Should a stringer know?

Discussion in 'Strings' started by lenosucks, Jul 6, 2004.

  1. lenosucks

    lenosucks New User

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2004
    Messages:
    83
    Should a stringer know if a racquet is one piece or two-piece? And if a two piece racket is strung as one piece, does it really make a difference?
     
    #1
  2. mr. stevo

    mr. stevo Rookie

    Joined:
    May 1, 2004
    Messages:
    132
    i think it's more of a stringer's preference then the racket's reccommended method/style. but that's just my 2 cents, i'm a newb stringer. Is there such thing as a racket that is meant to only be strung for one style?
     
    #2
  3. lenosucks

    lenosucks New User

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2004
    Messages:
    83
    well when you look on the specs for a racquet on this site, it tells you whether it's one piece or two piece stringing
     
    #3
  4. coachrick

    coachrick Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2004
    Messages:
    2,157
    Location:
    Austin, hook 'em, Texas
    If the stringer is not sure, he/she should check the mfg recommendation. Usually, the two piece method is used to allow the cross strings to be installed from top to bottom of the stringbed. It is possible to use various around-the-world methods to string a two-piece recommended frame with only one piece. Wouldn't shoot the stringer just yet...
     
    #4
  5. David Pavlich

    David Pavlich Professional

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2004
    Messages:
    1,203
    As has been typed so many times before, the conventional wisdom and the fear of cracking a frame dictates that the crosses are strung from head to throat.

    With that in mind, you will find most places that have stringing patterns will not show instructions for one piece stringing for frames that have the mains ending at the throat. Wilson is the exception to this generality, however.

    The reason for this is because the weakest area of a frame is the upper hoop. Stringing the crosses from the throat up puts a lot of stress on the upper hoop. Therefore, the manufacturers show only a 2 piece pattern.

    Of course, they don't mention stringing one piece using the ubiquitous Around The World pattern, which allows a stringer to do a 1 piece job AND start the crosses at the head.

    For info on ATW, check throughout this section. It's everywhere!

    David
     
    #5
  6. Gaines Hillix

    Gaines Hillix Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2004
    Messages:
    4,240
    lenos, any competent stringer should know if a racquet calls for a 1 piece or 2 piece job or have access to reference material that does. Most frames can be strung either way, but the manufacturer specifies only one or the other on some frames. As others have said, a 1 piece ATW pattern can be used to string most frames that call for a 2 piece pattern. It should be possible to string any frame using 2 pieces with the crosses done head to throat.
     
    #6
  7. gregraven

    gregraven Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Apr 22, 2004
    Messages:
    617
    In some cases, it makes a huge difference. Some Head and Prince frames, for example, demand two-piece stringing, as the frame may fail if strung using a conventional one-piece method, and because of the improperly stringing technique, the frame will be considered out of warranty.
     
    #7
  8. Bryan Aldridge

    Bryan Aldridge Rookie

    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2004
    Messages:
    126
    I think a very important point to bring up is consistancy. I had one customer who I strung a brand new Liquidmetal instinct for, 2 piece stringing, head to throat. He had his racquet strung by someone else at a later date, and they used the conventional one piece method (not Around the world). Because I had strung the racquet 2 piece, head to throat, and he strung the racquet 1 piece throat to head, the frame cracked at 12 o'clock. I think this is even worse than stringing throat to head everytime because it stresses out the frame in different areas. Just my opinion though.
     
    #8
  9. Steve Huff

    Steve Huff Legend

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2004
    Messages:
    7,272
    Yonex recommends their rackets be strung using a 2-piece method. Some Head models do too, but I think that using an ATW won't void their warranty. All rackets should have their crosses strung from head to throat unless it is recommended by the manufacturer to string from throat to head (only one comes to mind--the Prince TT Ring). Wilson says it's ok to string most of their rackets from throat to head, but I wouldn't. When you use a 2-piece, they recommend going from head to throat, so I'd take that as going head to throat is the BEST method. An ATW would accomplish that too.
     
    #9
  10. David Pavlich

    David Pavlich Professional

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2004
    Messages:
    1,203
    Steve, you're correct that ATW won't void a warrant. I've sent in racquets to Head, Dunlop and Prince that were cracked and all strung ATW by me. All were warranted as long as the frames were within the warranty period and didn't show signs of abuse. Some even showed signs of "anger management", but were warranteed anyway.

    David
     
    #10

Share This Page