Smaller head for 1hb

Discussion in 'Racquets' started by Wilander Fan, Mar 7, 2012.

  1. Wilander Fan

    Wilander Fan Hall of Fame

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    Does a smaller heavier racket head benefit a 1hb (maneuverability)?
     
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  2. 0d1n

    0d1n Hall of Fame

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    No.
    10 boring characters
    :-|
     
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  3. Gee

    Gee Professional

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    Completely BS! It's all about technique. You need to prepare your stroke earlier if you think your racquet isn't maneuverable enough.

    Wawrinka plays with a midplus racquet who has one of the best backhands of the world in my opinion. And what about Gasquet? Does he play with a mid? No! They would if it really improved their game.
     
    Last edited: Mar 7, 2012
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  4. sansaephanh

    sansaephanh Professional

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    Someone told me to start my swing right when the ball bounces, that means prepare years before the ball even bounces. If the racket is heavy enough that you can't swing fast enough don't use it. The same goes for light rackets. If it gets pushed around and you're swinging too quickly you should switch or add lead.
     
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  5. michael_1265

    michael_1265 Professional

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    I would think the opposite. For me, a smaller, heavier racquet makes my 2HBH a beast, though. My 2HBH tends to land a little short, and the extra weight of a racquet like the K90 is a great help. Unfortunately, the rest of my game isn't good enough for the K90.
     
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  6. 6-2/6-4/6-0

    6-2/6-4/6-0 Semi-Pro

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    I think the stability of a mid or mid-plus racket is a benefit without having the second hand on the racket. I personally have never felt comfortable with anything larger than a 95 or possibly 98 with the 1HB.

    As for weight, I think the additional stability that is provided by a good solid racket is nice for a 1HB.

    The big issue is what can you swing and what can you hit the sweet spot with?
     
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  7. bluetrain4

    bluetrain4 Legend

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    I'd agree the issue is more stability than head size. Think back to when they made heavier, very stable OS frames (not just midplus). Sabatini, for example, had an exceptional one-hander, and she wasn't the only one-hander using a larger sized head. Of course, using pros for examples is of questionable value.
     
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  8. Larrysümmers

    Larrysümmers Hall of Fame

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    a thin framed mid size cuts through the air better than a thicker bigger head sized rackets, making it easier to accel. the racket head. ive played with rackets up to 107 with a 1hander and as long as the wt is there, its fine.
     
    Last edited: Mar 7, 2012
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  9. adso1973

    adso1973 Semi-Pro

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    I believe that most of the last 1HBH players are with Mid Plus frames, Gasquet, Youzny, Lopez, Wawrinka, Lubicic, Hass, Guga.

    I always felt better with 90-95'' heavy frames on my 1HBH, as it gives me the stability and power I'm used but I've moved to MP slightly more powered and lighter frames 98-100'' in order to have some more free power and racquet head speed from the baseline that suits a little better modern game if you don't the same technique as Gaudio or Federer.

    Cheers
     
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  10. eagle

    eagle Hall of Fame

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  11. fuzz nation

    fuzz nation Legend

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    I just had my first outdoor singles hit in a couple of months and was surprised with how much better my one-hander felt with my heaviest mids. Usually I consider these soft, heavy frames as my "trainers" more than my go-to players, but the heft and stability was wonderful in comparison with my 98" Volkls.

    I even took out those heavier mids after I'd been using my lighter mid-plus gear for over an hour. I thought my timing would be awful, but that weight made their swing personality feel smooth and predictable.

    I think that since most mids are typically also heavier in their stock layout (the recent Dunlop 100's could be an exception), it might seem that the smaller head makes some contribution to the 1hbh, but my money is on this extra inertia that's usually on board.
     
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  12. Wilander Fan

    Wilander Fan Hall of Fame

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    Went from APDGT to an Aero Storm GT and instantly felt much better on the 1hb. ASGT was much softer and more stable. I then added 20g of lead and which also immensely improved the racket on the 1hb, serves and especially returns since the light frame shook against big serves.

    Still, the stick lacks some maneuverability and maybe a little too long. It feels like it was made for a 2hb and i can see I am hitting on the lower part of the sweet spot quite alot and my hand starts to creep up the handle a little. I still quite like the racket but I wonder if there is a stick that has the stability and softness but feels more like an extension of my arm. I think the latter issue might be an issue of the head being bigger than I like (98inches).
     
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  13. netguy

    netguy Semi-Pro

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    I went from a
    Volkl PB10 Mid (head size 93 and 12.5 oz. with lead tape) to a Dunlop 4D 100 (head size 90 and 11.9 oz. with lead tape), so
    the answer in my case is:
    smaller head size and lighter frame does improve maneuverability.
     
    Last edited: Mar 8, 2012
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  14. Winners or Errors

    Winners or Errors Professional

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    It's all about feel and confidence. If I could find a 95" or 98" frame that felt right, I'd jump on it. So far, I've tried a few midplus frames for extended periods of time (Dunlop M-Fil 200 and Volkl Tour 9 V-Engine), and both produced a feel that just didn't inspire confidence. I played the last tennis season with virtually no backhand, so much confidence had I lost...

    I decided, since I really learned how to play tennis with mids (Black Max, White Star Pro Masters, Max Impact Mid, Lendl GTX Pro), to switch to the 4D100. Lo and behold, my backhand returned and I can find the ball on the strings, as well as hit backhands again.

    For me, my OHBH is all about feel and confidence. The forehand, serve, and volleys work with anything. The backhand has "special needs," and since I love my OHBH, I'm willing to play only with racquets that make it work.

    YMMV, but that's my experience.
     
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  15. bertrevert

    bertrevert Hall of Fame

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    I constantly wonder about this and reckon since it comes up on the board so often there must be some substance in it.

    So if we agree to say yes there's something in this then could we explain the ease of a smaller racquet physiologically?

    The triceps and back of shoulder pulling the racquet through on the 1HBH are less strong than the biceps and the front of the shoulder on the 1HFH - hence a more manoeuvrable agile racquet is preferable.

    Or is it a matter of timing and feeling the ball - the smaller racquet head allows us to middle and feel the 1HBH simply in a better, more concise, way.

    I'm perplexed as to explaining it.

    Except to add, that a recent try-out of the BLX Pro Open confirmed my fears that I just couldn't judge my 1HBH at all with the large head and I am back to my 95s head racquets (and also the Speed 300 MP a low-powered small sweetspot 100).
     
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  16. UCSF2012

    UCSF2012 Hall of Fame

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    If you have excellent technique, then you can use any racket. If you're normal and have almost good enough technique, 1hbh's are better using a heavy mid.

    At this moment in time, I can do a 1hbh on most rackets. Once upon a time, I HAD to use the PS85.
     
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  17. lgbalfa

    lgbalfa Professional

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    well said.
     
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  18. 2Hare

    2Hare Semi-Pro

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    I think this theory of smaller head for 1hbh started because smaller head tends to have better plow through and stability with mass concentrated closer to the middle, and better plow through tends to translate more comfortable and controllable 1hbh.

    You probably started this thread with Federer in mind. The fact is Federer is constantly missing the sweet spot hitting his 1hbh if you watch enough of highlights of his backhands. A lot of those down the line winners or crazy angle 1hbh are often the result of shots close to to the edge of frame. But because sixone 90 has so much plow compared to other rackets, the balls stayed in. this is probably why gonzalez and sampras lead up their 3 and 9 with layers of lead to increase the stability of their rackets as well.

    I think the take away is that rackets with good plow through and stability would often translate to better 1hbh rackets. Doesn't matter what head size it is, as long as a racket is stable enough, it'll probably a good 1hbh racket.
     
    Last edited: Mar 13, 2012
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  19. AlpineCadet

    AlpineCadet Hall of Fame

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    Depends on how you plow through the ball. Your technique/footwork/timing are what you rely on and the racket is just there to amplify/reduce what you put into the shot. HH/HL, leather/syn grip, poly/syn gut/hybrid, polarized/depolarized, j0llyroger/joeldali, pepsi/coke, strokes are strokes, and you can't buy Wins via equipment if you don't understand your own strokes. :oops:
     
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  20. Power Player

    Power Player G.O.A.T.

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    Why are you so obsessed with jolly and Joal? It's super freaking weird man.
     
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  21. Xizel

    Xizel Professional

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    IMO, the head size isn't significant. A 95 or a mid would make me feel like Federer, but the main thing is the weight. OHBH in the 12 oz range can't be beaten.
     
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  22. AlpineCadet

    AlpineCadet Hall of Fame

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    Are you concerned about me and what I post? That's nice of you, thanks. But where have you been the past 5+ years? It was like one of the biggest jokes on TTW, and now it's a classic one IMO.

    Anyway, let me answer your rhetorical question with a summary of how/why I barely mentioned them in my post: JR claimed to be an Open Level player but was eventually exposed as local tennis hack, while his entire posse trolled around every thread backing up his performance claims. ALSO, JR would talk smack/put down the "lesser" players, and it all just became a comedy show for us when we eventually saw his videos and continued to see him posting about his godliness/killing his kevlar/poly setup within a few hours of hitting/saving kittens from trees/smacking flies off the faces of baby Ethiopians.

    What's super freaking weird man was that JR even sent out packages and gifts to people who supported him. :rolleyes: JD was a major supporter of all that junk and now he can't even be taken seriously when he posts. :oops: It's a shame, but now JR/JD are now included into the TTW urban dictionary when it comes to shams/posers. So you'll have to forgive me if I use them as examples of such. End of long reply.
     
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