Shoulder Tendinitis, what can I do for recovery?

Discussion in 'Health & Fitness' started by c10, Nov 3, 2004.

  1. c10

    c10 Rookie

    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2004
    Messages:
    149
    I have a little shoulder tendinitis. What should I do in order to achieve a full recovery??
     
    #1
  2. Marius_Hancu

    Marius_Hancu G.O.A.T.

    Joined:
    Oct 29, 2004
    Messages:
    17,779
    Location:
    Montreal, Canada
    First, go and talk to an orthopedic surgeon (MD). An X-Ray and an MRI scan might be necessary to find the exact state of your problems.

    Then, for one thing learn and use the search tool at this site. Do a search with
    shoulder tendonitis
    and separately with
    shoulder pain
    Select: Search for all terms
    in this
    Health & Fitness section
    and you'll get articles such as this:
    http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/viewtopic.php?t=393&highlight=shoulder+tendonitis
    Read them all.
    Talk to the people replying there.

    Also, do a search at yahoo and google with the same keywords.

    Also, read all postings on TE (tennis elbow) in this section, the problem is quite similar in its treatment.

    In short:

    - stop any physical activity involving the joint until you absolutely have no pain (this could take up to 8 weeks)
    - start isometric and other flexibility exercises on the area; stop when any pain shows up
    - after 1-2 weeks of flexibility only, if no pain, start an weight program for the area, with gradually increasing weights (from 3 to say 25lbs); when having pain, decrease the load or stop; check my article here:
    http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/viewtopic.php?t=23127

    This could take you up to 4-6 months, if your shoulder is badly damaged. This is a great time to stop playing and start conditioning, with the winter coming.

    Have you neglected flexibility and weight exercises on that area?

    Also analyze your technique with a pro, perhaps you have hitches in your movement?

    Also, which racquet are you using, what's its weight?

    Also, which strings are you using, which tension?

    All this is discussed in the many articles on shoulder and TE listed at this site.
    Read them all, educate yourself. This is not laughing matter.
     
    #2
  3. NoBadMojo

    NoBadMojo G.O.A.T.

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2004
    Messages:
    11,915
    Location:
    Parts unknown
    non steroidal anti inflamatories (alleve not advil)..also ice immediatey after playing. good idea to isolate whatever it is that caused the tendonitis and correct that motion. if you cant figure this out on your own, would be a good idea to take a lesson from a good teaching pro. also best to use racquet and strings that arent too stiff or strung too tightly.
     
    #3
  4. precision response

    precision response New User

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2004
    Messages:
    74
    Take off a couple weeks/months until the inflamation is gone, then invest in a couple pairs of dumbbells and really (gradually) strengthen that Rotator Cuff! Google 'rotator cuff exercises' and you should be set.

    All the best with your recovery!
     
    #4
  5. precision response

    precision response New User

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2004
    Messages:
    74
    Take off a couple weeks/months until the inflamation is gone, then invest in a couple pairs of dumbbells and really (gradually) strengthen that Rotator Cuff! Google 'rotator cuff exercises' and you should be set.

    All the best with your recovery! :wink:
     
    #5
  6. vin

    vin Professional

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2004
    Messages:
    1,296
    I've suggested this a few times, but it doesn't seem like anyone is ever interested. Buy this book and try it out: http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/A...03/sr=2-1/ref=pd_ka_b_2_1/103-7001441-1418202

    It may not be tendonitis that you have. It's worth trying this before you get pushed around between doctors and physical therapists only to spend months and months away from tennis without resolving the problem.

    Once you get through this problem, make sure you get into stretching and strengthening (at least rotator cuff strengthening). This is important in addition to correcting your serve. (You're the same guy that posted this in the tips section, right?)
     
    #6
  7. ronwest

    ronwest New User

    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2004
    Messages:
    5
    I definitely agree with Vin. I had shoulder problems diagnosed as tendonitis for about 3 years. I went through physical therapy and it just came back when I started playing again. I thought it had to be caused by a flaw in my serve. Then I found the Trigger Point book in Vin's post. The problems are gone now.
     
    #7
  8. vin

    vin Professional

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2004
    Messages:
    1,296
    AWESOME! It's amazing that such a nagging and painful problem can be resolved so easily, isn't it?

    I'm happy someone finally benefited from me suggesting this book. Maybe others will try it now. Trigger points are not always the problem, but they often are and learning about them and checking for them as a first step is certainly cheaper, quicker, and easier than all the rounds with doctors. A no brainer in my opinion.

    Congratulations on fixing your shoulder. :)
     
    #8
  9. Marius_Hancu

    Marius_Hancu G.O.A.T.

    Joined:
    Oct 29, 2004
    Messages:
    17,779
    Location:
    Montreal, Canada
    Did you apply yourself the treatment or did you convince a therapist to do it?
     
    #9
  10. vin

    vin Professional

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2004
    Messages:
    1,296
    It's actually better to do it yourself. Trigger points are found easier yourself because of the pain they cause when pressed on. Someone else will have trouble finding them by feel.

    Besides, massages are usually ~ $60/hr and doing it yourself is free! In addition, if a trigger point is at the stage of causing you pain, it will take a couple of times a day for a few days to get rid of it. Going to a massage therapist for that is not practicle.

    I think the best way to do it is to use trigger point therapy yourself when you need to and have a deep tissue massage every couple of months or so for maintenance. Pros seem to have them almost every time they play.
     
    #10
  11. drake

    drake Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2004
    Messages:
    574
    Vin-

    Do you think the Trigger Point book will help for tennis elbow?
     
    #11
  12. vin

    vin Professional

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2004
    Messages:
    1,296
    If it really is tendonitis that you have, then no, it won't help. But the chances are high that that it's not tendonitis and just some muscle knots. Tennis elbow, according to the book, is one of the most often misdiagnosed conditions in relation to trigger points.

    Most people deal with tennis elbow for months, if not longer. The book costs less than $20, will take you a few hours to read, and a few days to look for trigger points in your arm and get rid of them. What I'm saying is that it's not a big risk to go ahead and try it out.
     
    #12
  13. Matt Choi

    Matt Choi New User

    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2004
    Messages:
    52
    I think this is a miracle therapy. I manage to find this trigger point around my shoulder blade area and massaged it til I was sweating from the pain. And, now I can actually lift my arm above my shoulder without any pain and this is only after 1 session. Unbelievable.
     
    #13
  14. vin

    vin Professional

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2004
    Messages:
    1,296
    Good to hear! Are you using a tennis ball against the wall or did you get a thera-cane?

    Now that I know where most of my problem areas are, I look for and get rid of the trigger points before they cause pain. My trapezius and and the muscles between the spine and scapula on my right side are the worst offenders. Stretching my arm in front of my chest and going up and down with a ball between this area on my back and the wall works great.

    Teres minor or maybe major (part of the rotator cuff right behind the armpit) is another culprit that I usually have to do maintenance on.

    Trigger points are often caused from repetitive activity which means that any you get from tennis are likely to come back eventually.
     
    #14
  15. Matt Choi

    Matt Choi New User

    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2004
    Messages:
    52
    I use a tennis ball. Is thera-cane much more effective?
    Anyway, I did another 30 minute massage this morning, and I actually have a full range of motion in my right shoulder. This was impossible for the last 3 years,but it's gone overnight. LOL. It's a good thing I ran into this thread....

    Thanks Vin for this important information.
     
    #15
  16. vin

    vin Professional

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2004
    Messages:
    1,296
    It depends on the spot you're working on. I got one for my trapezius because the tennis ball against the wall doesn't work well in that area. I think the author suggests the tennis ball as the best method for most areas.
    No problem, I'm glad the information was helpful to you.

    Enjoy your increased range of motion. :)
     
    #16
  17. Eric Matuszewski

    Eric Matuszewski Rookie

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2004
    Messages:
    179
    I've had a thera-cane for 2 years now and found it because of the same book. I tried to get rid of a point in my levator, but it's a very difficult location to do by yourself with or without the thera-cane. I've also tried all sizes and hardnesses of balls ie, tennis, golf, baseball.

    My own fingers still work better for this application.

    Try to find one of those places that do 10 minute "chair" type massages near you if money is an issue. These have been my best investment in saving my body.

    There really is no substitute for the work of a well trained massage therapist/accupressurist. Someone else can get much better force on your harder to reach areas. The cane was a good try, but it can't come close to another persons skilled hands.
     
    #17
  18. vin

    vin Professional

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2004
    Messages:
    1,296
    I use my fingers too, but the theracane works pretty good a bit further down.
    I agree. Regular massages should be part of every serious tennis players fitness program. However, I think this trigger point therapy stuff is great for aches and pains or just plain maintainance in between massages.
     
    #18

Share This Page