Silent Partner Crump or Mutual Power Alpine 6600

Discussion in 'Stringing Techniques / Stringing Machines' started by The Jedi, May 4, 2008.

  1. The Jedi

    The Jedi New User

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    I have been reading a LOT of the threads here, and I am trying to educate myself before jumping in to buy my first stringing machine.
    I would like to thank ALL of you for your inputs - very helpful.

    Reading about the drop weight machines and the extra time it takes to string, I am sure that I would like to get a "crank" machine. As my wife says: "you will not use it. For a few dollars, you will just take it to the pro shop". She is right.

    Since I've been reading so much "trash" about Eagnas, I just stop researching their web site. My heart was set on the Revo 4000, but as you know, they are not getting any machines for a while, so I narrowed it down to: SP Crump ($499), and MP Alpine 6600 ($529).

    As you can see, My budget is around $500 (+ shipping). Between my son and I, we will robably use the machine 3 times a month, and maybe more if he would like to make some extra cash, stringing for his friends.

    Any input on those 2 machine will be greatly appreciated. Thanks.
     
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  2. theace21

    theace21 Hall of Fame

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    This was the first I heard of the SP Crump. Maybe I missed something, hopefully someone will post a review soon.

    Alpine 6600 uses glide bars. I have a glide bar machine and it is fast, but if I was to purchase another machine I would not be a glide bar machine. If you ever have to string a fan pattern racket you are going to have to purchase floating clamps.

    Revo are out of stock for a reason. I would wait and go with a known winner. If you can't wait, try the SP Crump. Just verify their return policy. SP seems to treat their customers right from what I have read...Good Luck...
     
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  3. The Jedi

    The Jedi New User

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    Thanks for your response. The Silent Partner Crump is new. Here's a link: http://www.sptennis.com/stringer.asp#CRUMP

    It sound pretty good "on paper".

    My goal for the machine I buy, is to be easy and fast stringing (on the $500 budget).

    I will be back to this form in about an hour. Thanks.
     
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  4. !Tym

    !Tym Hall of Fame

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    In my opinion, no you won't. Stringing really isn't that hard, not even with the lowliest of dropweights. Get a ********* Eco model if you can, it'll be super easy to use and produce true, professional constant-pull results.

    I wouldn't get a crank machine these days unless you're planning to add a Wise later.

    My advice is to splurge just a little bit more and get a ********* ML100 (even if it means cutting down on the Starbucks runs or whatever), because with a stringing machine you really do get what you pay for AND it's very common for people to get buyer's remorse, or rather, buyer's lust after you've already made the investment. Meaning, most stringers start out small, then they inevitably find that strinigng is like knitting for guys, then they lust over better more expensive machines for no particular reason, then next thing you know, they're hounding their wives, and trying to convince them why they MUST have this machine or the world will just die, just DIE I TELL YOU!

    Finally, when everyone around you gets fed up, you'll just go and charge it to your credit card behind your backs anyway, and sniffle to yourself, well nobody understands me anyway.

    This said, there are certain real performance compromises in machines costing less than $500 for the most part. Get an Eco or ML100, however, and you're not really making any performance sacrifices, they can string up to a professional standard, true constant-pull, have excellent clamps and in my opinion, the best and safest mounting system design on the market.

    They're the kind of machine where while you COULD upgrade, you really don't have to. With a crank machine or lower end dropweight machine, that's not the case.

    This said, if you're only stringing just three times a month or so and NEVER plan on stringing for others (which is pretty hard not to do once you get into it, you'll then start seeing dollar signs on all of your tennis playing buds heads and start thinking ok Terry should be good for three Starbucks frappuchinos, Alex for kitty the purtty kat's new toy, and so on and so forth)...well, then, there is NOTHING wrong with one of the upper echelon dropweights that can be had for around $300-500 or so.

    I'm talking one other words about the ones with ratched tensioners. They're not hard to use, just slightly cumbersome. They produce fantastic results though, true constant-pull. As I said, if you're only stringing three times a month you won't even think about it.

    The clamps and mounting on these machines tend to be quite good and the same as used on their higher priced crank machines, the only difference is the less convenient tensioner.

    Don't be scared though, seriously, I started with an ATS Super Stringer before, and the original Silent Partner E-Stringer. Even with the lowliest of the low I never had ANY desire to ever go back to a shop and pay them to string my rackets (that I was breaking strings every 45 minutes to an hour or so back then though may have had something to do with it).
     
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  5. The Jedi

    The Jedi New User

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    Thanks !TYM, You are so right. I keep upgrading my guitars almost every 3-6 months. However, stringing racquets is not something that I am going to do every day (like playing the guitars), so I don't want to spend more than the $500 budget.

    Are the SP or MP machines good enough for what I'm looking for?

    Thanks again for your response.
     
    #5
  6. !Tym

    !Tym Hall of Fame

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    Honeslty, I would say go for the ********* Eco, but it seems as though it may have been discontinued as I don't see it for sale anymore.

    Since you don't want to spend more than $500, what I would recommend getting a fixed clamp dropweight machine over the Crump, and then buying my ********* ML100 dropweight off of me for $150 shipped, and then drilling a hole and bolting that onto the hip-hop or whatever in place of the dropweight that comes with it.

    I'm considering putting a Wise 2086 on my *********, just because, and if I do so I would want to get rid of my ML100 tensioning mechanism. Nothing wrong with it per say, but I want the Wise 2086 now and have to justify it to myself since really if I think logically there really isn't much of a justification.

    The clamps on the Hip-Hop concern me, they're cone-lock. I've never tried that kind, but apparently you have to tie down the base, vs. the spring-assisted ones which are more of a quick clicking action into place. I don't know how long it takes or how long it takes to tie down the bases on the cone-lock variety.

    The Alpha dropweight fixed clamp model at $399 seems like a better deal to me as you get the spring-assisted bases. This said, you do get the less convenient mounting. With the Hip-Hop you can adjust both side arms with a single knob which is a step-up in convenience in my opinion, they're called "self-centering" style arms.

    The Gamma models by comparison don't make sense, too overpriced comared to the Hip-Hop and Alpha's for comparable performance.

    As far as cranks go, like I said, I know a lot of people still like them because of their convenience, but to me, they constant-pull is just plain better.

    If you go the crank route, I DEFINITELY would be looking to add a Wise as soon as possible, because to me cranks just don't produce the kind of string jobs I'm used to now that I've come to expect constant-pull string beds (better tension maintenance, tighter string beds overall, more consistent in my opinion).

    I'd rather the greater hassle and inconvenience of a ratched dropweight (and occasionally blisters if you string too many in a row, from the constant ratcheting) to a crank machine given how little you plan on stringing.
     
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  7. josef

    josef Rookie

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    good info! i'm in the OP's situation too and am looking for my first stringer..
     
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