Slow motion narrated analysis

Discussion in 'Tennis Tips/Instruction' started by BeachTennis, Aug 27, 2006.

  1. BeachTennis

    BeachTennis Semi-Pro

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    A personalized training tape is a slow motion narrated analysis of the essential strokes and an on-court review to summarize the specific recommendations made during the critique. The diagnostic evealuation is based on sound logic and proven scientific principles. The service clearly explains and demonstrates an accelerated process for you to, simply, "get
    better."
    Part One Full Speed
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TD4rpAv0qYk

    Part Two Full Speed
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5xJDmQRv1kY

    Part Three Slow Motion
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wZAnKZDpb4c

    "I can tell you the success we have had with players ... and that there is absolutely no way we could have had any of that success if I were not fortunate enough to be taught how to teach tennis by Steve Smith"

    Craig Tiley Univ. Illinois, NCAA Coach of the Year. ...
     
    #1
  2. ubel

    ubel Professional

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    This is just the first part right? It's a nice introduction and helps establish some credibility, but I'd like to see some ACTUAL stroke analysis :p
     
    #2
  3. BeachTennis

    BeachTennis Semi-Pro

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    Thanks

    More coming soon!
     
    #3
  4. D-man

    D-man Banned

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    thanks for your vids, beach
     
    #4
  5. AndyFitzell

    AndyFitzell New User

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    Money well spent

    I know Steve and share a common mentor with him. I have been to his camp in Tampa, FL and have seen first hand what a great program he runs and what he is able to do with players. You won’t be disappointed as long as you make the changes he suggests.
     
    #5
  6. BeachTennis

    BeachTennis Semi-Pro

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    Nice to see someone knows Steve

    [​IMG]

    Who is the mentor that you have in common with steve?

    Could it be Vic?
     
    #6
  7. TylerWeekes

    TylerWeekes New User

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    I was with AndyFitzell when I met Steve Smith. I share a common mentor with Steve and Andy.

    And yes it is Vic Braden. Some unbelievable results have been produced by the Vic Braden trained pro Steve Smith and his protégé Craig Tiley.

    It goes to show that fundamentals will never die!


    -Tyler:D
     
    #7
  8. 95nCode95

    95nCode95 Rookie

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    wow those are some really ugly strokes, it's way tooooooo old school man. if you play like that in tournaments, there's no way youll do good. with the new generation of players using extra top spin, stepping in that much you'll get jammed alot. but thats my opinion
     
    #8
  9. TylerWeekes

    TylerWeekes New User

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    If you knew how many players have been produced using fundamental strokes as seen in these videos, you would not have made those comments. Steve Smith whom you heard in the background has taught several touring pros in the mold you witnessed on the video as well as trained Craig Tiley as a coach. One of the most successful American College coaches we have had in a long time. Such players as Rajeev Ram and Amer Delic were on his team and were top 150 in the world players. Oh and square stance as well as open stance and square stance are both a necessity in today's game.

    Just FYI.:D


    -Tyler
     
    #9
  10. BeachTennis

    BeachTennis Semi-Pro

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    starting to play at 18 years old

    Finding the Right School After starting to play at 18 years old
    Renée ignored the criticism and instead turned to her family and long-standing influences, Popovic, Morelli and Lamarche, for the support to reach her goals. She applied to colleges, and was thrilled to receive a scholarship to attend California University of Pennsylvania, a Division II school.

    Shortly after her freshman year began, Renée knew almost immediately that the tennis team wasn’t right for her. “I was going in there with high hopes—to be a No. 1 player and possibly go pro,” she said. “But I didn’t feel like we were training hard enough as a team. I thought by staying there, I wouldn't get to where I wanted to be as a tennis player.”

    Renée was also having trouble with her college classes. “I was kind of rusty on my academics because I took a year off before college, and it was hard for me to get back into the swing of things,” she said. Her coach, Pablo Montana, knew she wasn’t happy at CUP, and suggested she transfer to a community college in Florida, where Division I schools often look when recruiting players.

    Taking his advice to heart, she transferred to Hillsborough Community College in Tampa Fla., under the coaching of Steve Smith. “I saw he was a hard working, dedicated coach, and the school also has really great facilities,” she said. Renée was exposed to top notch players and was able to further develop her game.

    After steadily working at her grades and tennis game for a year, Renée transferred again, this time to Robert Morris University in Pennsylvania, where she received a tennis scholarship to attend the Division I school.

    Now a junior at RMU, Renée is captain of the tennis team, as well as the No. 1 singles and No. 1 doubles player. Her coach, Evan Schermer, just informed her that she’ll be the recipient of the team’s MVP award for the year.
     
    #10
  11. TylerWeekes

    TylerWeekes New User

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    That is a great story! I spent 3 hours with Steve and got to hear all sorts of great stories just like this one. Like I have said before, you must be careful when you here about people talking about “the modern game”, especially when coaches say those words. As Steve said in the background, there is no right way or wrong way to hit a ball, only efficient or inefficient. Some try to repackage old concepts and sell them as “the modern game”. Fundamentals, though, are what produce players, and in my opinion, Steve Smith is one of the Masters at teaching fundamentals.

    -Tyler:D
     
    #11

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