Small, heavy racquet better for beginners.

Discussion in 'Racquets' started by TennisTrainee, Mar 25, 2008.

  1. TennisTrainee

    TennisTrainee New User

    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2008
    Messages:
    55
    I heard that starting with a small racket size and heavy racquet will make you improve faster, so I'm planning on getting a 95sq inch racquet, over 11 oz.

    Any opinions or recommendations on this?
     
    #1
  2. hewittfan3

    hewittfan3 Rookie

    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2008
    Messages:
    345
    Location:
    Minnesota
    The Yonex RQ iS Tour 1 is 95 sq. in. and over 11 oz. I'm not sure I would consider it a beginners racquet but you could always demo it
     
    #2
  3. morten

    morten Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2004
    Messages:
    3,352
    go for it, 95 is not small, 11 oz is not heavy IMO..
     
    #3
  4. Bud

    Bud Bionic Poster

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2007
    Messages:
    31,170
    Location:
    San Diego, CA
    Sounds good!

    Try a HEAD LM Radical mid+. It's the perfect racquet for a beginner (and it will grow with your game). It's also inexpensive so you can get a couple without breaking the bank.

    It states the head size is 97-98 sq. in. but it's actually 95 sq. in. if measured to the inside of the head (rather than the outside).
     
    #4
  5. JRstriker12

    JRstriker12 Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2006
    Messages:
    3,374
    A small, heavy racket won't necessarily "make" you a better player. Don't depend on the racket to make you a better player.

    Play with what ever feels comfortable for you. Demo different rackets of different sizes and weights. Who knows, maybe you'll like something with a 90inch head or "GASP!!!" maybe you'll find a moderate weight, mid-plus that you like a lot.
     
    #5
  6. Doc Hollidae

    Doc Hollidae Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2006
    Messages:
    1,719
    Whoever told you this gave you bad advice.

    In regards to equipment, tennis is a game of preference. Junk to one player, is the "one" for another player. There's plenty of advanced players that play with larger racket heads and sub-12 oz. rackets and there's plenty of beginners wielding heavy rackets with smaller racket head sizes. It all depends on what the player prefers and feels. No specific specifications are going to make a player improve faster, because if you're consistently mishitting balls with a smaller, heavier frame you're going to have a hard time improving and/or enjoying the game of tennis. I've seen plenty of players playing with rackets that are too demanding and it stunts their improvement.

    I'd read through JollyRoger's racket selection guy for some reference if you're a beginner. He's got some good advice in there. Bud's suggestion of the LM Radical MP is a good racket for beginners looking to take on tennis seriously. The MFil 300 is in the same boat. However, each player has their personal preference, so the best thing to do is demo for at least a good 2-3 weeks and try as many rackets as you can.
     
    #6
  7. superstition

    superstition Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Sep 20, 2006
    Messages:
    3,035
    One of the common mistakes beginners make is getting a giant headed, stiff, head-heavy, and feather weight racquet. They end up with injured wrists, sore elbows, and frustration from racquet instability and lack of control.

    A player can do a lot worse than a small-headed heavy racquet. However, at the extremes, such a racquet can be a hindrance. I saw a player who used a Prostaff 85 and the racquet clearly was too much for him. He hit the frame more often than the other players. I didn't have that issue, although the one problem I had with it was fatigue due to the weight. As I continued to play with it my arm muscles got stronger which helped.
     
    #7
  8. TennisTrainee

    TennisTrainee New User

    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2008
    Messages:
    55
    The idea was a heavier racquet will train the muscles faster, and a smaller racquet (with a smaller sweetspot) would FORCE you to use proper technique, or your balls would go everywhere. Having explained the idea behind it, do you still believe it's bad advice?

    Please note I never said it will make me a better player. That's just crazy talk!
     
    #8
  9. Salsa_Lover

    Salsa_Lover Rookie

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2007
    Messages:
    279
    Location:
    Zürich, Switzerland
    My opinion is that it depends on your personality.

    I learned to play with an small and heavy racket ( 90 sq in, 12oz ). In the long run it is better, because it forces you to learn to hit with right technique.

    You need to anticipate, place yourself better, get the grip right, have a long and fast swing. Otherwise it doesn't work. Add to that that I only learned the 1HBH, I never hit a 2HBH yet.

    The learning courve will be step and slow. But when you eventually got it, you got it right.

    Now, if you are the kind that gets frustated and give up fast, then this will not be the easy way. In that case you could get a big and light racket and have the ball in motion faster, but not necesarily with the right technique, with the hope to improve your technique gradually and then could upgrade to more demanding rackets.
     
    #9
  10. TennisTrainee

    TennisTrainee New User

    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2008
    Messages:
    55
    I'm the kind of guy that is willing to take the hardest, least immediately rewarding path so he can get the greatest reward in the end.
     
    #10
  11. Salsa_Lover

    Salsa_Lover Rookie

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2007
    Messages:
    279
    Location:
    Zürich, Switzerland
    Then go for it ! Just have it clear that it will not be easy or fast.

    Try a 90 too, maybe it could be the one for you ;)
     
    #11
  12. JRstriker12

    JRstriker12 Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2006
    Messages:
    3,374
    You said:

    If you "improve faster" doesn't that mean you will become a better player? So basically you think that a heavier, smaller racket will make you a better player faster - right??? I'm saying don't buy a particular "type" of racket to help you improve faster - buy a racket that you are comfortable with and works for you. Demo, Demo, Demo....

    It's not the best advice. As I said before - I would not buy a racket with the expectation that any particular racket size or weight would make you a better player faster.

    If you are new to the game, having a heavy racket with a high swing weight can force you to use bad form to get it around and hit with it.

    Also a smaller sweet spot can make it exceeding difficult to play and it's hard to develop good strokes if you end up framing the ball all day long and you end up frustrated. You can also develop good strokes with a lighter or bigger racket.

    Anyway, like I said - demo, try different rackets and find one that works. Maybe it is a heavier, smaller racket, maybe it is not.
     
    #12
  13. drakulie

    drakulie Talk Tennis Guru

    Joined:
    May 3, 2004
    Messages:
    24,466
    Location:
    FT. Lauderdale, Florida
    mUAHAHAHAHAHA!
    [​IMG]
     
    #13
  14. 1012007

    1012007 Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Nov 29, 2007
    Messages:
    2,531
    Location:
    UK
    doc - Get Back In The Other Thread:):)
     
    #14
  15. JRstriker12

    JRstriker12 Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2006
    Messages:
    3,374
    Drak - where do you get those images?

    LOL!
     
    #15
  16. drakulie

    drakulie Talk Tennis Guru

    Joined:
    May 3, 2004
    Messages:
    24,466
    Location:
    FT. Lauderdale, Florida
    What do you mean, "those images"??? That's me! :)

    [​IMG]
     
    #16
  17. Doc Hollidae

    Doc Hollidae Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2006
    Messages:
    1,719
    Yes, I still believe it is bad advice. I understand the logic behind your reasoning, however, I still believe tennis equipment is a matter of preference. Just because a racket head is smaller doesn't mean it's going to force you to use proper technique and what not. The majority of beginning and lower level players I see with rackets too demanding for them, end up with bad habits and kinks in their technique. I don't think that going for an MP that +11 oz. is necessarily a bad idea, but you shouldn't rule out an OS just because of the larger head size or a tweener because it's lighter. Demo as much as you can and be unbiased when you do it. It's ok to have a general idea of what you'd like to try, but be willing to try anything and everything.

    My first racket was 95 sq in, but I switched to an OS shortly after because I liked the way it felt. I felt like I hit better kickers and I returned better with an OS. I wasn't having issues with hitting the sweet spot, just prefered the larger head. Just like others prefer mids, but it doesn't mean the mid player is any more skilled or technically sound than the OS Player.
     
    #17
  18. OrangeOne

    OrangeOne Legend

    Joined:
    May 31, 2006
    Messages:
    6,295
    Firstly, welcome to the boards.

    Secondly, the issue you present is one of the most over-discussed issues here, and there is certainly no clear consensus, and if you search you will find that it has been discussed hundreds of times.

    What I will say is that no racquet can force someone to use "proper" technique. People can end up with hideous technique while using any racquet at all, too heavy, too light, etc etc!

    If a racquet is the wrong racquet for a player at that time in their playing 'career', it is likely that it will impact negatively on their game, and possibly on their shots. Too light and powerful may lead to people chopping at shots, too heavy and small may lead to players not getting enough spin, a frame that's 'in the middle' will likely be wrong for some players too.

    My advice: Try 10 or so different frames, find the one you find most comfortable and that you play best with NOW, and use it. Re-evaluate in a year or 2's time....
     
    #18
  19. AmericanTemplar

    AmericanTemplar Professional

    Joined:
    Aug 11, 2005
    Messages:
    938
    Location:
    San Francisco, CA
    I agree that you should demo several frames without bias before settling on anything. It's no fun to spend all day hitting framers with a heavy racquet, nor do you want a racquet that's buckling because it's too light. The search for the right equipment is part of the fun of the game.
     
    #19

Share This Page