Short article on Roy Emerson

Discussion in 'Former Pro Player Talk' started by krosero, Jan 13, 2010.

  1. krosero

    krosero Legend

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    Part of an article published today at OregonLive.com ("Let Us Now Praise Roy Emerson"):

    Full article: http://blog.oregonlive.com/tennis/2010/01/let_us_now_praise_roy_emerson.html
     
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  2. MAX PLY

    MAX PLY Hall of Fame

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    Nice article. Thanks for providing the link.
     
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  3. jswinf

    jswinf Professional

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    Thanks for the post, it's good to remember Emmo. I read the full article and I think the writer makes too big a deal out of Emerson not getting his due, I doubt if Emerson ever lost much sleep over it. Laver's my favorite player, but he wasn't the only one shorted on Grand Slam titles by lack of open tennis, you have to think back to at least the 1930s for that. Budge, Riggs, Kramer?
     
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  4. pc1

    pc1 Legend

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    Krosero,

    Very interesting article but hate to say it but Agassi is right, no one believes Emerson is superior to Laver despite the fact Emerson had more majors than Laver.

    But you what, the point the article makes if Emerson entered the pros early and had the tough competition to improve his game is possibly true. It didn't happen but it is reasonable.

    Emerson was very talented with World Class Speed and great reflexes. There is no reason he wouldn't have eventually did well in the pros.
     
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  5. roundiesee

    roundiesee Hall of Fame

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    "You should never complain about an injury,” he once said. His take on the Aussie credo was succinct: “We believe that if you play, then you aren't injured, and that's that."

    Now why can't today's players live by this rule? It is so annoying to see players getting rub-downs at the changeover in almost every match. This should not be allowed at all especially in Grand Slam tournaments. Hats off to Emmo, one of the true greats in tennis!
     
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  6. coachrick

    coachrick Hall of Fame

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    Gotta tell my Emmo story. Mid-70s, Palmetto Dunes on Hilton Head Island...Laver and Emerson formed LET(Laver Emerson Tennis) and some pro celeb types are there for a tournament. Randy Vataha(Stanford/NE Patriots wide receiver) was working on his tennis for the popular "SuperStars" television competition(pro athletes competed OUTSIDE of their sports against other pros).

    Emmo was drilling Vataha, drop shot then lob, corner to corner, drop shot then lob..over and over. This is in sweltering island heat and I'll admit Randy Vataha could run faster BACKWARD(S) than I could FORWARD! To make a short story long, after drilling for 45 minutes or so, Emmo headed courtside, turned up a fresh Fosters oil can, finished it in just a few seconds and went BACK to the court for another session! This happened more than once and we watched in awe. This college student tennis bum hotdog was truly impressed! Emmo was probably all of 40 years old but he surely seemed ancient to me! Those Aussies really knew how to practice!

    As long as we're telling stories, as a pro shop manager, I usually wore flashy clothes during my younger days. It happened that Bob Seagren(Gold medal, Olympic pole vault) was there for the tournament and was wearing exactly the same Head outfit that I was. An attractive mother/daughter duo came up to me and asked for my autograph--knowing I had to be SOMEBODY since I dressed just like Bob Seagren of Pepsodent toothpaste commercials! Ah, the good old days!
     
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  7. coachrick

    coachrick Hall of Fame

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    As Newk and Emmo would say, "If you take the court, then you're fit to play. No excuses." Words to live by, I reckon.
     
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  8. hoodjem

    hoodjem G.O.A.T.

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    Tell that to Rosewall.
     
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  9. pc1

    pc1 Legend

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    Although not as old as Rosewall, Connors won a few majors in 1982 and 1983. He won Wimbledon and the US Open in 82 and the US Open in 83. He was in his early 30's at that point but barely over 30 in 1982.
     
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  10. hoodjem

    hoodjem G.O.A.T.

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    True that. Connors looked very sharp when he made that run at the USO in the late 80s.

    But I do think Muscles must hold some sort of record.
     
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  11. pc1

    pc1 Legend

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    Muscles was still beating top players in his late thirties. He beat Roscoe Tanner, John Newcombe and Stan Smith on his way to getting beaten by Connors in the 1974 Wimbledon final.

    I don't think an old Connors in his late thirties was capable of defeating the top players the way Rosewall was able to in his late thirties. Connors had a great draw in the 1991 US Open final before getting beaten by Jim Courier.

    I think Rosewall is definitely one of the candidates for strongest player ever in his late thirties and early forties. Of course Rosewall is one of the candidates for strongest player at any age.
     
    Last edited: Jan 24, 2010
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  12. borg number one

    borg number one Legend

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    Along with Emerson, Rosewall and Connors, Pancho Gonzales was also a great player well into his late 30's-early 40's. He got to the semifinals of the French on slow red clay at 40!!!

    See this excerpt on him from Wikipedia:

    Most of Gonzales's career as a professional fell before the start of the Open Era of tennis in 1968, and he was therefore ineligible to compete at the Grand Slam events between 1949 (when he turned pro) and 1967. As has been observed about other great players such as Rod Laver, Gonzales almost certainly would have won a number of additional Grand Slam titles had he been permitted to compete in those tournaments during that 18-year period. Jack Kramer, for instance, has speculated in an article about the theoretical champions of Forest Hills and Wimbledon that Gonzales would have won an additional 11 titles in those two tournaments alone.

    The first major Open tournament was the French Championships in May 1968, when Gonzales had just turned 40. In spite of the fact that he had been semi-retired for a number of years and that the tournament was held on slow clay courts that penalize serve-and-volley players, Gonzales beat the 1967 defending champion Roy Emerson in the quarterfinals. He then lost in the semi-finals to Rod Laver. He lost in the third round of Wimbledon but later beat the second-seeded Tony Roche in the fourth round of the United States Open before losing an epic match to Holland's Tom Okker.



    Emerson:

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    Connors:

    [​IMG]


    Rosewall:

    [​IMG]


    Gonzales:

    [​IMG]
     
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  13. jnd28

    jnd28 Rookie

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    Yes it's true that Emmo was not as good as Laver, but he was pretty darn good! Along with his 12 major singles titles I believe he had 14 major doubles titles for a very impressive 28 total majors. A record that will probably never be equaled on the mens side.

    I have brought this up before but in my humble opinion in order to be an all time great, doubles needs to be part of the equation. Otherwise you are only taking about the greatest singles player of all time - not the greatest tennis player.
     
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  14. hoodjem

    hoodjem G.O.A.T.

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    I'm right there with you on this topic!
     
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