Shoulder Issues -- Therapies, Surgeries, Etc.

Discussion in 'Health & Fitness' started by Spittle, Feb 3, 2008.

  1. larry10s

    larry10s Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2008
    Messages:
    3,976
    great to hear its over and the doc could do it with the scope. your first night is so much better than gary. hope the recovery goes smoothly.
     
  2. GZim

    GZim Rookie

    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2009
    Messages:
    130
    Location:
    NY
    Freddy,

    Great to hear it went well and that you are doing so well. Did you have the nerve block?
    I am making much better progress finally (I am 10 weeks post op) and finally starting to sleep much better. My ROM is also improving, but I am still stuck in some directions. My front elevation is up to 140 without having my scapula pop out the side like it was a few weeks ago. I can now wash my hair with both hands!
    I see my surgeon again next week and I hope to be completely cleared for all active strengthening> I can see my muscles on the back of my shoulder blade coming back, and I am doing a lot of internal and external rotation, and rear delt exercises with the resistance bands.
    I can't wait to hit some ground strokes, but I think serving is a few months away.

    Gary
     
  3. FastFreddy

    FastFreddy Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2008
    Messages:
    755
    gas, yuck

    did not have nerve block, which is a regional anesthesia like spinal or epidural. i had general anesthesia(completely asleep) 3hrs of endotracheal anesthesia thur a tube placed in my mouth down trachea(windpipe). last night i slept like a baby no pain i sleep on my left side so no bigger for me.

    i will go to work today for a half day just need to ice it to help it heal not for pain. zero pain is so nice, a few weeks ago it was pretty bad wanted to chop off my arm to get rid of the dull pain. well you should improve more in the next 6 weeks its a slow process sometimes it seems like you are going the wrong way. my first two times i did not play for 7 months better to fully heal than rush it back like the pros do only to not fully heal and still have pain, loss of rom, strength or worst case retear. still have a liitle taste of metal in my mouth it's from the tube they put something on it to slide it down your windpipe.
     
  4. FastFreddy

    FastFreddy Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2008
    Messages:
    755
    thanks

    yeah lucked out did not have the mini open. everyone is different sounds like gary is having a rough time with his recovery.
     
  5. larry10s

    larry10s Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2008
    Messages:
    3,976
    fastfreddy why do you think you have so little pain and gary was/is suffering for weeks?
     
  6. FastFreddy

    FastFreddy Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2008
    Messages:
    755
    not sure

    the only thing i can think of is the first time i torn the tendon off the bone 3 days of hell and waited 5 years to fix. maybe that rasied my pain leve over 5 years of dull pain. plus i did play ice hockey for 13 years that did make me tougher i got hit with pucks, sticks, skates in the face so i guess i been to the er more than most people, it was my 2nd home when i was playing. what did gary have done again? mine was simple sew the tendon and remove two bone spurs.
     
  7. GZim

    GZim Rookie

    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2009
    Messages:
    130
    Location:
    NY
    Freddy,
    I am very happy for you not having any pain.

    I have never felt I was going backwards, just my recovery is slow. Developing adhesive capsulitis is a *****! I had a fully torn superspinatus, they used 5 anchors to reattach, also had 2 bone spurs remove (he said 1 was large) and cleaned up my labrum.
    The pain is way down to just an ache/stiffness when I wake up, no more pain meds.


    Best wishes for a speedy recovery.
     
  8. FastFreddy

    FastFreddy Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2008
    Messages:
    755
    pt

    sounds almost the same as mine. i don't know how many anchors but will ask him on my visit on the 21st. i had no clean up on my labrum but he had to remove 1 cm from my acromion because it had arthritis not like old people he said it was from heavy lifting.

    i also have a bump on my ac joint but did not shave it down since i have no pain there. also to remove that he would have to open me up there. i am happy i just have 4 holes, i thought i would only get three i have to ask why four. my tear like yours was bigger then he saw on my mri since mri is not 5 d. two bone spurs like you. did you have scope and or mini open or full open surgery?

    when i did my pt for my first two times i would leave pt sometimes in pain from the pt thats what i meant by going backwards. but in the end i knew it would work maybe because my coworker and friend worked there. i had adhesive problems with my sapulpa the first surgery since the tendon was off the bone for 5 years. 10 weeks out sounds like you have 6 more weeks of pt they you will be on your own for the rest of pt.

    i over used my other cuff and upperback muscles. but i really think the problem was that dam sling keeping your arm like that made my whole arm and shoulder stiff. i think 6 weeks in a sling is way to long. this time no sling at all my hanging arm feels so relaxing and good. i think they put people in the sling not so much because of the arms weight is bad, traction is good for the arm newly sewed up tendon. so as long as you don't use it to lift anything or raise your arm above you head i don't see a need for the sling. but most people would be temped to use it and screw up the docs work. i bet my pt would have went faster without the sling.

    i took off my bloddy dressing yesterday and put four bandaids today i get to shower nice. i smell since monday night was my last shower. i rode the spin bike for 30 mins yesterday , today i will do one hour get that blood flowing to my tendon plus i am bored hanging in the house. ps shifting my car lefty is fun. start in 2nd then to 4th and i also do 3rd to 5th. good luck to you gary
     
  9. FastFreddy

    FastFreddy Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2008
    Messages:
    755
    Update

    One week out today just ice 3-4 times a day. Will see doctor this friday no find out the tear size. It was 2.8 by 3.5 on the mri which is a year and a half old. Full complete tear would be 4 by 5cm
     
  10. GZim

    GZim Rookie

    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2009
    Messages:
    130
    Location:
    NY
    Cleared for light hitting

    Went to the surgeon today, and I am cleared for light ground strokes this weekend (its 12 weeks post op).
    I still have some adhesive capsulitis, but my ROM is improving and my strength is also starting to return. in PT he had my front elevation up to 160 without pain, just a good stretch. Feels like there are rubber bands which are too tight inside. Some movements cause my whole shoulder to raise instead of the arm gliding,,, but I am much better these past few weeks.

    2 weeks of goundies, then 2 weeks of volleys then I can serve.

    I am psyched to hit some this weekend.
     
  11. FastFreddy

    FastFreddy Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2008
    Messages:
    755
    nice

    Sounds good Gary have fun hitting. How many weeks of PT did your insurance give you 15 weeks ?
     
    Last edited: May 19, 2010
  12. GZim

    GZim Rookie

    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2009
    Messages:
    130
    Location:
    NY
    not sure, I think it was like 20+ something....

    I am psyched. Going to restring my 2nd racquet with gut on the loose side. I want it nice and soft (and I play with a soft racquet - Yonex RDS 002 Tour)
     
  13. larry10s

    larry10s Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2008
    Messages:
    3,976
    i play with vs team (gut ) at 44lbs. no problem
    great to hear the progress:)
     
  14. GZim

    GZim Rookie

    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2009
    Messages:
    130
    Location:
    NY
    Wow Larry, that is the loosest I have heard. I was thinking of ordering 52 and 54 instead of my usual 60 just to back it off some, but I already am playing with a pretty soft racquet. Curious what stick do you use, and more importantly, how is your shoulder?

    You should have seen my smile when he said I could start to hit this weekend. I can't wait to go to the club.

    Gary
     
  15. larry10s

    larry10s Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2008
    Messages:
    3,976
    i play with vantage 95 16x19 63 ra 12.2 oz strung / 12.5 oz strung 8 points hl/10-11 points hl. 2 versions of racquets. all strung at 44. used to string at 54 tried a friends vantage strung at 40!!! felt so soft and the ball didnt spray!!!! so i tried lower and have had no problems with control. an occasional spray but i assume thats me.:oops: i figured 44 must be better than 54 for my arm.
    the shoulder is doing well since ive been consistent with the shoulder exercises. its not normal as it aches some if i play too long and try to serve hard. slice serves if i really try to go around the ball arent good so i dont use that motion. i ice after playing and wil get another mri in a few months. ill monitor the muscle and when it shows progression with retraction ill start planning to have it repaired.
    great to know you have progressed to some hitting. just dont over do it.larry
     
  16. GZim

    GZim Rookie

    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2009
    Messages:
    130
    Location:
    NY
    Larry,
    I found this video, and I will be keeping this tip very much in mind when I am able to start serving again. My serve was always one of my strengths, and after this surgery and rehab, I hope it will become again.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lTRvxaBMh8s&feature=related
    check it out.
    also if you feel stiff before playing, using a hot pack to warm up your shoulder could also help to avoid furthering your injury, I will be wearing one while driving to the club.

    Gary
     
  17. FastFreddy

    FastFreddy Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2008
    Messages:
    755
    info

    Surgery-Specific Rotator Cuff Rehabilitation Program
    When it comes to rotator cuff tears and repairs, things are shifting in the orthopedic world. Surgeons are gradually moving from an all-open incision procedure to an all-closed arthroscopic operation. And along with it, physical therapists (PTs) are modifying the rehab program to match each patient's needs.

    Patient goals in having a rotator cuff repair are to get rid of pain, increase motion and strength, and improve function. The surgeon's goals are to gain high fixation strength (tendon-to-bone), reduce the gap between the torn tendon and bone, and restore mechanical stability of the shoulder. That means there has to be good healing of the tendon-to-bone that has the ability to hold up under repetitive load and force.

    Results of surgery depend on two things: good surgical repair and a surgery-specific rotator cuff rehab program. That means more than ever, PTs and orthopedic surgeons must be communicating with one another about what kind of surgery was done, what the patient needs, and the best way to approach functional rehabilitation.

    So, in this article, PTs and surgeons present information from both sides. The surgeons describe and discuss the three most likely types of rotator cuff repair techniques. These include 1) open rotator cuff repair, 2) mini-open rotator cuff repair, and 3) all-arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. A step-by-step summary of each procedure with photos of the incision site and size are included.

    The open-incision repair is used most often for large rotator cuff tears that leave the patient with significant scarring and adhesions in and around the joint. The torn tendon has retracted or pulled back into the soft tissues and is not easily retrieved or repaired arthroscopically.

    The major downside of this procedure is postoperative pain and the loss of muscle function because the deltoid muscle is cut to gain access to the damage. The pain can especially hinder progress in physical therapy. Slower recovery time is required.

    The mini-open repair uses arthroscopy to avoid cutting the deltoid muscle. The incision is slightly longer than with all-arthroscopic repair but shorter than the full open-repair incision. The surgeon can split the deltoid rather than cut it and insert the scope down between the two halves of the muscle. The repair procedure can be completed arthroscopically from there.

    Studies show that the results of the mini-open repair are similar to an open repair with up to 88 per cent of patients getting good-to-excellent long-term results. And finally, the all-arthroscopic repair is presented with some concerns about the procedure.

    Surgeons say that there are fewer cases of stiffness and infection with this surgical approach. But there aren't very many long-term studies to show how useful this method may be. And surgeons are still debating the best way to reattach the tendon to the bone arthroscopically.

    Most recently, a new technique called double-row sutures has been developed. This technique secures a larger area of the tendon down to the bone. This repair method may make it easier to begin rehab earlier and move it along faster. Double-row sutures may help with the need to move the joint to avoid stiffness without disrupting the healing process.

    But the bulk of this article is focused on the postoperative rehabilitation program following surgical treatment of rotator cuff tears. Patient education is important. Healing is slow. The patient must protect the repair site for at least 12 weeks. A special splint called an abduction pillow brace is used. The device fits under the arm. It is designed to place the shoulder in a protective position that avoids strain on the healing rotator cuff.

    The authors point out 12 important factors that affect the postoperative rehab program. These include characteristics of the tear (size, location, tissue quality) and many surgical factors (approach, timing, and fixation method). Patient characteristics and access to care can make a big difference. For example, smokers in poor health have greater risks for poor wound healing. Access to a supervised physical therapy versus an independent home program can affect the final outcomes, too.

    Therapists know that patients who have an open incision approach must be treated differently than an all-arthroscopic procedure. The difference comes back to the fact that the deltoid muscle is cut in a traditional open rotator cuff repair. For example, the patient must avoid contracting the deltoid muscle for up to eight weeks. It takes a full month longer for patients with an open-incision to regain their previous level of activity compared with even the mini-open repair.

    The rehab program moves along at a pace that is directly linked with the size of the tear. Larger tears with more tissue damage and greater retraction of the tendon take longer to rehab. A more conservative approach is used.

    The surgeon must let the therapist know the condition of the tear at the time of the surgery. Where was it located? How large was the tear and in which direction? Was it L-shaped, U-shaped, or crescent-shaped? What fixation method did the surgeon use to repair the tear (single-row sutures, double-row sutures, suture bridge)? The rehab timeline can then be matched to small, medium, and large tears. This is called surgery-specific rehabilitation.

    If more than one part of the rotator cuff is damaged, then more protection and a longer recovery period are allowed. The therapist must know if the anterior (front of the) rotator cuff, the posterior (back of the) rotator cuff, or both were damaged. This information is used to restrict or encourage direction and degree of shoulder range-of-motion and strengthening.

    Patients with traumatic (as opposed to wear and tear or degenerative) injuries tend to develop more stiffness postoperatively if they aren't treated more aggressively right from the start. Early repairs after the injury can be moved through therapy more rapidly. But patients with fair-to-poor quality of tissue require a slower, more cautious approach.

    Other factors therapists take into consideration when planning and carrying out a rehab program include which arm was affected (dominant versus nondominant), general health, smoking history, work status, and patient goals for return to sports or recreational activities.

    The physical therapists involved in co-authoring this article present some specific guidelines for therapists working with patients who have had a rotator cuff tear repair. Tips on how to introduce range-of-motion exercises to avoid stiffness without endangering the repair are offered. The same is done for muscle retraining and strengthening exercises. Some of the suggestions were based on previous studies published. Others provided are the result of years of clinical experience.

    Rhythmic stabilization exercises are used to activate the rotator cuff muscles but without actually strengthening the muscles. This is a safe and effective way to restore dynamic stabilization of the joint. Positioning and amount of force needed to achieve this result are described.

    The authors also provide four very nice tables in the appendix to guide the therapist in planning an appropriate rotator cuff repair rehabilitation program. As already mentioned, the first table shows the patient, surgical, and physician factors affecting the postoperative rehab program.

    The next two tables outline specific precautions, goals, and activities allowed day-by-day and week-by-week for small-to-medium tears and also for medium-to-large tears. Four phases are included from immediately after surgery all the way up to returning the patient to full work and sports activities.

    And finally, range-of-motion and strengthening exercises with diagrams and descriptions are provided. These can be given to patients with space left for the therapist to record number of repetitions and how long to hold each exercise
     
  18. larry10s

    larry10s Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2008
    Messages:
    3,976
    fastfreddy that was a great summary of what seems to have been a very detailed article. do you have a link to it???
     
  19. larry10s

    larry10s Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2008
    Messages:
    3,976
    gary one way ive reduced stress on my shoulder serving is i dont fully pronate. more ulnar deviation
     
  20. FastFreddy

    FastFreddy Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2008
    Messages:
    755
    info

    Sorry no link but that's everything. Went to see my Doctor's asst today, PT will start in one month for today for active. I will do some passive movements until then. Had my stiches taken out today, next doctor visit June 18th.
    I did find out my tear was L shaped. My biceps tendon and bicipital tendon looked good as well as my labrum. The articular surface of the geniod appeared good. The articular surface of the humeral head had mild chondromalcia present. Subscapularis looked fine too. My tear was the anterior portion of the supraspinatus it was largest in the medial to the lateral length and a small in the anterior to posterior length.
     
    Last edited: May 21, 2010
  21. FastFreddy

    FastFreddy Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2008
    Messages:
    755
  22. GZim

    GZim Rookie

    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2009
    Messages:
    130
    Location:
    NY
    Yesterday I hit for the first time since my surgery.
    I felt stiff but especially on any ball above my waist, and weak and difficult to take a full swing at it.
    It felt like my mind was trying to keep my elbow close to my body on my forehand. Low backhands felt ok, but I let many high balls go, or lightly sliced it back. My ankles and lower back are more sore than my shoulder, and my timing, pffftt....

    I will go hit again today at 3pm.

    Gary
     
  23. FastFreddy

    FastFreddy Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2008
    Messages:
    755
    nice

    Your only like 12 weeks out right seems early to me. I will do passive for 4 weeks then active for 8 weks then start strength 3 months out that should last 3 months then I will start hitting. I will wait 6-7 months so my tendon fully heals before hitting no rush for me since I been not hitting for 2 years what's another 7 months. Then start my Jolly training.
     
  24. larry10s

    larry10s Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2008
    Messages:
    3,976
    gary go slOw PLEASE
     
  25. GZim

    GZim Rookie

    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2009
    Messages:
    130
    Location:
    NY
    I don't have much choice, I cannot play,but,, it felt good to swing a racquet, especially on balls below my waist. Felt pretty wanky on balls above. Felt very good to move around and sweat. I thought I would be sore, but my shoulder feels better than before I played. I did stretch it out after.

    Gary
     
  26. FastFreddy

    FastFreddy Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2008
    Messages:
    755
    Gary how many weeks did you take pain pills and how many per day? You were also taking slepping pills toosince only 3hrs sleep on pills. You could not take both the same day?
     
  27. FastFreddy

    FastFreddy Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2008
    Messages:
    755
    Gary how many weeks did you take pain pills and how many per day? You were also taking slepping pills too since only 3hrs sleep on pills. You could not take both the same day?
     
    Last edited: May 22, 2010
  28. larry10s

    larry10s Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2008
    Messages:
    3,976
  29. FastFreddy

    FastFreddy Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2008
    Messages:
    755
    PT

    I start PT in one month unless the Doctor calls me to start earlier. I will just do some passive movements for one month. Then active for another 8 weeks. Next strength at 12 weeks out and that's 1-3 months on my own. My doctor will let me know how many PT appts I get with my insurance and best how to use them for me.

    I doubt I will get 3 times a week for 5 weeks then 2 times a week for for weeks, 1 time a week for 5 weeks. How's your shoulder what did you have done again and how many weks are you out? Just been icing 3-4 times a day for 20-30mins, no pain or stiffness. The scope job is way better than the open surgery I had the last two times 1996, 1999 but the scope wasn't as good back then or the doctors experience using it.
     
  30. ab70

    ab70 New User

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2009
    Messages:
    97
    FF, just to double check on one of your earlier posts... are you indeed out of sling and how does it feel this early on have no support for the repaired arm...

    Wish you a speedy recovery (speedy though for shoulder issues is not the way to go:))
     
  31. larry10s

    larry10s Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2008
    Messages:
    3,976
    did not have surgery. yet. see post 565
     
  32. FastFreddy

    FastFreddy Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2008
    Messages:
    755
    No sling

    I talked with my Doctor before the surgery and told him do I really need the sling. Since I had to wear the thing for my first two times. I was in a sling for like 4 weeks and my shoulder got super stiff and it felt like it slowed down my PT and recovery. But maybe since I had open style the first two times the shoulder needed the support. Since they cut the shoulder muscle to access the cuff tendon. So this time no sling not even one day (scope job) did not need mini open because the tendon was in good shape the weight of my arm (traction) feels so good. Just don't lift anything heavy, lift arm above head so you don't mess up the repair.

    I have no pain or stiffness. The tendon still needs a good 7 months to heal even if you feel you can hit and your rom is fine and strength feels good I would still wait 7 months before I would hit and start lifting heavy. It took me a god year after the first 7 months to get all of my strength back. Slow and steady is the way to go with PT. If you go to slow you won't heal right,too fast and you could retear it so it's a fine line. This surgery was cake compared to the open style. If I need a 2nd one on my left shoulder I could get it done at lunchtime with a local haha. I went back to work the next day last time I needed a week off and a few days.
     
    Last edited: May 23, 2010
  33. FastFreddy

    FastFreddy Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2008
    Messages:
    755
    surgery

    Larry have you had an mri yet, if so any tear show up? Sounds like you might need surgery. How long have you had this problem and how old are you? Some people once they get into their 50's elect to go the PT and shot route because they don't like the idea of surgery. I think it depends on your current health, fitness and how active you still are if you want to get surgery.
     
  34. larry10s

    larry10s Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2008
    Messages:
    3,976
    im 56 (57 in one week:eek:). ive had rotator cuff issues with my right shoulder for many years. 4-5 years ago had an mri showed partial tear in the supraspinatus and impingement and bursitis. pt ,cortisone shot i was fine.
    over the years occasionally my arm would "tweak" ie be alittle symptomatic.nothing some motrin and doing the exercises more consistently didnt iron out.
    this winter my shoulder started to ache. i got tendinitis in my right hand and went on mobic ( a one aday nsaid) for 3 weeks. hand got better. shoulder stayed achy so i got an mri. full thickness tear with 1mm retraction of supraspinatus as main finding. surgery was recommended. however at this time i could still play tennis was not in severe pain although alittle weak.
    started again with the shoulder exercises m-w-f- and play on t-th- sat -sun

    since then strenght better. minimal pain . i ice after playing and limit flat serves and high forehand volleys.
    got 5 opinions. all say at some point ill need surgery. 2 said if im not in pain and my arm is functional there is not a strong indication to go to surgery.
    alll say i should not wait until the muscle has atrophied and/or retracted alot since that will decrease my odds of a full recovery. so my plan is to repeat the mri in june (last mri was march) if not much change every 3-6 month mri unless my symptoms change.
     
  35. FastFreddy

    FastFreddy Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2008
    Messages:
    755
    As long as you are in good health if I were you I would get the surgery sooner then later. Since the bigger the tear gets and more retracted means you will need mini open or full open surgery not fun. With a smaller tear you can get a scope job instead. Believe me scope is way better then open style for recovery.
    Since you still play 4 times a week I would get it. If you only played once a week you could get away with ice, nsaid, shot and PT movements. But the cortisone shots are bad for the tendon. Once you get a tear in your tendon it only gets bigger over time never gets smaller. Plus you have to deal with lack of strength, rom, dull pain not fun.
     
    Last edited: May 24, 2010
  36. larry10s

    larry10s Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2008
    Messages:
    3,976
    taking 1-2 months off work ( i need my right arm to work) is a major obstacle i cant make myself volunteer for when im not so symptomatic.mini vs arthro im not sure make a big difference in recovery but how they attach the tendon might be better with mini for long term strength
    im monitoring my muscle and will opt for siurgery when all indications say its time.
    if i were retired id do it now
     
  37. FastFreddy

    FastFreddy Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2008
    Messages:
    755
    Time

    Very true work comes first plus you need good insurance, good Doctor, time and energy for PT program. I seen alot of people get surgery worker's comp cases and don't do the PT and or in fair health and don't heal right. Next they blame the PT guy and the Doctor. For the PT to work you have to follow what they tell you most people just don't do the movements on their own. Even going PT 3 times a week I needed to do the movements 3 times a day on your own that's alot of time. My friend who worked there PT asst told me they can tell if your putting in the work and who is just saying they did.
     
  38. larry10s

    larry10s Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2008
    Messages:
    3,976
    of course the pts can tell whos doing the work because you dont get better without the effort.
     
  39. FastFreddy

    FastFreddy Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2008
    Messages:
    755
    PT

    I guess what I was trying to say is that PT guys and doctors get a bad rap if results from surgery are poor. I seen people missing PT then try and do more and makeup only to screw up their PT training. Just follow the right pace in PT too slow and then you would have stiffness and lack rom rom. Too fast and you can tear up the tendon you just fixed. Can't wait to start my PT in 4 weeks.
     
  40. Tofuspeedstar

    Tofuspeedstar Banned

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2007
    Messages:
    336
    Location:
    Houston,TX/Takamatsu City,Japan
    Man you guys are lucky, they had to completely cut open my right shoulder and repair a torn labrum =( 6pins.
     
  41. FastFreddy

    FastFreddy Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2008
    Messages:
    755
    Luck

    Just had my third shoulder surgery in 14 years lucky I am not. First two were open type where the Doctor cuts my shoulder muscle to get at my tendon which I teared off the bone 5cm x 4cm. I have a 5 inch scar on both shoulders. Last one was much better since it was a scope job which was cake compared to the first two. Anyone who has had any type of surgery is not lucky.
     
  42. larry10s

    larry10s Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2008
    Messages:
    3,976
    very true . every ortho i know says the same thing(more or less)
    my job is easy:) the rest is up to you
     
  43. GZim

    GZim Rookie

    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2009
    Messages:
    130
    Location:
    NY
    Today I went to the surgeon for a regular follow up, I am almost 16 weeks post op, and he said I could start hitting serves (and to GO SLOW) but to be sure for a proper warm up and to stretch out and ice after. I am really looking forward to playing some dubs ;)
    Last weekend I hit in a clinic and then the next day with another member and my shoulder feels pretty good.. a bit stiff on high balls, but it really felt so much more loose by the end of playing. I have been pretty careful not to over do it, and quiet often I let a high backhand just go by (I have a 1HBH).

    Freddy I hope you are doing well in your recovery, and that you Larry are feeling strong and doing your exercises to stay that way.

    Hope everyone is feeling good and staying healthy.

    Best,

    Gary
     
    Last edited: Jun 17, 2010
  44. larry10s

    larry10s Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2008
    Messages:
    3,976
    gary you must be a mind reader. i was going to post this morning for an update on yours and freddys progress. great to hear you are coming along. those sleepless nights must seem long ago:)
    freddy how are you doing???
    im doing well so far:)larry
     
  45. GZim

    GZim Rookie

    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2009
    Messages:
    130
    Location:
    NY
    Thanks Larry, sleep is back to where it was post surgery as I sleep on my right side, and it does hurt my shoulder.
    I played 2 sets of dubs this morning, and only hit second serves, and I cannot count how many I netted... but at least I was playing. It felt consistently tight, never really loosening up, but I also never pushed it. Other than serving (only held serve once) I played pretty well, and we won 8-6 and 6-4.

    Gary
     
  46. ttwarrior1

    ttwarrior1 Professional

    Joined:
    Apr 18, 2005
    Messages:
    1,145
    Location:
    kentucky
    try manganese, no not magesium, also super slow continuous tension shoulder and rotator cuff exerices. Raise and lower the weight slow with light weights. Also ice and glucosamine and glucosamine cream mixed with some type of mineral ice
     
  47. larry10s

    larry10s Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2008
    Messages:
    3,976
    forget what the orthos tell you. it will be 9-12 months before the serve feels right.:cry: but you won:)keep up the good work
     
  48. GZim

    GZim Rookie

    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2009
    Messages:
    130
    Location:
    NY
    Thanks, I have never taken maganese... curious, why? I will read up on it.
    I do my exercise almost everyday, yes slow and most with constant tension (resistance bands and small hand weights). Today I bought a chin up bar to hang from. The Ortho said I should hanging will be helpful, and especially to stretch after tennis.
     
  49. FastFreddy

    FastFreddy Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2008
    Messages:
    755
    What's up Gary and Larry 6 weeks out on Tuesday

    Doing great I am doing all my PT on my own finished my passive now doing active for the next six weeks. Next start my strength 12 weeks out. My insurance offered 30 pt appointments at 15.00 copay per app I said no thanks 450.00 in my pocket plus the time. I can do this myself since I already have 120 hrs PT under my belt.

    I only iced for the first 3 weeks 4 times a day 30 mins. Did not need one pain pill just like the first two times. Compare my scope job this time to the first two open jobs is like night and day. The open style they cut your shoulder muscle and I wore the dam sling for like 6 weeks really made my shoulder super stiff. I still need to wait 6-7 months for the tendon to heal fully then I will start playing tennis and start lifting heavier.
     
  50. GZim

    GZim Rookie

    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2009
    Messages:
    130
    Location:
    NY
    Today I played 3 sets of dubs, and was serving so much better than yesterday. Still only using second serves, but was able to hit the corners and move it around much better. Man, its really great being able to play again.

    Freddy, glad to hear you are having an easy recovery.


    Gary
     

Share This Page