Senior players - fitness and playing

Discussion in 'Health & Fitness' started by jimanuel12, Jun 8, 2012.

  1. jimanuel12

    jimanuel12 Semi-Pro

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    i was just wondering - i am 63+ years old - been playing tennis since i was in HS. Played all through college and off and on again for years.
    I started playing again allot about 7 or 8 years ago - never had any real injuries but until about 3 years ago - hurt the arm really bad and got a bad - i mean bad - case of TE.
    Other than that - never really had any injuries or anything.
    I have managed to keep my weight in check - 6'3" 178 lbs - quit smoking - try to eat right and so far been pretty good with the health other than the TE mentioned.
    How do you other "seniors" (i hate that word) been doing?
    The reason i asked it most of the people my age can't play anymore due to injuries, sickness or whatever. I have to play guys 15 years younger than me - sometimes i win and sometimes i don't but i still love the game. I hope to play as long as i can.:)
     
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  2. r2473

    r2473 Legend

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    I play a guy that is probably about your age. He is a master pusher and probably about the most fit guy I know. He can literally play all day, multiple days in a row. When he isn't playing, he walks / jogs 4-6 miles most days. No joke.

    Up until just a year or two ago, he could beat all comers in the 4.0 and below range and gave 4.5 guys lots of problems (frustrated the **** out of everyone). But he suffered a bad fall on court and hurt his wrist. He also developed a bit of a knee problem. Hasn't really been able to quite fully heal it seems. He's healed pretty well. Just not quite 100%. This has taken his game down 1/2 notch. He's still pretty good though and doesn't lose too often.

    I have a blast playing him. Our rallies are usually in the 10-20 stroke range. Lots of running on both sides.
     
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  3. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    63 + 4 months.
    Before my ankle sprain in '08, I could run about as fast as the FASTEST 5.0 players around, but I'd rely on that and just hit thoughtless shots over and over again, working on my shots, not caring about the outcome of points. So I was basically an erratic 4.0.
    Now, not having run for 4 years, developing a swollen medial collateral that same left leg, probably a litle out of shape :)):)), I need to hit good shots with good technique, force the opponent into his noncomfort zone, and basically just go for it on the first two balls, and I'm still an erratic 4.0.
    It seems I can just lose to the highest of the 3.5's, those guys who don't fear me (my good friend who've I've beaten about 60-3 in sets), pummel most 3.5's and new 4.0's, but get pummelled by 5's and 5.0's.
    In doubles, I usually hold my own in 4.5 levels, but in singles, no chance whatsoever.
    However, I'm waiting for one of my ankle sprains to heal, hope the medial collateral will get better, play tennis once a week, can concentrate on windsurfing.
     
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  4. jimanuel12

    jimanuel12 Semi-Pro

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    it really sucks being injured. the TE has kept me off my game for a long time now and i love to play so bad - i want this thing to heal so i can get back on the courts.
    tennis is the only game i have ever played that i truly love. i miss playing but have to heal first.
    hope you get back to 100% and start playing again very soon.:)
     
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  5. arthurchen

    arthurchen New User

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    I am 50 and play five times a week, staying injury free is tough, my advise is to keep your weight down, have good technique, use flexible racquet, lower tension strings, or gut on the mains for your TE, and cross train. I hit the gym 2-3 times a week and do a lot of leg and core work. I also jog with my Labrador a couple times a week. I do some sprint work on the court to keep my quickness up and recovery time good. I need to stretch more, not that flexible, but the cross training and other things keeps me relatively injury free.
     
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  6. mary fierce

    mary fierce Banned

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    Doubles, my friend. Too much running in one's 60s in most cases will lead to problems.
     
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  7. jimanuel12

    jimanuel12 Semi-Pro

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    that is very true - my mind says "i can get to that ball - and my body says no you can't".
    i hate getting old - i am not going to age "gracefully" - whatever that means.

    i am still going to play as long as God and my body say i can.:)
     
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  8. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    Nothing wrong with letting the shots that land within a foot of the sidelines go for winners. Nobody can get them all, and you just cover the court you can cover.
    If the opponent's start to drop and lob you, you just have to hit harder shots that force them on the defense.
     
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  9. Robbnc

    Robbnc Rookie

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    I just turned 57 last week. I run about 30 miles a week and lift 2 times. Over the last 4 years I have had great success with prolotherapy and prp for injuries. But training away from tennis is the most important thing by far.

    While I do play mostlly doubles, last night I beat a very good 6'1" , 17 years old high school #1 in singles. It actually turned into an running endurance match and I won it. I slept in this morning and think I will take today off.
     
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  10. jimanuel12

    jimanuel12 Semi-Pro

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    if i played that long and beat a 17 year old - i would have to take the rest of the week off:)

    good for you dude!!!
     
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  11. basil J

    basil J Hall of Fame

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    Glad to see some else has embraced prolotherapy on these boards. Stuff works. Mainstream don't recognize it as a viable solution. It helped my shoulder quite a bit when I had a bicep tendon issue 3 years ago.
     
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  12. r2473

    r2473 Legend

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    We do the exact same training......but I'm only 39. Wonder how I'll be doing in 20 years?
     
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  13. TomT

    TomT Hall of Fame

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    I'm 64 +. Played for about two years in the mid 70's. Then didn't play for about 40 years.

    I started playing again about 2 years ago, then had a Crohn's Disease flairup. Lost about 70 lbs. and got very weak. On retiring to Florida and taking up tennis again I was so weak in the beginning that I could only hit against the practice wall for about 10 to 15 minutes. Eventually, I recovered to the point where I'm now able to play intense 3 set matches lasting up to 3 hours.

    Never had tennis elbow, but recently, due to too much playing I think, the tendons in the back of my hand have become a bit sore. A bit of rest should heal that, I think.

    I'm 5'11", about 200 lbs. Smoke once in a while. Eat good. I feel pretty good for my age, but nowhere near what I felt like 40 years ago when I could run down pretty much any shot that a good club player could hit.

    Good. All of my matches are against players that are 15 years younger than me, or more. I don't win most of them, but I'm comptetitive, and have met some fine people. Tennis is my main hobby in retirement, and I credit my active involvement in it with increasing my quality of life at ~ 65.

    Well, best wishes to you, and thanks for your post. I'm extremely thankful that I'm able to get out on the tennis court and be competitive at my age. It's a great game, full of nuances and subleties that will keep me interested in it even when I'm not able to play it.
     
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  14. Pacific lefty

    Pacific lefty Rookie

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    My best tennis partner and opponent is 70 this year and is a fantastic player. Hoping he's going to help me come back after my shoulder SAD 8 weeks ago. We started hitting ten years ago, he was in such good shape that I would feel physically ill after playing a match with him. His secret I think is down to good technique, jogging and lots of walking on the beach, and he tells me that when he serves the ball, he has already decided what he is going to do for the next 3 shots. He reads returns and other players really well.

    Even though I live in a place where tennis is a real minority sport, anybody I have met over 60 who plays it is fit, participates in other active pursuits,and enjoys everything all the more because of it!
     
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  15. TomT

    TomT Hall of Fame

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    One of best players I've played is also 70. He and his wife come to Fort Lauderdale for a couple of months during the winter. He's trim, toned and very fit. He doesn't have big shots or anything, but he wins because he's a really good volleyer and attacking player who's able to direct points so that he's almost always in a position where he doesn't have to hit great shots.

    What's the average rehabilitation time after something like that?
     
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  16. jimanuel12

    jimanuel12 Semi-Pro

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    it is good to hear that allot of us are still able to play. my TE is getting better by the day - hope i can be playing again before too long.
    best wishes to all of you and hope we can play until we are at least 100!!
     
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  17. TomT

    TomT Hall of Fame

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    I think that for both (all) of us the prescription is patience. Don't rush it. I've still got 5 weeks left in my current summer league season, and my problem feels much better, almost normal (ie. no pain when I swing the racquet), but I'm going to give it at least another week without stressing it.

    Thanks. Me too.
     
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  18. TomT

    TomT Hall of Fame

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    By the way, after doing a bit of Google research I think that I might have some form of tennis elbow that I'm (mostly) feeling in the tendons in the back of my hand. Actually, my whole forearm has been a bit sore ... just more localized in the hand. I don't know the mechanics of it all, but resting it and doing mild stretching exercises has seemed to help.
     
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  19. jimanuel12

    jimanuel12 Semi-Pro

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    having had TE for a long time now, the best advice is rest, ice and more rest. if the pain get too severe, then you may need to see a doctor or physical therapist.
    i have been going for physical therapy for over a month now and the pain is finally beginning to go away but i hurt the arm over 3 years ago and it never did really heal correctly.
    my point is - don't let it go and rest the arm before you play anymore - if you don't then you will pay the price. that is what happened to me, i kept on playing after i hurt the arm and it will take some time before it heals.
    good luck.
     
    #19
  20. sureshs

    sureshs Bionic Poster

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    A practical strategy would be to give up singles and only play doubles.
     
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