Serve: why turn your wrist in slightly from the start

Discussion in 'Tennis Tips/Instruction' started by directionals, Jan 19, 2013.

  1. directionals

    directionals Rookie

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    What is the significance of turning your wrist in slightly at the beginning of the serve. See Federer right wrist in the pic below:

    (ok, figured out how to add a picture)
    [​IMG]

    I read the quote from CoachingMastery on tennisone.com. CoachingMastery, if you see this, can you explain? Thanks.
     
    Last edited: Jan 19, 2013
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  2. sureshs

    sureshs Bionic Poster

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    Some keep it neutral, some start with slightly closed, some slightly open. Various theories exist about how the closed or open faces facilitate more spin by forcing a certain path of the swing. In general, the open faced starting posture seems to produce more spin and much less pace.
     
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  3. directionals

    directionals Rookie

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    See Federer's right wrist. This is listed as one of the fundamentals. Fed has it. Henin has it.
     
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  4. TomT

    TomT Hall of Fame

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    If you use a more or less continental (relaxed) grip and put your arm more or less straight down at your side, then that's more or less what it looks like.
     
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  5. moopie

    moopie Rookie

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    Federer's wrist turn is pretty mild. Take a look at Raonic, the hitting side of his racket face is turned towards the sky.
     
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  6. boramiNYC

    boramiNYC Hall of Fame

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    it's kinda like a priming tension inside of the forearm readying for a much stronger tension needed during pronation and contact. A good server usually does it without thinking from subconscious coordination.
     
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  7. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    It could be priming tension, but I think it allows a relaxed wrist to go thru it's full range of motion to whip into the ball.
    Kinda like the Roddick motion, which is more wrist applied than something like the DJ/Hewitt motion.
     
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