Should you up the tension on the last pull before tying?

Discussion in 'Stringing Techniques / Stringing Machines' started by sstchur, Jun 29, 2009.

  1. sstchur

    sstchur Hall of Fame

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    Someone told me that I should up the tension 3 to 5 lbs on the last pull before trying off when using a dropweight stringer. Is this true?
     
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  2. jim e

    jim e Hall of Fame

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    The type of machine does not matter. Important thing is to learn to tie a good cinched up knot, where you can pull out most of the slack on it.
    Many stringers up the tie off tensions, and many do not. There are no rules at this time governing this issue. The USRSA says it is not necessary, but also says it does not do any harm if you do, therefore they are keeping neutral on this issue at the present time.The key is to be consistant in whatever you choose!

    That said, my take on this is I up the tie offs 10%. That is why the machine manufactures put that knot button there. This keeps the end strings at same tension as the rest of the strings. I know that you do not hit with the end strings, but really no reason not to make them the same. It also keeps the end mains straighter do to the off set weave of the adjacent main, which is a good reason for me to follow this practice. Also many customers will pull on that end main , just to see if it is loose. I have seen this over and over again, and many customers will pull on the end mains and judge your job by this. Some may not do that in front of you, many will, and the others will at a later time. I have even had customers pull on the end mains with an ATW job, where the tie offs were on crosses only! Figure that!So it keeps the customer happy. Also many slam stringers up the tie offs, I know Tim S. from gss who is on the Wilson string team, and strings for the slam events ups his 5kgs. Also R. Parnell ups his tie offs as well. They also said that most tour stringers up the tie offs as well.
    You have to decide that one for yourself, as there are a good # of stringers that do not up the tie offs as well.
    The key is to be consistant in whatever you choose!
     
    Last edited: Jun 29, 2009
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  3. CharlieB

    CharlieB New User

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    I even ask my stringer (working on his electronic machine) to increase the tension by at least 3 pounds on the last 2 rows to compensate for tension loss during the knot tying. But this is a bit a personal choice. A good stringer professional will not loose too much tension while finishing mains or verticals. Cheers, Charlie
     
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  4. SpinDog

    SpinDog Rookie

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    Agreed, and it’s not as if the tension gains or losses are held captive in each individual string. The losses and gains get distributed naturally across the string bed soon after stringing and certainly after the racquet is played. I’m not saying that the tensions of each string equalize, I’m saying that tension will be distributed in a natural way across the string bed depending upon the dynamics of the frame system. This distribution tends to minimize the effect. This point is the dividing line where the discussion turns more to string bed stiffness rather than tension and is a result of the additional influences imposed by a melding of the racquet’s combined characteristics. This is actually a good thing because you really wouldn’t want any tension ‘hot spots’ between individual strings. If good stringing practices are used the small loss introduced by tying a knot will be distributed across the entire string bed and have very little effect on the overall string bed stiffness. There really should be very little if any perceivable difference when the racquet is played (for most non-pro players). I’ve tried both and can see no difference in playability but then again I can’t say that I’m entirely qualified to make that determination. There are probably a lot of people on this forum that are more in tune with their racquet’s performance / playability and can comment further. I’m sure the pros do it because their clients probably can tell the difference. I’d be surprised if Roddick or Federer couldn’t detect a difference in playability as the result of small tension losses. IMO I believe that for most players there are other factors that are of bigger concern, string elongation characteristics for one. In this regard upping the tension would help. At the end of the day it’s all in what you’re used to (and like). If you like the way your racquet plays then don’t change a thing in your stringing process. Just concentrate on doing it exactly the same way the next time and the time after that and so on.
     
    Last edited: Jun 29, 2009
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  5. atennisrand

    atennisrand Banned

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    I pull an extra half a kg on the last cross string at thats it, probably more consistent not to do this at all but my machine is not the greatest and I believe it compensates well for my stringing.
     
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  6. Steve Huff

    Steve Huff Legend

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    I add 6#'s on my tie-offs (about the same as Jim's 10%). Just from experimenting, that's about what I've figured I loose on the tie-off. USRSA says it doesn't really matter. If a person is stringing 65#, I don't like to crank 61# on the tie-off. I'll go up to what I think the string and racket can hold safely in those cases.
     
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  7. jefferson

    jefferson Semi-Pro

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    I go up 3 lbs on the last tension prior to tie off. Some string is tough to pull manually when tying off. Especially a poly, i think the 3 lbs helps with a more consistent job
     
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  8. Il Mostro

    Il Mostro Banned

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    +10% for me.

    Edit: Tension increase refers to knots. I double pull the hard weaves. As Jim states, consistency is the key however you choose to string.
     
    Last edited: Jul 5, 2009
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  9. Mansewerz

    Mansewerz Legend

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  10. Koz

    Koz Rookie

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    I don't personally, but would have no problem if a customer requested it. If you strike a ball on the last main or last cross, I think the last thing you'll have to worry about is if that string is 2lbs looser than the one next to it :p. I actually prefer a bit more forgiveness out near the outside of the frame...remember when proportional stringing was popular around here? (This may have been before the vBulletin days??)
     
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  11. jim e

    jim e Hall of Fame

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    I'll tell you, customers pull on the end mains, and they will judge your job on that, as they do not know much else.They may not all pull on that string in front of you, but before the day is over, they will at some point, I saw this years ago when I strung in the 60's , and they still do that today! I even had customers tug on that end main, when I strung a 1 piece!It is the last thing you have to worry about as you say, but try to convince a customer that, when they feel that they are correct!.Just keeping the customer happy is what its about, and yes you do not hit with that end main, and yes since you don't then there is no harm in increasing it any ways.It keeps the end main straighter do to the off set weave of the adjacent main as well, and those that string an ATW, I never heard of any of them lowering the end mains since you do not really use them, so there are enought reasons for me to increase them.
     
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  12. dancraig

    dancraig Hall of Fame

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    Hello Jim
    I think one reason the outside mains tend to move more easily is because they aren't "locked" in by having strings on both sides. The pressure of adjacent mains helps hold the others in place, while the outside strings will slip around very easily.
    Sometimes I give this information to customers I suspect are checking those outside mains.
     
    Last edited: Jul 5, 2009
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  13. Il Mostro

    Il Mostro Banned

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    ^^^^

    Bingo!
     
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  14. jim e

    jim e Hall of Fame

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    That is why I said when you up the tie offs the end mains remain straighter due to the off set weave of the adjacent mains. And then there is no explinations , customers still feel there is something wrong even though you explain, best solution is to just up the tie offs just like most of the tour stringers, and slam stringers do.Everyone is happier, and you do not have to explain to the ones you think are concerned.
     
    Last edited: Jul 6, 2009
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