Should tourneys be cancelled if over 105 degrees?

Discussion in 'Adult League & Tournament Talk' started by ttwarrior1, Jun 29, 2012.

  1. mark1

    mark1 Semi-Pro

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    Hell no.

    3rd set 10pt tiebreakers are ridiculous as is.

    Tennis is about fitness as well.

    Jeez, man up
     
    #51
  2. West Coast Ace

    West Coast Ace G.O.A.T.

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    Great post.

    At least didn't go over and start watching the guys playing in the 18's... :)

    As someone with shoulder issues, I wouldn't want to play 3 matches in a day for that reason. Heat - same for everyone.
     
    #52
  3. IA-SteveB

    IA-SteveB Professional

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    Yeah, everyone in any given tournament is completely fit and tolerant of ANY conditions. Weak argument.
     
    #53
  4. NLBwell

    NLBwell Legend

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    Yes, that is the correct assumption. If someone has a problem it is up to them to take care of themselves and withdraw.
     
    #54
  5. mark1

    mark1 Semi-Pro

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    See below. Not in shape? Then get in shape or deal with the consequences of being out of shape and playing tennis.

    How many hand outs do you need? We don't even have real 3rd sets anymore, pathetic.

     
    #55
  6. IA-SteveB

    IA-SteveB Professional

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    My point is, at some point you have to protect people from themselves and tournament directors do think about this. These are not highly trained athletes in tune with their bodies, you being the exception of course. Some of them may not understand how to read what is happening to their bodies. Yes, it may be expected that people should be in shape before subjecting themselves to extreme conditions, but it just isn't the case. Being in tennis shape and being able to tolerate extreme conditions are two different things. You may be an upper echelon Conan the Barbarian, but not everyone is. :) I don't need any handouts personally, but thanks.
     
    Last edited: Jul 15, 2012
    #56
  7. mark1

    mark1 Semi-Pro

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    Like the other guy said, if you can't handle the heat, then withdraw. Where is the personal responsibility of the players? Other people need them to manage for them? Why punish those who do work to be in appropriate physical condition for the tournament?

    As far as my conditioning, I work hard as to be able to handle the heat as much as possible. I still get tired, and can always improve. Its part of the game, just like a volley, ground stroke or serve.

    Lack of fitness is a deficiency in someones game, just like a bad second serve.

    Agree to disagree
     
    Last edited: Jul 15, 2012
    #57
  8. Govnor

    Govnor Professional

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    I took some peanuts with me for my match today! Thanks all! It wasn't that hot, but it was very humid.
     
    #58
  9. Baxter

    Baxter Professional

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    No water? That can't be good.
     
    #59
  10. floridatennisdude

    floridatennisdude Hall of Fame

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    do you realize that you are basically saying, "Get in shape or die"? That is a consequence of being out of shape and playing 3 sets of tennis in 100+ weather.

    Just strikes me as a bit harsh.
     
    #60
  11. Govnor

    Govnor Professional

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    Water, Gatorade and a Banana were also present!
     
    #61
  12. Baxter

    Baxter Professional

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    Those spray bottles with the little electric fans on top are very popular at out local late July (always in the 90s, sometimes over 100)tournament.

    As to fitness, if you do well in this tournament and have entered multiple events, (three are allowed) you could find yourself playing three and sometimes four matches (real three setters, this is not USTA) on the Saturday before the finals. That's a LOT of tennis in a LOT of heat, and that kind of scheduling could take even the fittest person down with dehydration or heat stroke.
     
    #62
  13. mark1

    mark1 Semi-Pro

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    Taking it out of context much?

    Clearly medical staff should always be present in a tournament, and a player who isn't feeling right should know to at least ask for a break if they are struggling with the heat.

    I know I've played in matches where some players have struggled with heat and never had an issue with them taking time to make sure they are ok and can continue on.
     
    #63
  14. floridatennisdude

    floridatennisdude Hall of Fame

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    The only tournaments I have been to with medical staff on site are pro tourneys. Even at Futures or Challengers, it was a trainer and not an MD. Never seen one at an NTRP tournament. Ever.

    And I took nothing out of context, btw. Just took your post literally.
     
    Last edited: Jul 16, 2012
    #64
  15. Baxter

    Baxter Professional

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    Our local tournament (Taco Bell, which everybody calls Taco Hell of course) attracts over 500 players of all ages and skill levels, and I can assure you, the only medical personnel are out playing on the courts. Someone is going to die at this tournament sooner or later. I was considering a trip to the emergency room last year after my third (or was it fourth, my brain was fried) match but toughed it out in a walk in beer cooler! Scheduling senior singles matches at three in the afternoon in late July in the desert reeks of elder abuse, IMO.

    BTW, I'm in great shape and play doubles and singles four times a week, but every degree over 95 or so has an impact. Over 100 really is brutal.
     
    Last edited: Jul 16, 2012
    #65
  16. purple-n-gold

    purple-n-gold Professional

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    I have played tourneys here NC, with 100+ on-court temp where you had 2 hrs maybe between singles matches. What made it really tough was participating in 2 events!
     
    #66
  17. r2473

    r2473 Legend

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    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WgScBiXkO9Y
     
    Last edited: Jul 16, 2012
    #67
  18. mark1

    mark1 Semi-Pro

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    Right, because I said that I thought people should play until they die.

    Good luck finding the post where I said those words.

    Anyway, ive said my piece. Carry on.
     
    #68
  19. floridatennisdude

    floridatennisdude Hall of Fame

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    Good point, I guess there is usually a few doctors around. Playing, of course. It's not like a $30 entry fee includes 24/7 staffed emergency personnel.

    Curious, do they make folks sign medical waivers for that event? I have played some that do, but most don't.
     
    #69
  20. Baxter

    Baxter Professional

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    No, I've never signed anything except a check for this one and I've playing it since 1998.
     
    #70
  21. 3fees

    3fees Hall of Fame

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    No- wind, heat, cold , and pleasant conditions are part of the game, either adjust your game to it and or your body-liquids,salt, ect..

    Cheers
    3fees :)
     
    #71
  22. Mongolmike

    Mongolmike Professional

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    Yeah, but that would suck dying all alone....


    :razz:
     
    #72
  23. jc4.0

    jc4.0 Professional

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    First - three, 3-set matches in one day? Even if it was 70 degrees you got a tough day at the office! I'd never make it if it was 105. Here - humidity is a huge factor. The temp may only be 90-95 but with 80% humidity your sweat doesn't evaporate so it's hard to stay cool.

    If you decide to play - of course, hydrate well and often, take some minerals after you sweat for an hour or so: salt, potassium, magnesium. Eat bananas and drink coconut water. But most important, if you start feeling heat exhaustion, retire from the tournament. Early symptoms: fatigue, nausea, cramps. next stage is Heat Stroke, which can kill you. That's when your body can't produce enough sweat to cool you down, and your brain basically boils in your head. Symptoms include turning white and passing out.

    I must've lost a quart of sweat today, but I took the above advice - plus I'm used to the heat.
     
    #73
  24. dParis

    dParis Hall of Fame

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    Admit it. The only reason you cared was because it meant more food for you at the Golden Corral buffet after the match.
     
    #74
  25. Baxter

    Baxter Professional

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    Good one! I played a tournament this weekend. Temps were in the high nineties. I played three short matches yesterday and was fine (two doubles, one 0 and 0 singles).

    Today I played two singles matches, one at 9 and one at 11. I won the second match 3 and 4, but I did NOT feel good afterwards, and would have asked for a ten point tie break in lieu of a third had I lost the second. I'm 57 and I'm going to tell the TD at this week's tournament that two matches per day is my limit.
     
    #75
  26. Govnor

    Govnor Professional

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    I have a match today. It will be the hottest temp I've ever played in, so I'm going to be very aggressive and get points over with a quickness (win or lose).
     
    #76
  27. Baxter

    Baxter Professional

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    One of my prizes for winning the singles championship yesterday was an evaporative cooling bandana. You have to soak in ice water for about ten minutes, but it works great and now I have that vintage Borg/MacEnroe look! They should have given them to everybody at the beginning of the tournament.
     
    Last edited: Jul 23, 2012
    #77
  28. Govnor

    Govnor Professional

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    that sounds nice!!
     
    #78
  29. Baxter

    Baxter Professional

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    It will be 97 F in Grand Junction tomorrow. I have a singles match at 11 and a doubles at 2:30. For the first time ever, a real third set is not mandatory.
     
    #79
  30. aniretake

    aniretake New User

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    In GA league they do cancel, but i also play in SC league and we had 102F outside and heat index 106F - and still played. Just beacuse LLC doesnt like rescheduling.:(
     
    #80
  31. IA-SteveB

    IA-SteveB Professional

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    I agree. There are a lot of people who wrongly think they can tough it out and the outcome can be disasterous. Everyone reacts differently to heat and even the best preparation can't overcome people thinking they are capable of handling it. You don't know you are in trouble until it is far too late to do anything but have direct medical attention and IV fluids. As I said before, at some point, people need to be protected from themselves. I am not saying the fault lies with a tournament director if people can't police their own health and readiness, but if I was a director the thought would be in my mind that I would want to deal with risk management. Some people are just too stubborn to know their limits. I commend all of the people who are able to handle it and I bow to you.

    Some people can confuse heat prostration and exhaustion with just being tired from the heat. I know, because it happened to me. Since that horrible experience, I know EXACTLY what my body is telling me and I listen. :)
     
    Last edited: Aug 6, 2012
    #81
  32. ttwarrior1

    ttwarrior1 Professional

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    has a match ever been cancelled because of cold, i actually played on a court with ice on it once
     
    #82
  33. Babolatbarry

    Babolatbarry Guest

    I had a tennis match for a tourney during the superbowl last year lol, it was 39 degrees fahrenheit....I THINK* but I'm not positive, judging by my memory here
     
    #83
  34. goran_ace

    goran_ace Hall of Fame

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    Rules in college set a minimum of 50 degrees, but I've played in far below that because my coach and the opposing coach agreed it was ok.
     
    #84
  35. cll30

    cll30 Rookie

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    I have also.
     
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  36. Baxter

    Baxter Professional

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    I play in the high 30s and 40s all winter long. As long as the sun is out it's no biggie.
     
    #86
  37. floridatennisdude

    floridatennisdude Hall of Fame

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    I don't play when the high is under 40. Only a couple weeks a year that I avoid playing.
     
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  38. Mauvaise

    Mauvaise Rookie

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    I learned a very valuable lesson about playing 4+ hours of strenuous tennis in high (Phoenix) heat: Make sure you eat!

    I actually got heat exhaustion (I don't think it made it all the way to heat stroke) on Saturday during a tournament. It was a night tourney and we started playing at 6pm. I had eaten a good sized breakfast at 9.30AM, but nothing after that. I drank plenty of water mixed with Vitamin Water, but no more food. At about the 4-hour mark it hit.

    My partner and I won our first match in a tight 3 setter (6-3, 4-6, 6-4) and were in the third set of our second match (against the #2 seed). We had won the first set 6-3, lost the second 2-6, and were up an unbelievable 5-1 in the deciding third when it happened. Our opponents were serving 15-30 to me and right as I was following the server's ball toss the first wave of nausea hit.

    Somehow I managed to finish out the point (which we lost via an UE by me). I immediately ran off the court before the ball had bounced twice, mumbling to my partner as I rushed past that I thought I was going to be sick. Some people brought me an ice pack and I sat down for about 10 minutes. I thought I would try to finish out the match (we *were* two points from winning the darn thing) so I mustered everything I had and went back out there.

    It quickly became apparent that things were not going to go well because I couldn't run. I was ok if the ball came right to me and I could execute a short halfhearted trot, but running full tilt was out. I warned my partner and we went to work. We ended up losing that game and I took my change over in the pro shop with an ice pack.

    I was supposed to serve next, the score was 5-2. I just needed to get it together for one more (hopefully) game. But every time I stood up, I'd get dizzy and the nausea would roll over my body in sickening waves. My partner said I was turning white and he talked me into my decision to retire.

    It was heartbreaking because 1) we were so close to the upset and 2) I have honestly never played better than I had those first 5 games - I was in the zone where it felt like I had 5 minutes to set myself up for every shot and the ball was the size of a softball. I've never been in the zone like that before. I also felt horrible for my partner, but he was very gracious about it, and in fact insisted that we stop. It took me 20 minutes before I felt I could stand long enough to walk to the car. My opponent drove me home in my car and had someone follow to drive her back because everyone was concerned I'd pass out on the way home. All in all - not a good experience.

    I still contend that it wasn't the heat so much as the lack of food after 4+ hours of tennis in the heat.

    But learn from my fail: EAT! Before, and during!
     
    Last edited: Aug 23, 2012
    #88
  39. Govnor

    Govnor Professional

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    Oh yeah, you have to eat. Professional soccer players eat a full meal about 2.5 hours before a game. That tells me how important it is to go into a match with something yummy in my tummy.
     
    #89
  40. Sumo

    Sumo Semi-Pro

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    It's the same with the cold out west.
     
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