
    Messages:
    469
    I get it..it's the Highander strategy-- there can be only one!
     
  14. Pro_Tour_630

    Pro_Tour_630 Legend

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2004
    Messages:
    5,154
    Location:
    Connecticut
    Sorry about your feelings, but hannity your cheerleader, did challenge the system, and offered two answers. Favor the old system or the new one:confused:. I will create his poll for him. He owes me lots of money for proving that he is ,,,,,,,,,,,right :) but then again who gives meaning to polls they can be skewed anyway and do not represent everyone and every path.
     
    Last edited: Jul 31, 2012
  15. Alohajrtennis

    Alohajrtennis Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2012
    Messages:
    469
    And I thought I was cynical. Disclosure : I am not related to HTT, and I respect that he(?) can defend himself. However, why can't you believe that HTT actually cares about junior tennis and is not solely looking at this from a profit motive.

    And that's why TRN was born. Nature abhors a vacuum, they saw it and filled it. But TRN only works if there are head to head match ups to compare. The new system doesn't help with that, does it ? Hey, Dallas - you think all the new changes are great right ? Oh, never mind, you wouldn't care what he thought, he's just another one of those greedy capitalistic pigs 'preying' - your words, not mine - on the ignorant insane tennis parents.


    Why wait until to 2014, I can do that now. But I'm a geek (hence the late night posts). Some tennis parents aren't, so some of them made need a service like HTT. At a cost of abut 1-2 months private lessons, or a trip to the opens, or 18 minutes at a private academy, it seems like a low-risk investment for the technology inept. Whatever, when I envision the owner of HTT, I hardly imagine them living at Tara.



    Good on ya, you do your research.:) Like you, I honestly don't know how this will affect us either. Unfortunately, we can't live twice, try it once under the current system and do it again under the new system, so there is no way to ever really know. I am objective in one sense though : my travel costs are higher than yours no matter what. I can imagine scenarios where they would be higher and where they would be lower. I agree absolutely that the new system helps those who live in Florida and So Cal - unless, they really surprise me and decide to hold the 'regional' events in Hawaii, but I am not holding my breath.

    As for the birth date, I think that has been one of the big things overlooked in the discussion. yes, my daughter is a June baby. June = you are screwed. september = lottery. Bad planning, and really no excuse since they are adopted. Really just didn't think it through, my fault. (Note to all : go to Amazon, the birthday problem in athletic development in the book Outliers is available for free download.) I thought Russels response to Hannity was mind boggingingly weak on this issue vis-a-vis outliers. I think he said it was a "complex calculus". This just left me thinking that for all the time an money he spent obtaining a Ph.d, he doesn't understand what calculus is.
     
    Last edited: Jul 31, 2012
  16. Alohajrtennis

    Alohajrtennis Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2012
    Messages:
    469
    Challenge the system, that's cute. I love it how supporters of a radical change pose as defender of the status quo and try to position the other side as the ones proposing the radical change. clever. fail.

    Here's a quote from Hannity's letter :

    Should the membership vote to keep the schedule and draw sizes, we can begin to work on ways to improve the legitimate concerns the USTA says it has.

    Nobody claims the current schedule/structure is perfect, and that there are not ways it can be improved. But that doesn't mean any change is good. As one of my teachers used to say, there is no one right answer. But that doesn't mean there arent any wrong answers.
     
    Last edited: Jul 31, 2012
  17. Pro_Tour_630

    Pro_Tour_630 Legend

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2004
    Messages:
    5,154
    Location:
    Connecticut
    1. Rod Laver 9th August ,

    2. Sampras 12th August,

    3. Federer 8th August

    so much for outliers and his January babies theories :oops: wish my son was born in august in that case, LOL
     
    Last edited: Jul 31, 2012
  18. chalkflewup

    chalkflewup Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2009
    Messages:
    1,697
    Pro,

    Informative couple of posts. A picture is worth 1000 words.
     
  19. Pro_Tour_630

    Pro_Tour_630 Legend

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2004
    Messages:
    5,154
    Location:
    Connecticut
    here's a quote from hannity's letter

    Do you approve of a 75% reduction in opportunities to play national tournaments outside of your individual sections and or do you prefer to leave the current (2012), although still "reduced," opportunities in place?

    I did a poll, at least vote on it, my hula friend :)
    __________________
     
    Last edited: Jul 31, 2012
  20. Pro_Tour_630

    Pro_Tour_630 Legend

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2004
    Messages:
    5,154
    Location:
    Connecticut
    chalk, I knew you would like it :), I am trying to put tennis racquets on their hands.
     
  21. Alohajrtennis

    Alohajrtennis Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2012
    Messages:
    469
    Because I don't think the two choices you present are anywhere near accurate representations of the choice/opportunities in front of us. Unfortunately, I may need to contact HTT to work on my image uploading skills to present an accurate diagram. You are right in that the 10 and under initiative is increasing the number of kids entering the funnel, which is commendable, but the changes to the competition system will create bottlenecks that will do more harm then good. i.e, better 10 guilty men go free than one innocent man go to jail. When will people realize that tennis, like most sports has changed ? Brandon Wheedon, 28 year old QB ? There will be no more 14 year old's in grand slams. If you want to develop champions, let more kids through not less. Pros will develop later and later, heck one of our Olympians is an ex-russian who never played US Junior tennis and is just starting to mature at 23. Stop trying to predict future champions at 12, 14, 16. Just freakin stop it, its so idiotic. For every one you get right, you will get 10 wrong. And you will never know which 10 you got wrong. It's just egomania, some has been wannabee's trying to take credit for 'identifying' the next star. Well guess what, for every kid you "identified", three others said, screw this ****, I am going to go play soccer.
     
    Last edited: Jul 31, 2012
  22. Alohajrtennis

    Alohajrtennis Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2012
    Messages:
    469
    Read the book, which you obviously have not, then compare/contrast it to the recent changes vis-a-vis the existing system. It's not about our particular children, we are great parents and therefore we will overcome this:), but the data is pretty clear, on a macro-scale, it will skew development resources inappropriately and therefore hurt everyone, including the all important "Future of American Tennis". It is a serious issue. I am just more aware of it becuase of my daughters particulars birth date, but that doesn't make it less of an issue.
     
    Last edited: Jul 31, 2012
  23. ClarkC

    ClarkC Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2008
    Messages:
    3,765
    Location:
    Charlottesville, VA
    I don't think that Rod Laver and Roger Federer were affected much by the timing of the Kalamazoo tourney and the USTA Clay Courts. Nor do I think that Rod Laver was much affected by the junior ITF schedule, because junior tennis was a different sport altogether when he grew up. Rising to the top in Australia was plenty of competition, and traveling overseas to ITFs was not a developmental path.
     
  24. cmb

    cmb Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Apr 27, 2005
    Messages:
    790

    It is the second most popular sport in europe. BUT, their system of tournament tennis is far better then ours.
    If anyone has ever gone to france and actually played in french national tournaments....you would realize how god awful and truly expensive it is to play tennis in the USA.
    Im using france as an example because that is what I know.

    But of course, its useless to argue with americans about how much better structured it is in europe, because they will never understand. and people like you will always pull the 2nd popular sport BS.

    Bottom line is that its much better organized, and they probably have less then half as many courts as we do in the states!

    For example, a club im familiar with has put out 1 guy ranked in the top 400 atp,1 guy ranked 800 atp and 4 D1 college players, all from the junior program with kids from 1989-1991.

    If a club with 3 outdoor courts, and 2 indoor courts (they are indoors 6 months a year) can do something like that in a small city, what are the excuses in the states?
     
  25. tball2day

    tball2day Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2011
    Messages:
    603
    .....................
     
    Last edited: Oct 25, 2012
  26. tennis5

    tennis5 Professional

    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2010
    Messages:
    1,290
    Letter from a TD:

    Coaches support Sean in USTA dispute
    August 04, 2012

    Dear Mr. Hannity,

    On the behalf of junior tennis players and coaches everywhere, I cannot thank you enough for your efforts in trying to ignite debate with your comments and correspondence. Unfortunately, rouge elements of the USTA led by the current President; successfully mounted a campaign of misrepresentation and intimidation to force their agenda on its competitive junior players. These individuals may be well intentioned, but are also dangerously inexperienced and flat out wrong. This coup d'etat was mounted from inside the board rooms and was withheld from the players, coaches and tournament directors until it was completed. I can think of no other organization where individuals with such little expertise could ascend to leadership positions. Their flawed decision making is poised to dissolve and destroy the hopes and dreams of countless young tennis players as well as the USTA junior system. Their assertion that all of this was well vetted is perhaps the grosses lie ever told in American tennis. There were no studies, no focus groups and absolutely no significant national discussion what so ever.

    You are attempting to open a can of worms that they do not want exposed. The leadership involved in this has misrepresented facts, intimidated sections and boards, and used political clout to have key regional personnel fired. National Committee votes were taken at specific times to eliminate dissension. This was done to claim to the sectional boards unanimous support.Their audacity has no bounds as even now they attempt to use names such as Wayne Bryan's and even mine in an open letter to you to support their philosophies. Nothing could be further from the truth!!! Despite efforts... no press has picked up on any of this. Since tennis magazines are controlled by the USTA little non-approved information has gotten out. The "padders" real objective is provide misdirection away from the lack of top American players. But the reality is these changes have the potential to destroy junior tennis in the United States. None of the architects of this plan has significant success in to motivating or training numbers of youth in pursuing tennis as a sport for a lifetime.

    How did all this get started? Where did these proposal's they come from? The polices and ideas were formed years ago. The current USTA President Jon Vegosen
    (out of the mid west) had a preexisting relationship with Dr. Tim Russell. The two had penned a position paper together (which can still be found online). When Vegosen became USTA President he appointed Russel to the head of the National Junior Competition Committee. The charge given to him was to make the junior system more efficient and cheaper. The committee was stocked full of those that would vote for their predetermined course of action. Potential roadblocks were removed from service on the JCC. Many of the committee members appointed were out of the mid west and are beholding to Vegosen. This committee passed the proposals on for sectional vote. During this time period Dr. Russel operated in a cloud of secrecy. The idea was to avoid any possible opposition before a sectional vote. Part of the tactic employed was to make everything seem so complex that the ordinary sectional board member would be bamboozled and rely upon the National Junior Competition Committee recommendations.

    Dr. Russel (minister of propaganda) must go. These proposals are in most cases his. His assertion that there was a landslide is preposterous. The vast majority of sectional competition committees voted heavily against these changes. *These are the true experts! These groups are renowned sectional leaders and experts. Still at the national meeting, sectional boards went against their own committees under heavy pressure. Both in the East and the mid west, the head of junior competition was fired immediately after the sections voted. Why? Both individuals had outstanding reputations and both were simply acknowledging the wishes of their constituents. In the mid west, over 100 emails were sent against these proposals. They poured in from from players, past pro players, top ten college coaches, and known national coaches. Our own board members and president were intimidated into not following the will of those they represent.

    How to fix the situation: The current Junior Competition Committee must be dissolved. All participants must go! Even the well intentioned members lacked the courage and intestinal fortitude to stand up and fight what was occurring. Their fear to speak out allowed this situation to occur. This committee could reverse the present proposals before implementation in 2013. To do so...these positions must be filled with junior development coaches from around the country. All must have coached actively or represent top tournaments, colleges, top international players, past professional players, or top sectional players. Each section of the country must be represented. Meanwhile, the current administration is hard at work to try to continue their hold on this committee. Political payoffs are being attempted. These can be broken up by the nominating committees by vote at the US Open. Most importantly, the new incoming President must be made to see the necessity of appointing a completely new competition committee. He will have complete authority to do this. Our goal is to force this issue NOW!!! This is not an easy task as our friend...Dr. Russel has no intention of relinquishing any control.

    The folly of the whole situation would be comical if not so tragic. None of the proposals will improve tennis, they will destroy it. Who in there right mind would what to shrink and limit opportunities to reach the national level. No one understands the motivating factors better than local coaches and yet they have not been listened to. The reductions amount to a hand picking of players by those in charge. This is not a open or healthy system.
    In observance of brevity I will stop. However, there is much you should be apprised of. We share some mutual friends in Chicago and they can attest to my sincerity and knowledge in theses matters. I can only hope that you will continue to help in preventing the destruction of USA junior tennis. The rabbit hole goes very deep and there is so very much information that I would love to arm you with. Your abilities in communication are exactly what hundreds of coaches are hoping for. We need someone to shine a bright light on what has occurred. These decisions are not being made by the experts... they are being made by "want to be" novices. Please help to send them packing and back to picking fantasy sports teams. They would be far less dangerous to future generations.

    I'll leave you with the following thoughts that most top junior coaches agree on.

    If the intent was to make tournaments more affordable why were the following ideas not pursued instead of reducing events and spots?

    1. More matches per day utilizing 8 game pro sets (doubles) and match tiebreakers to shorten feed-in events and allow for more players.
    2. Airline sponsorship deals to help save players change fees
    3. National hotel and rental car deals to help reduce costs.
    4. Design regions that are geographically drivable.
    5. Select National Opens upon geography and flight affordability

    If the intent is to Improve players why?

    1. Reduce number of National Championships
    2. Shrink the number of youngest athletes competing.
    3. Eliminate earned National acceptance through national ranking.
    4 .Use limited funds to pay for players to switch citizenship's.
    5. Funding players that are not evaluated by impartial means or board.
    6. Have no professional mentoring program for juniors and professionals given money.
    7. No coaching at provided to US juniors at all grand slam events.

    The USTA has no business manipulating selections and hand picking large numbers of players for events. This is bad process and selecting to validate their jobs. Tournament scheduling and events should not be vested within junior development wing. (outside committee should do this) Money should go to promoting and supporting players making the jump from juniors to professional. This was the failure of our past. Unfortunately, we have not learned the proper lessons from our mistakes. Today's top players were juniors just 8 years ago. There was nothing wrong with our system, as our players out performed Tsonga, Murray, Monfeis and the rest. Our failure was the lack of time money and structure that was absent to further their futures.The junior system should be left alone. My fellow professionals continue to turn out talent. Let's not limit events or opportunities. To fix professional tennis requires a vision and plan that begins after juniors.

    Respectfully Yours,

    Tom Walker
    Director of Tennis
    Kalamazoo YMCA's
     
    Last edited: Aug 10, 2012
  27. t135

    t135 Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Sep 1, 2009
    Messages:
    780
    Tennis is a great sport.
     
    Last edited: Aug 26, 2012
  28. tennis5

    tennis5 Professional

    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2010
    Messages:
    1,290
    He is a really well known and respected tournament director.......

    Has your kid played one of his tournaments? Have you met him and spoken to him?

    If not, I wouldn't make disparaging remarks as an anonymous poster
    about a man whose business is also dependent upon the USTA and is yet willing to go on the line and speak up.

    But, please do post a letter here from a coach or tournament director that supports the 2014 changes. I look forward to reading it.
     
    Last edited: Aug 10, 2012
  29. chalkflewup

    chalkflewup Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2009
    Messages:
    1,697
    Ironic that Europeans grow up and play there and then come here to play college!
     
  30. Alohajrtennis

    Alohajrtennis Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2012
    Messages:
    469
    Not ironic, just smart. European colleges don't offer tennis scholarships.
     
  31. chalkflewup

    chalkflewup Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2009
    Messages:
    1,697
    Ya know, it's funny that just because I'm in the minority in my thinking here, people often disagree with me sometimes just because. With that said, I stand by my words - it's still ironic. ;)

    Shalom - the nicest word you will know.
     
  32. Alohajrtennis

    Alohajrtennis Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2012
    Messages:
    469
    Wow, I didn't know about your tennis background, I had just assumed you were a legendary blues guitarist...
     
  33. sundaypunch

    sundaypunch Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    May 17, 2011
    Messages:
    1,645
    This is a forum to talk about junior tennis. If you can't handle reading someone else's opinion without resorting to name calling, it's time to step away from the computer.
     
  34. tennis5

    tennis5 Professional

    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2010
    Messages:
    1,290
    Let's see, I post Tom's letter on this website, so we can have all the back and forth letters on one actual thread,
    and you immediately make derogatory remarks about him in the next post......
    Tom Walker, btw, who makes part of his living hosting tournaments and yet is willing to stand up on principle and say what is rights and what is wrong with the USTA in a well written articulate, a little long, letter.

    The only actual argument you have made
    (bc most of the time you are taking cheat shots at Hannity, such as:
    "Hannity is an arrogant liar who will say anything, true or not, to put another buck in his pocket"
    and that over the top remark that I won't repeat)
    is when you stated about the 2014 changes:
    "And it will add depth at the local and regional/sectional level instead of having players running all over the country.
    Creative sections can set up more sectional team events etc. Players can travel to international events."


    Well, no.................. it won't add any depth to the section.
    Funny thing is the very elite players in the small sections don't live in their states....
    Thus, the need for so many wildcards as entrance to nationals will be based on sectional rankings.
    So, all you have done is kept the same players in a small section and the elite players still live elsewhere and still don't play in their small sections.

    And your other idea is that if players can't get into national tournaments as well, we will only have two in 2014 and they will be reduced -
    is that you suggest that the player travel to international events......
    Wow. Yes, that is much cheaper than flying in one's own country.


    Now, you have listed your resume above.
    Which is really helpful because I was wondering why you are on this junior site telling us why the 2014 national tournament schedule
    is good for JUNIOR players as I was confused by one of your earlier posts in this thread where you stated:
    "I have no kids who aspire to be national player, not in tennis anyway."


    So, GREAT.............. state your name as a coach and tell us who you brought up that is a nationally ranked player and WAS at the "top"
    ironically under the old system which doesn't work.
    It shouldn't be a secret if you are a "well respected" coach.
    And then post your own letter under your OWN NAME AS A WELL RESPECTED COACH and put it on Hannity's website
    explaining in actual words and reasoning and factual evidence WHY the 2014 changes are good for tennis players in this country
    instead of just saying that tennis parents are "whiners" ....
    Because most folks actually need hard core information, facts, examples, numbers in order for a real debate to occur.


    But, I guess not.......
    You are a coward who would rather remain hidden on a tennis board and take cheap shots at a pretty great guy who has the balls to list his name.
     
    Last edited: Aug 10, 2012
  35. t135

    t135 Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Sep 1, 2009
    Messages:
    780
    I like the new USTA direction.
     
    Last edited: Aug 26, 2012
  36. tennis5

    tennis5 Professional

    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2010
    Messages:
    1,290

    Yes.... I did read your previous posts on this thread........
    Where do you think I am getting the quotes from?

    I ask you for facts, and you state now -
    "Blah, blah, blah, I don't owe you anything and I don't care if you disagree with my comments"

    And then you ask me, "How does one debate with a whiner?"

    And why would I "call you a name back"?
    Isn't this site suppose to be about sharing information, and helping juniors and parents with tennis knowledge.
    How could name calling further or promote the goals of what a board should be about - knowledge.

    I have sent a letter to the USTA with my name and cc it to everyone in my inbox who cares about junior tennis in this country.
    When did I do that?
    When the vote was about to be counted in March and I was asking folks to call their sections.
    There is no anonymous email letters to the USTA or to folks across the country.
    I did call my section......
    ( they were voting against it, until their funding was threatened to be cut, and then elite junior tennis was considered a small section of the pie, which interestingly another poster said here in a different thread, but in a more contentious voice. Turns out he was right.)
    I did get over 100 letters the last week from folks who cared enough to write, and not one letter was for it.
    And yes......... I was called a whiner here in February on this board when I was trying to get folks to realize what was going to happen, and they needed to call their sectional office.

    When I ask you about providing actual numbers, percentages, facts, information to support your side? To have a real debate.....
    You state, " The "facts, examples, and numbers" are that I like the new USTA direction. "
    Really? You can't give ANY numerical evidence to support your decision?

    I repeat back the little actual information that YOU provided in a direct quote about how it would be great as player in 2014 -
    because ALL THE KIDS WOULD PLAY IN THEIR SECTION ( uh, not true at all, these kids don't even live in their section, hence the wc.....).
    Your other winner was that kids should travel to another country.....
    I don't know if you travel much........... but international travel is a bit more expensive than traveling in your own country.
    And most parents are pretty tapped out in this economy.

    Yes, my son does play the national tournaments, and he will be at the end of high school when the 2014 changes come in.
    I haven't met one parent at one national tournament that thinks the elimination of play is a "good thing".
    This week, one parent motioned to all the college coaches and said, "How do these coaches get to see players who live on another coast?"
    It is a good question...... The big national tournaments are an opportunity for coaches to see the players.

    In 2012, for the 16's, there are 4 national tournaments, and they are spread out geographically.
    Arizona, California, Florida, and Michigan.
    It is a big country, and while you think players can fly to another country........ some coaches are on a limited budget.
    99% of the parents want their junior to play college tennis, they're not dreaming of the pros.
    But, the ELIMINATION of TWO of the national tournaments and the REDUCTION of the other two national tournaments is going to hinder a lot of coaches from seeing a lot of players.

    Anyway, you state in this thread that "I have no kids who aspire to be national player, not in tennis anyway."
    I was glad to hear that you are a "respected coach" that has trained state, sectional and national players....
    So, again, why not state your case?
    Sean Hannity is providing an open, public, platform for any well known coach on his website.
    He seems like a fair guy that would put up your letter as long as you can hold off on certain words.....

    You state Tom Walker is just a "guy with an opinion",
    but he is putting it on the line in a very public forum with a lot to lose as he is affiliated with the USTA.
    He's got balls.
    And so, it seems very cowardly to me to be disrespectful to him, "The head of YMCA tennis in Michigan has spoken",
    when you are just a "guy with an opinion on an anonymous board" with no actual data, facts, examples, numbers to provide a basis for your argument.

    I don't think name calling is appropriate on a forum,
    so in the future just put me on your ignore list and that way you don't have to respond to any posts where I print someone's public letter.

    Good luck with your kids, and that is meant with the best wishes.
     
    Last edited: Aug 11, 2012
  37. tennis5

    tennis5 Professional

    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2010
    Messages:
    1,290
    Trying to get all letters in one thread:

    http://www.hannity.com/article/antonio-mora-responds-to-hannity-russell-usta-debate/15857

    The following is an attempt to focus on the main issues discussed in the exchange between Sean Hannity and Tim Russell. It is less than two pages long and an addresses what I see as the most substantive issues raised by the USTA’s changes in the junior competitive schedule. While I believe those changes are well-intentioned, I am afraid there are a series of unintended consequences that will do precisely the opposite of what the USTA hopes to achieve.

    1) “Meaningful Competition,” Best Playing the Best,” “Earned Advancement.” These phrases are used repeatedly in Tim Russell’s response to Sean Hannity and are the main philosophical reasons for the changes. Ironically, the quota system at the heart of the USTA’s changes directly contradicts that philosophy. If you want the best to play the best, then why is the USTA allowing for a “size component” when it comes to determining a section’s quota? Size should be irrelevant, if you want to be intellectually consistent and fair. Only a section’s strength should be considered if we are being honest about only rewarding kids who have earned it with the ability to play nationally. If, as Dr. Russell repeatedly says, we want all national matches to be competitive, for the best to play the best, quality should trump size. The size of a section should be irrelevant (see point #2).

    2) Section Strength. Making matters worse, the USTA is using its own rankings to determine the strength of a section. Instead, it should use a head-to-head ranking system such as Tennis Information that more fairly determines the ability of a player (a player is not penalized if injuries didn’t allow him or her to enter major tournaments and it does not reward players who have the financial wherewithal to play every national and regional tournament). Let’s use Florida as an example. The quota Florida will get for supernationals, based on the size/strength equation, is only 10 (it would have more if “size” were not considered). When I looked on July 10th, there were 13 Florida boys in the top 150 on the USTA 14s rankings and 13 in the 12s. But, if you look at the Tennisinformation rankings, there are 24 in the top 150 in the 14s (plus Stefan Kozlov, so it’s really 25) and there are 26 in the 12s, fully double the strength Florida is getting credit for in its quota by using the USTA rankings as the gauge. How can it possibly be fair to limit Florida kids to ten spots at supernationals? The injustice is such that the #61, 62, 63, 67 and 73 boys in the country on Tennis Information in the 14s (on July 10th) would not be ranked highly enough in Florida to get in under the quota. One of those boys who would miss out is part of USTA Player Development.

    3) Wild Cards. Doesn’t increasing the number of wild cards also directly contradict the earned advancement that’s being preached?

    4) Chasing Points. A lot of time has been wasted focusing on kids who chase points by traveling long distances as if this were an epidemic that somehow invalidates the ranking structure. That overlooks the reality that only a small number of kids do so and that none of those kids gets ranked very highly unless they win a lot of matches. The new 2012 point structure makes it even harder for “chasing points” to have any kind of significant effect because kids don’t earn many points unless they get deep into a tournament. Can anyone show me a kid in the top 50 in the country who hasn’t earned his or her way to that ranking?

    5) “Increase” in Opportunities. I’m mystified by Mr. Russell’s argument here. There is no doubt that there are more opportunities for the super-elite players (top 20 in the country), but some of the added Level 1 tournaments only take between four and 16 applicants per category. The “majors,” the supernationals, will only take place twice a year instead of four. Level 2 tournaments are cut from four concurrent tournaments four times a year to only three concurrent tournaments only twice a year. Level 3 regional tournaments are slashed from eight tournaments four times a year to four tournaments three times a year. Again, I’m mystified at how that’s an “increase.”

    6) Aging Up Decrease in Opportunities. An important point that is not addressed is that the new system will greatly delay the ability for even super-elite kids to play nationally in the years they age up, especially in the country’s most competitive regions. That can’t be good for their tennis.
     
  38. tennis5

    tennis5 Professional

    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2010
    Messages:
    1,290
    Continued....

    7) Travel “Reduction.” By my count, a 14 year-old kid who plays a full national and sectional schedule currently plays 17 level 1-to-4 tournaments (four supernats, four national opens, four regionals, zonals and four sectionals). Under the new system (as I interpret the convoluted 2014 schedule), a kid who plays a full schedule (the super-elite) will play a similar number of level 1-to-4 tournaments, but they will have to play a far greater number of tournaments in their section in order to make sure to make their section’s quota. Home school anyone? The kids who are just below the super-elite will also play about the same number of level 1-to-4 tournaments they play today XXXXXXX (but they will be playing mostly level 3 and 4s)XXXXXXXX. For the super-elite and the next layer of top kids, the proposal does NOTHING to decrease travel. But the big issue is the flip side: even top kids who don’t make it into their section’s quota will have a travel elimination, with almost no opportunity to play outside their section, nationally OR regionally (see examples in #2 above).

    8) Travel Costs and Distances. The truth is that the new system will not help much. It is sometimes far more time consuming and expensive to travel within a section than to go to a national open or regional elsewhere. Try to get from the Tri-Cities in Washington State to Oklahoma City (kids in region 2 will have to do that) or even from Miami to Augusta, Georgia… it’s cheaper and much quicker to fly to Dallas, Chicago or New York!

    9) Missing School. I find it ironic that after years where the USTA seemed not to care about this (January regionals not scheduled over MLK Birthday weekend, February National Opens not scheduled over President’s Day weekend, the Easter Bowl scheduled when virtually nobody has spring break, May National Opens not scheduled over Memorial Day weekend; I can go on with more examples), the Russell letter argues that the new system will be better on that score. It is, slightly. But it would have been awfully easy to make the old schedule work better.

    10) Playing Styles and Surfaces. The Russell letter mostly skirts the issue of how the new changes will limit exposure to different surfaces and playing styles. As he says, the new system will provide opportunities for the super-elite to have that kind of exposure, but the reality is the enormous majority of our top kids will be hurt. When will top Florida kids compete indoors? When will most top kids in the country compete on clay?

    11) Birth Year. Why in the world would Dr. Russell even raise the possibility of returning to the much-discredited (by “Outliers” and other subsequent research) calendar-year system? Is he actually arguing that, somehow, two wrongs (calendar-year system and only two supernationals) would suddenly make a right? I’ve heard the ITF is considering following the much fairer rolling-birthday system we have here. The USTA should exert its efforts to change the ITF, not to go back to a silly, discriminatory system.

    12) “Lower Ranked Players.” Dr. Russell jumps all over Mr. Hannity for saying that “lower-ranked players will not get to play national events,” asking why “low-ranked players should play national events.” I can’t speak for Mr. Hannity, but he said “lower” not “low.” That’s an important distinction. Very, very good kids will not be able to play national events under a whole series of circumstances. While there is a certain inertia that keeps top players near the top from the 10s on, some kids do make progress over time and manage to soar to the top. Some kids do come out of seemingly nowhere to do very well in tournaments. The next Andre Agassi could be a kid who didn’t do well in the 12s and 14s but then grows a foot in the 18s. By discouraging that player by limiting his opportunities early on, we may lose him to lacrosse or baseball.

    13) Psychology. Here again, I agree with Mr. Hannity and disagree with Dr. Russell, especially when he calls Mr. Hannity’s point “preposterous.” Kids getting the chance to play nationally, even if it’s only every once in a while, is powerful validation. Few things are more inspiring to young players than playing at the highest levels with the country’s best players. Limiting those opportunities will give far fewer players the chance to get that inspiration. Traveling around the country often leads to the kinds of friendships that are catalysts that encourage a lifetime of tennis. Again, fewer kids will have that chance. They and the sport will suffer for it.

    14) Kids Playing Adults. I’m not sure what it’s like where Dr. Russell lives in, but I’m with Mr. Hannity in saying that that kids playing with adults just doesn’t happen. Maybe if a new rating system gets implemented that mixes everybody into the same tournaments, but spontaneous play with adults who aren’t their parents is uncommon in today’s world. Please don’t take away opportunities for kids to play with a wide variety of good kids, no matter what form of transportation they need to get to that competition.

    15) “Consultation.” Even though I wanted to keep this email focused on substance, this is one non-substantive point that needs to be addressed. Dr. Russell talks about the legions of people who were consulted, but the process was anything but transparent, open and public as he claims. When the proposed changes were unveiled at the post-Christmas meeting in Texas, people there were told NOT to disseminate the proposals. When I sent a detailed analysis of the proposals to dozens of parents of highly-competitive kids across the country two months later in early March, NONE of them were aware any of this was being considered. Tom Walker recently addressed the lack of consultation this in a letter published on Zoo Tennis. I hope the USTA accepts Mr. Hannity’s offer to poll parents. It wouldn’t have to be unwieldy: if you poll parents of the top two hundred kids in each age group, you’re talking about less than 1600 people (some will be duplicates with multiple kids). I think the USTA will be surprised at the extent of the opposition to the changes.

    Finally, there are many positives in the changes approved, but there are an awful lot of negatives. I would hope the USTA could find an intelligent middle ground that would not slash the opportunities for kids to play nationally while still taking steps to help create new great tennis generations.

    In the interest of full disclosure, assuming all things remain equal, my son is not likely to suffer much from the changes and is highly ranked enough that some may benefit him. Dr. Russell gave his background, so I will too. I am a Harvard Law School graduate, with a lot of training and experience analyzing complex documents (both the approved changes and Dr. Russell’s letter certainly qualify as such). After practicing law in New York, I switched careers and became a broadcast journalist, earning a dozen national and local Emmy Awards. I am also a lifelong tennis player from a tennis-playing family that includes a brother who played on the ATP tour for years and two generations of Davis Cup players.

    I would urge everyone to be forthcoming with their names in whatever discussion ensues. It’s disappointing to see so many anonymous attacks from all sides in this important conversation and I would hope the USTA would not be vindictive against the children of those who express opinions the organization does not like. Sadly, many people are afraid to speak out because they believe that will happen.

    Thanks for reading.

    Antonio Mora
    News Anchor
     
  39. t135

    t135 Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Sep 1, 2009
    Messages:
    780
    TAUT is an excellent program to pull new players into tennis.
     
    Last edited: Aug 26, 2012
  40. t135

    t135 Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Sep 1, 2009
    Messages:
    780
    Thanks for the feedback.
     
    Last edited: Aug 26, 2012
  41. coaching32yrs

    coaching32yrs Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2010
    Messages:
    449
    The USTA proposed changes, good or bad, are not going to stop anyone from achieving a pro career or top college career. The game is the game. Play because you love the game and the competition. I don't personally care about the USTA tournament structure. Too many parents and their kids are obsessed with playing the "prestige" events and being seen by coaches at name schools.
     
  42. tennis5

    tennis5 Professional

    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2010
    Messages:
    1,290
    Interview with Zoo tennis -

    Interesting interview, although I do think he shot himself in the foot here with the political comment....


    Q: What is your feeling about the junior competition changes?

    I’ve spoken out about them. I actually support the idea of finding the great American stars. I have a 10-year-old girl and a 13-year-old boy, and it seems to me that while they’re finding them, the USTA should do everything to nurture that and support it and help it along the way. But 99.9 percent of the kids are not going to be pros. But there’s fifteen, twenty thousand kids in any given year, five thousand new ones every year, that play college tennis. That’s a lot of college opportunities.

    For example, reducing this tournament draw I think is a big mistake.(It goes to 128 from 192 in 2013).

    What are the parents, the ones I speak to when I’m out with my kids at these tournaments looking for? We want to keep our kids out of trouble, it’s a pretty tough world. They learn a lot of life lessons—they learn about winning and losing; that the harder you work the better you’re going to do; they learn that sometimes life isn’t fair. Those are really good life lessons.

    There are a lot of college scholarships, and I’d like to see them go to American kids, more and more of which are not.

    I just don’t understand it. Nobody gets hurt if you keep it the way it is, nobody. Not one kid gets hurt. But a lot of kids get hurt when they change it. It’s a 75 percent reduction if you look at it between 2010 and 2014 and I haven’t gotten an explanation except some people can’t afford to travel. And as I suggested in one of my letters, that is a real concern.

    So let’s get JetBlue as the official sponsor of United States Tennis Association Junior Tennis, Marriott as the official hotel, Hertz as the official rental car and why don’t we add five dollars, ten dollars a tournament so everyone gets to help out and support all of our kids?

    Because it’s not about one kid. It’s about a sport we all love combined.

    And I think they’re making a big mistake. I also think they are going against their very own mission statement to increase participation and the love of this sport. By excluding kids and taking away their opportunities, we’re making a big mistake.

    When you look back at when they pulled the 12s Nationals, it took them ten years to correct that mistake.

    There was a girl who spoke up at the Girls 14s in Georgia, there were a lot of the USTA officials and I think Patrick McEnroe was there, and she is heading into her pre-college years now and she said, wait a minute, I’ve worked hard and my parents have sacrificed a lot so I can play tennis at a high level and you’re taking these opportunities just before I’m getting ready to go to college.

    I think it’s really unfortunate, and my hope is that they’ll open their minds. I have offered to help fund an objective poll of the people this will impact--Gallup,

    Pew, any legitimate polling organization. Let’s poll the people who are going to be impacted by this. I predict a minimum of 80/20 against the changes. And so far I have not gotten an answer that they would support that.

    One thing that I’m surprised at is that everybody’s a little intimidated by the USTA. They feel the wild cards are going to be taken away, their chance to go to one of the training centers is going to be taken away. Tournament directors fear their tournaments are going to be taken away.

    Here’s the question they’ve got to decide. Are they here to serve the desires of their membership or are they here to dictate what their members are going to get whether they like it or not?

    For me it’s pretty clear cut. The USTA is supposed to serve its members. The argument that Dr. (Timothy) Russell, (chair of the USTA’s Junior Competition committee) made to me was too bad, basically. Too bad for a 12-year-old who can’t get into a tournament? If you go through the waiting lists at tournaments, a lot of kids want to participate. They’re going to be away from home, they like to be in hotels, be around their friends. They’re developing healthy lifestyles, they’re learning all the good lessons tennis teaches them, so (the changes) make no sense to me whatsoever.

    This is not something I actually wanted to get into, I just want you to know. I’ve got a pretty busy job trying to defeat Obama. But I’m hopeful; the response from college coaches and tournament directors and players, top players, has been overwhelmingly supportive. As a matter of fact, not one person has come up to me and said they disagree with me. So that’s a good sign. But I think it’s going to take a lot of people speaking out and saying, wait a minute, this is not what’s good, what’s in the best interest of our kids.

    Nobody gets hurt if you don’t change it. A lot of kids get hurt, a lot of opportunities are gone (if it is changed). I’m only in Kalamazoo for a short time, but look at what this tournament means to these kids. And all these college coaches, I just talked to the Columbia coach and I know Dwayne Hultquist of Florida State is here, and all these really good coaches are here to see these kids. Maybe they see someone who is not quite the highest ranked, maybe had an injury a year ago, who performs well. You always have one or two kids, unseeded, who come out of nowhere and do pretty well.

    I’m hopeful they’ll be responsive to their membership, because if they’re responsive to their membership, they won’t follow through with these changes.
     
  43. tennis5

    tennis5 Professional

    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2010
    Messages:
    1,290
    Controversial letter to Hannity's interview with Zoo tennis

    What's the objective ?
    Is there only one ?
    Is it soley to produce the next us champion ?
    Or produce enough highy quality players capable of filling our available college spots ?
    Or to provide a great experience for a broad range of juniors so that they will have a life long appreciation of tennis ?

    If it's just to produce the net American champion, why don't they take the top 50 kids at 13-14 and screw all the others completely, becuase brewer and macenroe have gone on record is saying that by 13 or 14 you need to be top 50, so why I they even bothering with 128 ? Becuase when the first draft came out, they tied to cut the clays to 64 and everybody screamed bloody murder, that's why.

    Look this simple player development has taken over junior tennis for the sole purpose of creating new us champions.
    They are deathly afraid of what happens to the us open revenue stream
    when Serena and roddick retire and federer retires and ratings plummet bemuse we have Serbians fighting ukranians for titles.

    There position and attitude is very clear : national completion is for them to identify and grow pros,
    you are just hoping to get a couple rounds into the tournament and get a college scholarship, you are not welcome.
     
  44. MarTennis

    MarTennis Rookie

    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2011
    Messages:
    269
    Make some points here...

     
  45. TennisEko

    TennisEko Banned

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2012
    Messages:
    40
    Don't worry we've got Americans coming through...2-3 years and we will b back on top...
     
  46. Alohajrtennis

    Alohajrtennis Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2012
    Messages:
    469
    I agree, lots of great players coming up, no shortage, if we can support them in the next stage. IMO, as I have stated in another thread, while our Junior system is far from perfect, the biggest problem comes at the next level. The games has changed, no more 17 year olds in grand slams, etc. we expect to much too soon from our players, we expect or Kalamazoo winners to be contending at the Open the next year. Too many people who think they know who can be pros and who cant at age 13 or 14. Fact is, our best kids still need three or four more years on a developmental tour, but probably costs a player 100K per year to compete on the futures circuit. Fix the futures circuit, and support budding pros, that part of the system is more broken then the junior system
     
  47. 10ismom

    10ismom Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2011
    Messages:
    450
    Bravo!!! Totally agree.
    I was heart-broken reading an article on prize money earned by the winner was lower than a chair umpire in the Futures circuit. It was posted on this forum before. How can the next star survive the system without solid financial support?
     
    Last edited: Aug 27, 2012
  48. Pro_Tour_630

    Pro_Tour_630 Legend

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2004
    Messages:
    5,154
    Location:
    Connecticut
    http://sports.yahoo.com/news/atp-players-ponder-australian-open-boycott-report-020653874--ten.html
     
  49. TCF

    TCF Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2012
    Messages:
    1,908
    ====================================================
     
    Last edited: Oct 25, 2012
  50. ga tennis

    ga tennis Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2010
    Messages:
    1,710
    No one knows. Just look at Milos im sure no one thought he would be where hes at now 5 years ago.I dont know about top ranked atp but i think we will have alot of players in the top 100 men and women.
     

Share This Page