Some slice questions and answers.

Discussion in 'Former Pro Player Talk' started by BTURNER, Nov 10, 2009.

  1. BTURNER

    BTURNER Hall of Fame

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    If memory serves, Evert and Connors were the first two, to have two handed backhand slices in the pro era ( both hands stayed on). ( I THINK Borg took one hand off at the last moment on his backhand slice but I rarely saw the stroke)

    Wilander and Sanchez Vicario were the first two handed backhand players to utilize a conventional one handed slice shot in their repetoire.

    Wasn't Seles the last major player to keep both hands on her slices? Do any of the two handed players use a two handed slice?

    The last two women I saw use the forehand slice consistently as opposed to rarely was EVert and Goolagong. As for the men, I can't think of many in the last thirty years except Connors and Mecir even as a change of pace.

    Where am I wrong/ Is there any role for aan underspin forehand in the men's game and should players even bother to learn it?
     
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  2. Ripper014

    Ripper014 Hall of Fame

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    It is still used... as a change of pace or defensive shot to gain some time on the baseline. You will see Federer use it occasionally in desperation on full stretch.... it will look a little like a squash shot.

    I don't think you see the 2-handed backhand slice because it is not natural to hit... I think you need to breakdown the leading arm to do it. But I don't hit with 2 hands so maybe someone who does could provide better input.
     
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  3. Jonny S&V

    Jonny S&V Hall of Fame

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    Now retired Fabrice Santoro used a two-handed slice forehand consistently on the men's tour, as does Monica Nicolescu on the women's tour (although she hits every shot in the book, one and two handed...).

    Yes, especially in today's game, you need to learn a slice forehand. Even if you never use/need it for a change up (I use it quite often), there some shots when you are on pure defense where it is essential to have.
     
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  4. BTURNER

    BTURNER Hall of Fame

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    Yes I know the defensive squash shot is still in play as a desperation move, but other than that. Its just not done, even to get to net on grass, the last breaths of forehand slice as an offensive tool.
     
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  5. GS

    GS Professional

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    I liked Courier's 2-handed backhand slice. Now I use it, and it works pretty well. It's got alot more punch than my 1-handed slice. I'm a 4.5.
    My friend is a 5.0 and has a wicked one-handed forehand slice, used mostly as an approach shot.
     
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  6. BTURNER

    BTURNER Hall of Fame

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    LOL the magician , of course used it! there is no shot he did not have in his hat or pull out! he is the exception to every informal rule ever written!
     
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  7. pc1

    pc1 Legend

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    I think slices are always useful at times. One of Roger Federer's greatest plays is his soft sharp backhand slice which draws his opponents up. Many of them don't know what to do, should they continue forward and approach the net and face the dangerous Federer passing shots or should they move back defensively and try to survive. Either way I've noticed Federer usually wins the point.

    Ashe used slices on the backhand and forehand to defeat Connors at Wimbledon in 1975.

    It's always good to have some variety.

    I think one of the reasons underspin forehands aren't used much nowadays is because it is so easy, especially with the new rackets to hit topspin. Slice backhands aren't that common because of the natural two handed backhand drives with topspin.
     
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  8. BTURNER

    BTURNER Hall of Fame

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    I guess what I am saying is the forehand slice is a dead shot ( as opposed to a defensive chop) on the pro tour and the two handed slice is a dead shot on the pro tour or at least in a prolonged coma
     
    Last edited: Nov 10, 2009
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  9. LDVTennis

    LDVTennis Professional

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    The slice forehand isn't that tough a shot to hit. It's easier to close the racquet face on a slice forehand than on a slice backhand, with the right to left action seeming more natural.

    There are also not many uses for it in today's men's game. The one-handed players (on the men's side at least) don't tend to get overpowered on the forehand return of serve. So, there's really no need to resort to slice on that side with any regularity. You'll see it happen from time to time, but not as a designed play.

    What we should be lamenting is the lack of forehand dropshots, an offshoot of the slice or chip forehand. Now, here's a shot whose existence depended in part on the vitality of a slice forehand. If players sliced more from that side, I think we'd also see more well-hit forehand dropshots.
     
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  10. Jonny S&V

    Jonny S&V Hall of Fame

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    Watch some of the women at Wimbledon (particularly Mauresmo in her prime e.g. 2006) and you'll see them hitting plenty of slice forehands (I've even seen Sharapova try to use it as a change up).
     
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  11. BTURNER

    BTURNER Hall of Fame

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    What we should be lamenting is the lack of forehand dropshots, an offshoot of the slice or chip forehand. Now, here's a shot whose existence depended in part on the vitality of a slice forehand. If players sliced more from that side, I think we'd also see more well-hit forehand dropshots.[/QUOTE]

    You are so right. The only player man or woman since the end of the wood era to hit that forehand dropper routinely better than than their backhand dropper was Evert. That is thanks to her routine slice/sidespin forehand. Others tried it with mixed success. I saw Lendl and Graf and Federer use it successfully because their drive forehands were so anticipated and feared, everyone stayed three feet further back and the dropper did not need the disguise! For Evert is was so well disguised, so well hit and ( this is the important point) so intelligently used is was a real weapon!
     
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  12. Moose Malloy

    Moose Malloy Legend

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    I think Coria's fh drop shot was better than his bh.
     
    Last edited: Nov 11, 2009
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