Singles vs. Doubles raquet

Discussion in 'Tennis Tips/Instruction' started by Ptomin, Aug 27, 2010.

  1. Ptomin

    Ptomin New User

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    Just curious, does anybody out there switch racquets from singles to doubles? I've found myself over the past few months using a different racquet when I play doubles. I'm sure this isn't a good idea but I can't argue with the results I'm getting. Winning more doubles matches lately then I did when I used my "singles" racquet.

    Cheers
     
    #1
  2. SystemicAnomaly

    SystemicAnomaly G.O.A.T.

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    If you've developed your muscle memory for both racquet types, then you are probably ok. Swingweight differences take a bit to master, but I don't have too much trouble doing so unless the diff is huge.

    Don't play much singles these days but every once in a while I'll hit with some version of a Wilson 6.1 stick. Feels nice and solid when hitting from the baseline but I cannot use it for doubs -- need something a bit more maneuverable at the net.
     
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  3. jjs891

    jjs891 Semi-Pro

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    I've been playing with Vantage 95" for a while. I have both 70 and 63 RA's with otherwise identical specs. I prefer to play doubles with 70RA one since my serves and volleys are better with more pop. But my ground strokes are much better and consistent with 63RA. So you're not alone in feeling the way you do, although in my case it's not a huge adjustment each time.
     
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  4. lonux

    lonux Hall of Fame

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    I hit with a Dunlop Aerogel 300 16x18 for singles - I usually play singles. Once every while, I switch to an old Pro Supex Millennium Tour (95 sq in head) because it is much better at the net. For doubles of course.
     
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  5. Ptomin

    Ptomin New User

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    Ok...well I'm glad I'm not the only one...For singles I use my trusty ole' aeropro drive...but for dbls I'm having success with the Dunlop 4D 500...It feels a little quicker at the net then the aeropro. It’s all working for me as of now so I guess I’ll keep doing it until the tennis gods catch me.
     
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  6. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    Learn to volley.
    If you think a lighter racket truly is quicker at the net.
    Almost every good volleyer ever used heavy, small headed, head light rackets.
    Those big headed, lighter weight, head heavier balanced rackets are made for baseline play from stunted swingers.
     
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  7. papa

    papa Hall of Fame

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    I don't care than much for the larger headed racquets like those made by Weed (125 -135 sq in -- very close to the legal upper limit) or some of the larger Wilson or Prince racquets that are close to 120 sq in or maybe more. Have I seen players use them effectively in high level tennis - you bet but they aren't for me.

    Some say eyesight is the reason but I'm not convinced - at least not yet. Maybe someday.

    I have played with a couple of the new Wilson racquets which are over 110 sq inches and found that they are fairly stable but I find them too powerful - feel like I could hit the ball about a mile or two with them. Now, one of the other factors to consider in larger racquets is that many who use them, string them extremely loose - a know of players that have them strung at 30 - 35 pounds so the ball just zooms off them without much effort.

    Anyway, if you can handle the larger sizes and can control the power, then why not.
     
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  8. fuzz nation

    fuzz nation Legend

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    That sounds like the dream scenario in terms of having similar racquets for both settings. I still love using my old ProStaff 6.1 Classics for doubles (70-72 RA?), mostly due to their command around the net. Plenty of pop and stability, but that's not as helpful for me in a singles match where I want to be more consistent.

    The Volkl C10 (63 RA) is my softer alternative to the 6.1's and I can use them much more effectively from the baseline. Balances with these frames are similar and the Volkl is a very nice all-court performer for me, but since it's a good deal more flexible, the C10 doesn't quite match the superlative zip, control, and touch that I want on my volleys.

    Ptomin: sounds like you're on to a good thing with the different racquets, so don't be so sure that it's a bad idea. I think it makes plenty of sense as long as it doesn't make a mess of your game.
     
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  9. Ptomin

    Ptomin New User

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    "Ptomin: sounds like you're on to a good thing with the different racquets, so don't be so sure that it's a bad idea. I think it makes plenty of sense as long as it doesn't make a mess of your game."

    It wasn't a planned thing or anything, One tourny I ended up having to play a singles match, then 15 minuets later a dbls match. The singles match was a gruling, long match on a hot New Mexico afternoon. Just out of shear exhaustion I grabbed the lightest racquet in my bag...Dunlop 4D 500...I played what may have been my best doubles match ever...So I have kept doing it....I'm sure the "real" players out there think this is a bad idea...But...It works for me.
     
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  10. LuckyR

    LuckyR Legend

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    Good luck with that. If you play each 50% of the time, my guess is you will never settle into a rhythm. BTW light sticks are often touted as doubles racquets because they are more maneuverable at the net. What they don't tell you is they are less stable on offcenter volleys. I use a heavy SW stick and have not trouble getting to well struck balls at the net.
     
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  11. user92626

    user92626 Legend

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    In 3 years of tennis I've bought for myself 4 rackets, and 2 weeks ago I realized that ...all the rackets I have hit ..the same!!! It just took me a few hitting sessions to recognize the weight, feel the sweetspot and sound, and off I go.


    I don't know why folks make a big deal about racket, unless it's something very extreme.
     
    #11
  12. larry10s

    larry10s Hall of Fame

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    once you accept that the reason for misses .less/more spin .balls going short/long ,etc.
    is YOU:shock:
    you no longer obsess over the racquet
    jmho
     
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  13. 5263

    5263 G.O.A.T.

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    I generally use the Head Instinct for dubs,
    but often opt for the Head Prestige for singles.
    Both have the same 102 head size,
    but the instinct gives a little more power with the shorter dubs strokes
    and the heavier Prestige with a tighter string pattern gives me the finer control I like with the bigger cuts I can take given the extra time in singles.

    Oddly I find I play better with the instinct after playing with the prestige some, so often I will warm up and even start the match with the prestige,
    then in dubs, switch to the instinct.
    I think of the Prestige like my "stroke trainer".
    I can also go to the Instinct if I start getting tired in a singles match.
     
    Last edited: Aug 31, 2010
    #13
  14. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    I'm pretty sure, if'n you switched to RogerFederer's racket, you will play just like him and be #2 in the world.
    So maybe you should switch to BobBryan's racket for your doubles matches.
    Or maybe ........
     
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  15. jjs891

    jjs891 Semi-Pro

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    LeeD, Didn't I read in one of your posts that you switch between Dunlop 200 and 200 Tour from time to time dependent on how you feel?
     
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  16. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    Nope, as usual, you read wrong.
    I have 2 Mfil 200's that say "tour specifications" on the top of the head.
    I have one Aero 200 that says "tour specifications" on the head.
    I switched between those 3, and mix in a HeadLM 95, another Head, and my 3 matched Prince 115's, depending on what I feel like using.
     
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  17. jjs891

    jjs891 Semi-Pro

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    Is that 115 the headsize on Prince? That would be quite a range in specs on your sticks. I don't know how you do it. Anyway I stand corrected regarding your Dunlops.
     
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  18. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    Big headed sticks, you compensate on serves by knowing flat serve don't work, but hard spin serves are slightly enhanced.
    Groundies, you don't need to watch the ball, but if you want to hit sharp and accurate, you cannot do so as well as 95's.
    Volleys, you can put away sitters, but low and half volleys are very difficult.
    Full stroke returns of serves, you can contact more often, but risk hitting long more often.
    Block returns are easier.
    1hbh's are tougher to hit accurately, but 2hbh's seem easier.
    Forehands are spinnier, but flat putaways are harder to control depth.
    My tennis shoes are mobile, but my steel toed work boots protect from dropped heavy objects.
     
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