So what's a 'player's racquet' anyway?

Discussion in 'Racquets' started by HackersRUs, Oct 31, 2013.

  1. HackersRUs

    HackersRUs Rookie

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    All around you, you just have to listen.
    I've always been a head light heavy frame kind of a guy but I had the pleasure of watching an amazing league match the other night featuring one former touring pro, a young man signed to a DI college in Texas for next year, the State open number 1 and a certain TTW member who perennially underrates himself around here, and I noticed something interesting.

    All of these seriously high level players were using 'tweeners'!

    There was a Juice Pro, a Pure Drive, a Blade 98 (only just a tweener I grant you) and a Donnay Formula 100 of all things..

    Then, if you go to a challenger or futures event, it's all APDs, PDs and Speeds.

    You don't see many of these young pros with a 6.1 90 or a Prestige mid
    (actually, I haven't seen any, but no doubt someone will chime in with an example, so..)

    So now I am questioning myself and my whole idea of what a 'player's frame' really is..

    Is it what actual pros and top level players are using, or is it some ideal of a HL 13 oz club with a tiny head and a flex like a wet noodle?
     
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  2. Overdrive

    Overdrive Legend

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    Use the search tab. This question has been asked multiple times. It takes less than 30 seconds..
     
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  3. Attila_the_gorilla

    Attila_the_gorilla Professional

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    Polyester turns a tweener into a player's racket.
     
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  4. joemanblues

    joemanblues New User

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    I would say its a racquet that rewards the fundamentals i.e. the setup of a shot with power spin and accuracy, and if you don't do it well it punishes you with a powerless dinky shot, I've used the K90 since it came out and this seems to be the way it works, as for seeing all APD's in the tournaments well just check out federer's and Dimitrov's sticks.
     
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  5. robbo1970

    robbo1970 Hall of Fame

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    It's one of the terms that is supposed to categorise certain racquets that are suitable for 'advanced' players. Usually one that is heavy with smaller head (sub 98).

    But it is all subjective really. With the amount of larger headed racquets that get used by the pro's these days, I think the terms 'players' and 'tweener' are becoming rapidly outdated.

    It's all about the racquet and string set up that suits the player best.
     
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  6. Vlad_C

    Vlad_C Semi-Pro

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    That is the case around here as well, you can see PDs everywhere.
    But that is because Babolat is very aggressively going after these young guys with sponsorship/partial sponsorship deals. For most of them, money is tight, and they'll take whatever deal they can get.

    That said, the Pure Drive is not a bad racquet.
    Add some lead to it, and you'll have a real weapon in your hands.
     
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  7. IA-SteveB

    IA-SteveB Professional

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    What is the typical setup for leading up a PD?
     
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  8. max

    max Hall of Fame

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    This is an interesting observation. Maybe we've got to the point where we understand customization to the point that general tips make no sense.

    That's not such a bad place to be.
     
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  9. DustinW

    DustinW Semi-Pro

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    IMO anything 11 oz or more, head light balance, and 100 sq in or less goes into the same category because they could be used anywhere from a 3.5 up to the pro level with the right string setup and/or customizations... that's irregardless of stiffness, beam width, or any other specs. I don't see any reason to try to put this group of frames into subcategories.
     
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  10. SCRAP IRON

    SCRAP IRON Professional

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    This poster is accurate but I would add that the modern grip and subsequent style of play has blurred the definitive lines of "player's" frames from a decade ago. The racket does need to have enough weight/stability to handle heavy hitters of course.
     
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  11. TennisCJC

    TennisCJC Legend

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    My opinion is blade 98 and speed are players frames. Thin beam frames with higher weight or swing weight I consider players frames. PD, AeroPro, wider Prince frames; I consider tweeners. New volkl v1 pro is sort of between players and tweener.
     
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  12. dflores

    dflores Guest

    "New volkl v1 pro is sort of between players and tweener." Cool, a new class, the "Protween." I like it.

    Kidding aside, I think in today's era, the characteristics of a players racquet are: lower power, more control, and higher swingweight. With customization, you can make most racquets fit this profile.
     
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  13. bluetrain4

    bluetrain4 Legend

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    Or, get the Roddick version (PDR), which is heavier and more stable (sort of mimicking the addition of lead to a standard version), but still crisp and manueverable.

    Though, if you want something between the standard PD and the PDR, or the PDR is not balanced to your preference, then a leaded up standard PD is probably the way to go.
     
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  14. Sander001

    Sander001 Hall of Fame

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    An outdated term since the advent of coated polyester strings.
     
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  15. mattavery24

    mattavery24 Rookie

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    What about customizing a PD or an APD? Does that turn them into players frames if they are over an ounce heavier than stock and more headlight?
     
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  16. Lukhas

    Lukhas Legend

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    ^That wouldn't make them any lighter, smaller or less stiff. Even if I think neither the PD or the APD are the easiest frames to use. Just because of their enormous power.
     
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  17. BLX_Andy

    BLX_Andy Professional

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    Lead? Why not use the Roddick version? It's regular and plus models are heavier than their respective non-Roddick models.
     
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  18. Egoista

    Egoista Professional

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    sad not many people use midsizes any more. I would nevER change. 20 years strong with a mid
     
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  19. struggle

    struggle Hall of Fame

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    players racket = not a rocket launcher.

    that pretty much sums it up.

    edit: it's a "cool" factor for some. i use one because i like the "older/classic" feel as i
    just started playing again 4 years ago since quitting after high school ('87).
    nonetheless i could likely benefit from a "tweener as i could use some more power,
    but my shoulder and elbow issues scare me away from trying them much (i used
    the speedport black LB for awhile, fighting issues since).
     
    Last edited: Nov 1, 2013
    #19
  20. Overdrive

    Overdrive Legend

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    The classic mids are hard to find...
     
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  21. anubis

    anubis Hall of Fame

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    "Player's racquet" is a term that represents the old school types of racquets.
    A lot of players who use them may agree on many, if not all of the following descriptions:
    • Smaller head sizes
    • Smaller sweet spot
    • Less forgiving to off-center hits
    • Denser string patterns
    • Boxy beams, or thin beams
    • Flexible
    • Higher mass
    • Lower powered

    "tweeners" represent the new school of thought:
    • Larger head sizes
    • Larger sweet spots
    • More forgiving for off-center shots
    • Open string patterns
    • Thicker, rounder layups
    • Stiffer layups
    • More powerful
    • Low mass


    But, there's also a lot of hybrid frames that sort of straddle both sides.
     
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  22. Vlad_C

    Vlad_C Semi-Pro

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    It depends on personal preference, I guess.
    For me, I'd just get the PD Roddick - a little heavier, slightly higher SW too.
     
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  23. kingcheetah

    kingcheetah Professional

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    Players are definitely moving towards larger headsizes, but they aren't keeping the stock weight of the 98s and 100s that they use. I think the logic there is that since poly strings are so prevalent, and are somewhat of a must-have for the spin production that players need these days, fewer players are looking for tremendous feel, because while nice it isn't as crucial for a baseline game as it is for a serve and volley game. They'd rather take the forgiveness and spin potential a mid plus ofers than the absolute "purest" feel a mid offers(which is a matter of opinion, but I digress)
     
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  24. Timbo's hopeless slice

    Timbo's hopeless slice Hall of Fame

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    Yes. I think the OP was suggesting the definition of a 'player's racquet' needs to change since most of the really good players these days are using MP frames, mostly with wider beams..

    LOL at whoever mentioned Federer and Dimitrov. Yes, two out of how many???
     
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  25. kingcheetah

    kingcheetah Professional

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    Maybe it should be more based on the weight and swingweight than the headsize? Of course we all know the smart*** answer, "a player's racquet can be anything as long as it's in the hands of a player"
     
    #25
  26. bhupaes

    bhupaes Professional

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    It is really tough to pin down the characteristics of a player's racquet. I finally came up with this definition: A player's racquet allows a player to maximize his/her shot quality. Every player is different, and the optimal player's racquet for me may not be the right one for someone else.

    That said, player's racquets tend to have some qualities in common. They tend to be heavier and have higher swingweight than the popular racquets, and so have inherently more control and power/spin potential. To properly harness the capabilities of the racquet, one needs to have good technique. One can swish around a very light racquet using only the arm and generate power to some extent, but if proper technique is employed, a player's racquet will yield more power that can be harnessed more easily.

    I wouldn't try to pin down a player's racquet any more specifically!
     
    #26
  27. vandre

    vandre Hall of Fame

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    "the only real 'player's racquet' is a woodie"- breakpoint :twisted:
     
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  28. RiggensAuroraHO

    RiggensAuroraHO Rookie

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    "'Player's Racquets'.....what players play with.....DUH!"
     
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