Shoulder Issues -- Therapies, Surgeries, Etc.

Discussion in 'Health & Fitness' started by Spittle, Feb 3, 2008.

  1. OldButGame

    OldButGame Hall of Fame

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    (im askin YOU for tips next time i have issues !!!!!:))
     
  2. pdx_tennisplayer

    pdx_tennisplayer New User

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    Just had surgery yesterday on shoulder (torn RC+SAD). Doc said tendon was 80% torn. He did 2 anchors and said it went well. I am starting simple home passive ROM today.

    Thank you to everyone for sharing their experiences!

    John in Portland OR
     
  3. drak

    drak Professional

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    from a fellow Oregonian (Bend) best of luck! Had 2 anchors as well as RC was fully torn, came all the way back. Just do all the PT, don't push coming back to playing too soon.

    Drak
     
  4. FastFreddy

    FastFreddy Semi-Pro

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    Update

    Good news right shoulder feels great 15 months out of surgery. Now the left shoulder is acting up. My right shoulder's tendon ripped 11 years 8 months after the first open surgery. Now my left shoulder is 12 years 4 months after the open surgery and looks like the bone spurs have grown back and tearing the tendon again. I will wait until the new year and get a mri to see what is going on. I would say I will need a scope follow up surgery just like I had on the right one.
     
    Last edited: Aug 22, 2011
  5. Posture Guy

    Posture Guy Professional

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    FastFreddy.....We see people with your story all the time in our clinics. In almost all cases, the core problem isn't the condition of the shoulder, it's the POSITION of the shoulder. When a shoulder is out of position, the scapula (shoulder blade) can't glide freely as the arm tries to move. That will result in excessive friction and ultimately impingement. If you try to play through the impingement without fixing the positional problem, you'll damage the tissue in the shoulder.

    here's a test that demonstrates this phenomenon. Stand up nice and straight with your feet pigeon toed, thighs tight, stomach relaxed. Pinch your shoulder blades lightly together and hold them there, then lift your arms as directly out to the sides and then over your head as possible, as high as possible, then return them to your sides. See what that feels like.

    Now, stand with your feet in their normal position but assume a really lousy posture. Roll your upper back forward like you're really slouching, roll your shoulders forward, exaggerate a really bad postural position. Now do the same arm movement test. Don't let the arms go forward, make them go out to the sides directly in line with the shoulders.

    Feel the difference? That's a more dramatic illustration of the issue, but the principle is the same even in more subtle cases. A lot of us spend a lot of time sitting in cars, at desks, in front of computers, and our upper back and shoulders begin to round forward. We lose the ability to extend our thoracic (mid back) spine and our shoulder complexes round forward. Our scaps lose their glide potential and now we try to serve (which requires scapular rotation) and boom, shoulder problems.

    If the problem is bad enough surgery may well be indicated, but understand that surgery is NOT fixing the problem. It's fixing the result of the problem. The core problem, again, is not the condition of the shoulder, but rather that the shoulder (and indeed the rest of the body) has lost positional (postural) balance.

    Restore normal position and you'll restore normal function. If you have questions, feel free to IM me, happy to answer any questions you or anyone else might have.
     
  6. FastFreddy

    FastFreddy Semi-Pro

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    Nice Guess

    Just to fill you I ripped the tendon off the bone in hockey and it ripped 4x6cm from impact ie checking. My left shoulder ripped 2x2 cm slowly over time playing clay court tennis which is great for your knees but hitting balls above your shoulder will wreck any shoulder over time. I later found out from my Doctors the tendon does not have much room because of the shape of my bone type 3.
     
    Last edited: Aug 22, 2011
  7. Posture Guy

    Posture Guy Professional

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    yep, I read your posts. I don't think your tendons ripped because you were playing on clay. And variants in structure of shoulder joints are very common. Some may indeed increase the risk of such issues, but the number of cases where that's the true determining factor is very, very small.

    I run a clinic in Austin where I deal with people with pain or performance issues. In my clinical experience, I've never once seen a person who has torn tendons in their shoulder without either a significant trauma, or a fundamental positioning of the joint.

    and 90% of the people who walk in my clinic think their posture is fine, until we take their photos and start showing them where their posture is compared to where it's designed to be. Then they realize why they have a problem.

    I don't think you're broken, and I don't think you're doomed to ongoing and inevitable shoulder issues. If you disagree and you're content with your situation, that's fine. I figured you posted because you'd like to change your experience for the better. If you'd like to contact me directly and fire some questions at me offline, I'm happy to answer them (you can get my contact info via my profile). If you'd like to ignore my input, that's perfectly fine, too.

    I wish you and your shoulders well. Happy hitting.
     
  8. OldButGame

    OldButGame Hall of Fame

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    Posture Guy;

    I've been thru Phys Therapy post sgoulder surgery,...and came to learn much of exactly what You are talking about,..(posture, scapula, scapular stabilization, etc.)...Do You have any links to go deeper??....I've been having issues again much like the OP,...and roughly the same time period out from surgery,....but i havent fixed the posture issue yet,... :(
     
  9. Posture Guy

    Posture Guy Professional

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    First, to FastFreddy, obviously I offended or annoyed you in some respect, and for that I apologize. It was not my intent, nor was it to be presumptuous. My only intention is to be of service. Please treat my posts as one more dish at a buffet table. If it's not to your liking, feel free to pass on by. And if there's anything I can do to be of assistance, I'm happy to do so.

    OldButGame, love the moniker! PT is terrific for post-surgical remediation of the joint, restoring range of motion and strength, but the majority of PTs aren't working in an environment that allows them to really take the time to assess the body as a unit and see if there's something else going on that is impairing the ability of the shoulder in question to articulate properly. Simply put, the problem isn't always where the pain is.

    Here's an example: I had a client with severe shoulder pain, very active, played high school baseball at a high level and has a legit shot at a D1 scholarship and dreams of playing professionally. But he'd gotten to the point where his shoulder hurt so badly he couldn't throw without significant pain. MRIs and orthopedic examination determined the problem was "tendonitis" and he was sent to PT, which made his pain worse. Someone told him about me and he ends up in my office.

    this kid's problem wasn't his shoulder. His hip and pelvic girdle was so locked up because of the way he was strength training that it created two problems. First, the muscles that connect hips to shoulders were so tight that they were severely limiting the ability of the shoulder blades to glide freely. And as I said above, that is a surefire recipe for impingement if you put any athletic demand on your shoulder. The second problem was because he couldn't properly rotate through his core, his body couldn't create the power behind his throw from where it should come from, the legs, hips and core, the unwinding that creates the centrifugal force that allows us to throw a baseball or hit a serve with pace. So what did he do? What the rest of us would do in that situation: he started 'arming it', trying to increase arm velocity to make up for a lack of core rotation. Combine that with the scap mispositioning and it would've been a miracle if his shoulder DIDN'T hurt.

    We gave him exercises to remedy the issue with his hips and core, then worked on retraining the scaps how to glide properly, then when he was sufficiently out of pain, got him throwing again lightly and building up until he was able to throw at full effort with no pain. His summer league team just won the national championship two weeks ago, he's a happy camper.

    my message is pain isn't the problem. It's a message about a problem. Sometimes the problem is where the pain is, sometimes it isn't. Most people intuitively know that when they've hurt and simply treated symptom that the results were often less than satisfactory. This is why.

    To learn more? I need to walk a fine line here. I want to make VERY clear that I'm simply trying to provide some information and an alternative way of looking at some of these issues. I'm NOT trying to convince anyone to visit one of our clinics or any of that kind of stuff. So with that said, if you'd like to learn more, here are a few resources.

    first, you can start where I started with all of this. Get the book "Pain Free" by Pete Egoscue. Click on that link and read the reader reviews and you'll get the idea of the effectiveness of this approach. If you check out the 'most helpful' of the reviews, you'll find mine. I started as a client with Pete back in '99.

    Second, you can go to my profile that will give you a link to my web site where you can get my contact info. I won't post it here, but I'm happy to answer any questions you might have.

    the good news is, more and more professionals in this field are realizing the importance of postural integrity, and how it's a fundamental precursor to functional movement. There's a lot of people now who are out there doing some really good work. And there are also good resources you can use to give yourself some self-diagnostics and some self-help.

    best of luck, and again, feel free to shoot me an email if you have questions.
     
  10. ab70

    ab70 New User

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    I have not gone back to egoscue after recent surgery for failed SLAP repair (ended up with tenodesis this time) but prior surgery it was 50/50 in terms of effectiveness...

    Curious on what the professional opinion on how long one has to practice to see real benifits.

    Locally (san diego), it also extremely expensive ($150 per session) and not covered by insurance... looking backwards and going through PT for various body parts, it appears to me that a lot of egoscue excercises are fairly standard ones. the challenge with standard PTs is that they do not incorporate hip excercises in shoulder re-hab while there is indeed a benifit to look at it a bit more holistically.

    I ended up finding good DC who looks at things from general perspective and covered by insurance:)
     
  11. Posture Guy

    Posture Guy Professional

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    ab70....depends on the individual situation. If someone has a failed surgical repair, or has for example a partial thickness tear, and they're trying to avoid surgery, I won't make any promises. Sometimes surgery is simply the required next step. I was wrestling with my teenage son a couple of years ago and he landed on me with my arm at a very awkward angle and I knew I had a problem. I tried using my own stuff to ensure I didn't get surgery unless I really needed it, but as I suspected, this problem wasn't postural. It was just flat out torn. Ended up with a chunk of tendon ripped off the bone. Only way that's getting fixed is to surgically fix it.

    I've had clients, though, with partial thickness tears where it wasn't from an overt trauma, but rather, from using the shoulder repeatedly in a compromised position. In those cases, outcomes are usually pretty good.

    they key from an Egoscue perspective is determining the difference between dysfunction and compensation. What are the most fundamental issues with that person and how is the body trying to adapt around that. Those compensations take on a life of their own and the results aren't pretty. But the answer isn't to chase the compensations. It's to identify and remedy the core dysfunction.

    like the baseball player I mentioned above. I could've given him shoulder exercises all day long and he never would've gotten better and likely would've gotten worse.

    I tell folks that if you're trying to get a handle on where you're at posturally, just get Pain Free and read the first 3 chapters. If it doesn't make sense to you, put it down and look elsewhere for help and guidance. If it does make sense and you'd like some assistance in figuring out how to best deploy it for your situation, call the clinic nearest you, or call our clinic in Austin, and we'll give you free advice on how to get started with it. We do that all the time, never charge for it.

    We started as clients, we know what it's like to try to make things better when you're not sure where to start, so we're always happy to help as best we can.
     
  12. FastFreddy

    FastFreddy Semi-Pro

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    ok?

    I already know the about posture thur NASM training this is not a posture or muscle imbalance or core problem.
     
    Last edited: Aug 22, 2011
  13. Posture Guy

    Posture Guy Professional

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    FastFreddy....Pete doesn't run the clinic in Austin. I do. If you care to know who I am and "what I do for a living", I list my web site in my profile. Feel free to contact me directly and I'm happy to answer any of your questions.

    as I said, I wish you well, best of luck with your shoulders.
     
  14. FastFreddy

    FastFreddy Semi-Pro

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    free book and website plugs

    Good luck with your website, book plugs and your clinic but no thank you.
     
    Last edited: Aug 21, 2011
  15. Posture Guy

    Posture Guy Professional

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    FastFreddy, I've obviously offended you in some respect and have already apologized for doing so and will do so again. It was certainly not my intention.

    I'm not trying to 'plug' a web site or a book or my clinic. I'm assuming that most if not all the folks here don't live anywhere near me. If someone buys one of Pete's books, I don't make a penny. The only reason I even mentioned the book at all was someone specifically asked for a resource to dig further into this topic, and this book is a good place to start for the layman. The only reason I list my clinic info in my profile is so that if someone would like to email me a question, I'm happy to answer to the best of my ability, regardless of where they live.

    I have spent hundreds of hours giving people who will never set foot into my clinic free advice by phone or email simply because it's the right thing to do. When I came back to the game and this site, I debated about chiming in on any of these threads because I knew a few people would react as you have. But helping people in pain is a passion of mine. I've seen far too many people stuck in chronic pain who end up walking away from activities they love (like tennis, or running, or skiing) because of issues that are absolutely within their power to remedy without drugs, surgery or manipulation. I almost had to do that. Was told after a near fatal car wreck I would never be able to play tennis again. I've been blessed to have learned what I learned that has enabled me to not only be able to return to the game I love, but to help others return to what gives them joy, as well.

    I'm truly sorry I offended you. I don't know how else to say it, and I mean it sincerely. I'm NOT trying to 'drum up business', to think posting on an international message board is going to create business for my clinic in Austin would be pretty silly. But from time to time, if I see a thread where I think the person could benefit from my perspective, I'm going to share it. Hopefully, the next time I'll be able to do it with more grace than I did here, because I mean it when I say it that it's not my intention to offend or irritate, but to simply be of service.

    again, I wish you all the best and I hope your shoulders permit you to play this game pain free for many years to come.
     
  16. FastFreddy

    FastFreddy Semi-Pro

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    tbag

    Good luck with your franchise and getting back into tennis.
     
  17. Posture Guy

    Posture Guy Professional

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    thank you, sir. I forgot just how much I loved this game until I started playing again. Feels great to be back out sweating on the court.
     
  18. Boricua

    Boricua Hall of Fame

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    I have a slight discomfort in my right shoulder that gets a bit worse when I play tennis, specifically when hitting with a Aeroprodrive Gt racket. i also got my hand finger hurt a couple of months ago and dont know if the vibration of the APD when I mishit may disrupt the healing process. I am trying to soften the APD with Polyfibre TCS at 50 or a hybrid of TCS and Excel. I could even try full multi or gut. Nonetheless I dont know if any string alternative with this racket is a good idea when you have a shoulder ache, even if its minor like mine.

    I know that the best alternative is using a flexible rackete with a soft string.

    But:

    Will the APD work out with a very soft stringbed?

    Would a more arm friendly racket with a big sweet spot, (eventhough stiff) like the Yonex Ezone 100 be a better alternative?
     
  19. FastFreddy

    FastFreddy Semi-Pro

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    Well since the pain in my left shoulder is really annoying me I will see my Doctor asap to get my mri and have my surgery by Thanksgiving. I was going to wait but might as well take care of it and spend the 2k. So grand total will be 4k for 4 shoulder surgeries over 16 years. Plus I saved 3k doing my own PT.
     
    Last edited: Aug 26, 2011
  20. FastFreddy

    FastFreddy Semi-Pro

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    Quick update: just has shoulder surgery # 4, 2nd one on left shoulder. The Doctor removed 2 bone spurs and sewed my tendon back up. I hope this is the last surgery? PS: I had 2 wisdom teeth removed with just a local piece of cake! No pain meds just ice for these six opps.
     
  21. Posture Guy

    Posture Guy Professional

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    Was wondering if you'd had your surgery.

    Glad to hear it sounds to have gone well. Best wishes for a full and speedy recovery. Hope you're back on the court feeling great as quickly as possible.
     
  22. jonahnaturals

    jonahnaturals Rookie

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  23. FastFreddy

    FastFreddy Semi-Pro

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    Update left shoulder healing and feeling fine. Now my right shoulder which I had surgery on back in May 2010 is feeling not right. I will go in and have an mri and see what is going on in there. I might try another doctor who's surgery center is only 2 miles away from my house. My friend just had surgery from him and I will check him out before seeing my last doctor.
     
  24. charliefedererer

    charliefedererer Legend

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    FF: Thanks for the update. I'm glad your left shoulder is doing fine. It's too mad your right shoulder is giving you problems again.

    Are you still using BB in the mains?
    Are you right or left handed? (I thought it was left.)
    I assume you have a 2HBH. Yes?
    Are you still doing a heavy weight lifting routine?
     
    Last edited: May 17, 2012
  25. kobun

    kobun New User

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    jonahnaturals. Thanks for the extra rehab routine. I'm doing this in addition to thrower's 10. Giving it another month, been 4 months now. that's my limit and i see the doctor for MRI. I'm eager to get into 5.0 league before I get too old.
     
  26. FastFreddy

    FastFreddy Semi-Pro

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    update

    I bought those two Dunlops in Jan 2010 and have not broken the string that's how much I was played. I have a lefty forehand two hand back sitch is my forhand in hockey. I have a one handed slice on the backhand and a really good forehand slice since I played alot of squash. I serve first serves righty and 2nd serves lefty or I serve righty deuce side and lefty ad side it depend where the sun is. I still lift but pt only until the tendon heals 7 months I had a 4th surgery 4 months ago.

    Now my right shoulder is acting up and I had it done only 2 years ago. My left shoulder was hurting since the Jan this year got it fixed 4 moths ago now the right one is acting up. Need to get a mri once my left shoulder heals in 3 months then check out and see what happened. My frst two open surgeries lasted 12 years this scoped only lasted two years. I wonder if it was my fault since or the scope job which can tear in less than 5 years I did my own pt on this one and Iam doing pt on my newly fixed left shoulder. Could be worse and be my back or knees so I don't have much to complain about in my life.
     
  27. Pacific lefty

    Pacific lefty Rookie

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    Hey Fast Freddy, or anybody who has posted about their shoulder issues in the past. I am exactly 5 weeks post SAD and definitely haven't got back full ROM. This seems really slow to me, and I do have confidence in my PT. I can't believe Bronco was actually hitting after 19 days. My arm still feels sore, like a headache type of sore, and feels way to weak to hold a tennis racquet. Did you guys just do extra strengthening early? I was hoping to manage hitting next week, but highly doubt I'll reach that stage?
     
  28. FastFreddy

    FastFreddy Semi-Pro

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    Rom

    Dude their is no way u r going to have 100 percent full rom which is not really a big deal. Pt should be for 15 weeks and even then my Doc told me I lost 10 percent rom. I have to say my doc never checked before I ripped my shoulder if I ever had a full rom since I am ver stiff and don't have alot of flex. For me a pain free and strong shoulder and a little less rom is a nice tradeoff. My serve went from 105mph before sugery to 117mph after surgery.

    I was told by my Doc no hitting tennis balls until the tendon is fully healed which is 7 months. Once the tendon heals then u can start to really start buliding back your strength. It took me a full year after the first 7 months to slowly build my strength back up to normal. So u r really looking at almost 2 years. Pt is a very slow and up and down process and u need to do it at the right time and work level. I don't remember what Bronco had done but tendons need 7 months to heal. Maybe he just had his shoulder cleaned up and removed just bone spurs?
     
  29. pdx_tennisplayer

    pdx_tennisplayer New User

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    Yes, Bronco just had SAD surgery so he was back pretty quickly. I think surgery recovery is very individual based but I hope Pacific Lefty is starting to get some ROM back and will be back hitting balls soon!
     
  30. Say Chi Sin Lo

    Say Chi Sin Lo Legend

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    Hitting balls 3 weeks post-op is certainly doable, but it's not advised. Maybe I'm conservative, but I'll wait the extra month or two if I can play without limit for the rest of my life.

    100% ROM is hard to achieve because the surgery itself is damaging enough to form scar tissue. I have ~95% ROM and I'm not missing the remaining 5%. I can't slide my playing hand up my spine as high up as non-playing hand. I'm off by maybe an inch or two. I know, I'm dying inside. Oh the injustice!

    As far as extra strengthening goes. I did the prescribed routine by my PT. On most days, I did my routine twice a day (morning and night). There were days where I only did my routine once, and even then I didn't worry about my progress. I put as much emphasis in challenging myself and adequate rest.

    Now, several years removed from my 2nd surgery, I'm still working out my rotator cuff with a maintenance routine, 2-4x a week. Nowhere as intense as the rehab stuff, but easy going exercises just to keep my shoulder strong.

    As I have mentioned in your recovery thread, I'm playing with no limits. On days where I don't want to play, it's not because of my shoulder, it's because I'm tired from consecutive playing days.
     
  31. Pacific lefty

    Pacific lefty Rookie

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    Pin Cushion!

    Hey pdx tennis, I just had the decompression surgery, bursectomy, a/c clean out so I am now 6 weeks post op.

    I was in with my PT today and a bit disappointed but she didn't give me any green light whatsoever so start hitting. She did a bit of dry needling as apparently I have some really sore trigger points in the back of my shoulder. That was the second time she did that and every time it made the muscle twitch I shouted! Couldn't help it!

    Patience is hard! Especially watching the French open every day and not playing, but Say Chi you are right that I would rather wait and be able to play longer and with no pain recurring. I do feel like the movement is getting much better, I can really lift my arm well now.

    I am doing PT routine twice a day and need to work up to doing everything with the small weights before I can hit. That is what she said and I am to work on that for the next 2 weeks.
     
  32. FastFreddy

    FastFreddy Semi-Pro

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    Shoulder surgery rehab

    I was reading up on your surgery from your thread. our surgery was cake a scope job just to clean up and give more room to your tendon. Lucky u caught it early and had no tears like me. When did they say u can hit and be fully healed? Sounds like u will be healed right away. Did u have any bone supurs removed if so how many?
     
  33. Say Chi Sin Lo

    Say Chi Sin Lo Legend

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    My advise is: if you can't breeze through at least 1 set of 20reps external rotation with the highest resistant band, then the rotator cuff is not strong enough to withstand tennis.

    It's fine if you're in agony by the 3rd set of your external rotation exercises. But if you're agonizing through the 1st set, you're not ready.
     
  34. Pacific lefty

    Pacific lefty Rookie

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    Fastfreddy, I had the acromioplasty with the surgery which I guess is just the shaving away of some bone to make room for the tendon. Really glad I did it now and not later because I am certain the tendon would have sustained more damage.


    Say Chi, external rotation is pretty good and my goal for the next two weeks is to move up to the highest band in all exercises, then I think she will have me do light weights and I will be able to hit then.
     
  35. Hal

    Hal Rookie

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    Hey Folks, I just had surgery in my right shoulder last Tuesday (Aug 14). They did SAD, and removed a couple bone spurs. While they were in there they found a small tear in the rotator that wasn't on the MRI, and I think they fixed that, too. I don't see the doctor until next Monday but I'd like to see if you guys think I'm on track?

    I wasn't in much pain when the block wore off, so other then at night, I didn't use any of the pain medication (just taking Tylenol and Celebrex). They also told me to do passive pendulum exercises twice a day. I've been icing it, using a "Game Ready" device, as well.

    At one week (Aug 21), they said I could take the sling off, so I did. They also gave me another packet of exercises to start doing (they haven't assigned a PT person to me yet). These exercises included trying to lift the arm in front, side, and back (at the elbow). Each of these exercises is extremely painful. It's been a couple days and I'm able to lift in the front to about 50-60 degrees, the side, about 30 degrees, and the back barely at all (I don't think I could put something in my back pocket, for example). When I'm not doing the exercises, my arm feels pretty good (sometimes just a dull sensation).

    As I said, I don't see my doctor until next Monday, so I was hoping to get some feedback to see if the pain that I'm experiencing when doing my exercises is normal?

    Thanks!
     
  36. Posture Guy

    Posture Guy Professional

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    Hal......you should not, in my opinion, be doing ANY exercises on your own without first having done them under the supervision of a licensed physical therapist. I would request/demand a PT appointment immediately.

    Are you in the US or elsewhere?
     
  37. Hal

    Hal Rookie

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    Thanks for the advice. I'm in Minnesota. Most of the exercises I'm familiar with, since I did the PT routine before surgery. However, it's not clear to me what level of pain I should be experiencing right now while I'm doing them.
     
  38. Posture Guy

    Posture Guy Professional

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    It's not a question of whether or not you know how to do them. A quality PT should be assessing the intrinsic mobility of the joint, the position of the joint, and taking the joint through passive ROM under their manipulation to gauge restriction and movement capacity, then watching you do prescribed exercises to ensure not just that you're doing them correctly but that your shoulder is exhibiting a fundamentally sound movement pattern that is constructive and not destructive.

    Honestly, after a shoulder surgery, I think it's extremely irresponsible for a physician to have a patient begin rehab exercises without first having them evaluated by a physical therapist, and then having them do the exercises initially under direct supervision and evaluation.

    the answer to your question is impossible for any of us to answer because we don't know WHY you are having the pain you are having. Is it because you are experiencing normal post operative pain? Perhaps. Is it because the shoulder is not moving functionally and you are overstressing the repaired areas? Perhaps. Is it because you are doing an exercise your shoulder is not genuinely prepared to do at this time? Perhaps.

    Only one way to make that determination, and that's to utilize a physical therapist to evaluate and advise you.
     
  39. Hal

    Hal Rookie

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    Ok, Posture Guy, if you look through this thread you'll find plenty of knowledge being shared. I gave my type of surgery so I don't think it is too out of line for someone else that underwent a similar surgery to answer my query based on their experience.

    That said, to satisfy you, I'll change my question to: For those that had similar surgery to what I described, I would greatly appreciate it if you would share the level of pain that you experienced when you first started doing active ROM exercises?

    Thanks!
     
  40. Posture Guy

    Posture Guy Professional

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    Hal.....i understand what you're after. I just hope you understand that ANY answer you get here is going to be completely speculative and absolutely not grounded in what is happening with YOUR shoulder right now. I would just hate to see you doing something on your own that is going to either delay your recovery or damage the shoulder in some fashion.

    I wish you well and hope your recovery is fast and complete and you're back on the court soon.
     
  41. Hal

    Hal Rookie

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    If that is the case then we may as well delete this thread now. However, I think there is knowledge to be gained by sharing our experiences on this board. Some experiences may be relavent, some may not. It is up to the reader to determine what, if any, action should be done with that information. For example, your advice confirms my thoughts that I should request a PT when I see my surgeon next week.
     
  42. Pacific lefty

    Pacific lefty Rookie

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    Post SAD exercise-

    Hi Hal,
    I had SAD and bursectomy at the end of last April. (Just played friendly doubles last night- only 2 sets, and delighted to say my arm feels great!).

    I live in Ireland where tennis is a minority sport so I was very concerned that I would have to pick a good PT. My surgeon, who was excellent, was not at all in touch with what the "real" recovery time and return to tennis time would be.

    I kept a diary of my progress which my PT suggested and here are some of the tips:

    Firstly, I was only to do very gentle pendulum exercises and arm, neck movements for two weeks after the surgery. She would not increase the exercises till the third week. Even though there are some more "rapid recovery" programmes, she stressed the importance of tissue healing time. Even when I did receive the first two sets of more advanced stretching and strengthening I was only to do them once a day.

    Secondly, when doing the exercises given, most important thing, was to do them pain-free. You should feel some discomfort but not pain and especially not pain the day after. I was told not to move on to the next series of exercises until the first ones were achieved pain-free.

    The stiffness, which you obviously have to eliminate through stretching,sometimes takes time. And that is the third thing! TIME! I was so impatient, especially to achieve forward movement in my arm and movement behind my back. But I did notice, day by day, that it magically seemed to get better. This was another reason why my PT said to keep a diary, so that I could track progress and would realise that time is needed to recover. This is the last thing I am working on. I have all ROM and I can get my hand up behind my back although still about 2 inches lower than pre-surgery. So I am still working on it.

    All in all, really happy with progress. This forum has been very helpful to me as I don't know anybody near me who has had SAD.

    I wish you the best of luck! Give things time to heal and you will be back soon!
     
  43. Hal

    Hal Rookie

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    Pacific lefty,
    I was hoping you'd reply as I noticed that you had a similar procedure to mine. I forgot to mention that my surgeon also cleaned out the bursa as well.

    Since you kept a diary, I was wondering if you could tell me what your Range of Motion (ROM) was like when you first started your PT? Also, when you said you did your exercises pain-free, does that mean that you did not experience pain or that you backed off when started to notice pain. For example, when you're working on your ROM, did you lift your arm until you experienced pain and then stopped or???

    Thanks again!
     
  44. Pacific lefty

    Pacific lefty Rookie

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    Hi Hal,
    The first week post-surgery, when I did the pendulum exercises, the circles were only between 3 and 5 inches in diameter! As the first and second week progressed they got bigger and bigger. Post surgery ROM was not great! I really could not get my elbow out from my side, but for those 2 weeks was told to just work on pendulum and elbow and hand ROM. There was no question of trying to forcibly lift my arm out to the side or front.

    Advancing to 4 weeks post-surgery (1 week after meeting PT) I was able to get arm up in front to 90 degrees. I achieved this by slowly working on the stretching and strengthening exercises. Yes, once or twice I felt a little pain later in the day, and felt afraid that I had gone too far. The next day, I would ease off if it was still sore, or advance a little if it had settled and was not sore. Usually my PT would give me a set of exercises and on Monday they would be really hard to do and a little sore. I would keep going very carefully and by Friday they would be easy and I would be ready for the next set.

    By 5 weeks, external rotation ROM was nearly 100%. At 8 weeks, I was using stronger resistance bands, but had not yet achieved more than 90 degrees up.

    The hardest thing to get back was internal rotation, but as people on this forum, and my pt convinced me, this would come later with more stretching and work. I would say that now at approx 17 weeks it is at 95%.
     
  45. charliefedererer

    charliefedererer Legend

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    That is great! Glad to hear you are doing well.
     
  46. Pacific lefty

    Pacific lefty Rookie

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    Thanks CharlieF. I am delighted with my progress, and its going steadily really well. I will say for sure that TIME is so important and patience is needed for these procedures. Also, the quality and time spent on rehab. is a good investment. Finally, I learned most importantly what you were saying all along "Listen to your body" and "Don't play through the pain". I'm really glad I had the SAD done and I think am enjoying coming back slowly all the more...
     
  47. Hal

    Hal Rookie

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    Pacific lefty, thanks for your insight. I'm pretty sure I was pushing too much. I had no idea what to expect so I was trying to push past the pain (and it was pretty painful). I just hope I didn't reinjure anything. I can't wait to see the surgeon on Monday.
     
  48. Pacific lefty

    Pacific lefty Rookie

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    Best of luck Hal, hope it all goes well!
     
  49. Hal

    Hal Rookie

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    Thanks Pacific lefty! I saw the surgeon today and he said I was progressing normally. He told me to continue to do the ROM exercises for another week and then start with a PT next week. He showed me how to do one of the more painful exercises so that I don't experience any pain. He thought that I'm experiencing the pain because of the large bone spur that was removed. He thought I should be able to hit ground strokes in about a month. Serves would be a little while longer.
     
    Last edited: Aug 28, 2012
  50. FastFreddy

    FastFreddy Semi-Pro

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    Update

    I took some serves yesterday for the first time in 10 months since my 4th shoulder surgery. Got my lefty and righty serves working well and no pain or soreness during or the day after. I had a full rom plus when I decelerate I still had no pain and my arm took a natural path. So my service motion was not changed aleast from my point of view. I will have my gf shoot some video and compared it to presurgery to see if their is any difference?
    PS: got my free weight bench to 245 for 15 reps. First time benching with freeweights since before my first shoulder surgery back in 1996.
     

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