Sorry for the syntax. Any reasonable conclusions possible about your opponent when

Discussion in 'Adult League & Tournament Talk' started by DeShaun, Sep 6, 2011.

  1. DeShaun

    DeShaun Banned

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    you know the scores for his last six matches that he played, if you do not know him nor have you ever seen him, nor are you acquainted with anyone opponent's game that he dealt with compiling those scores?
    What useful can be concluded about these data?
     
    Last edited: Sep 6, 2011
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  2. spot

    spot Hall of Fame

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    Of course the only conclusions you can draw would be based on how much information you know about the opponents. If you know NOTHING then you can't draw any inferences. But if you know that all 6 opponents were playing in a 3.5 Ultimate Tennis league then you certainly can start to draw conclusions.
     
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  3. Govnor

    Govnor Professional

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    useless without knowledge of the opponents IMO
     
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  4. goran_ace

    goran_ace Hall of Fame

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    assuming all of those matches are within the same division/level, if he is undefeated and wins every set 6-1 or better you can reasonably conclude he is a stronger player relative to your division. If he's winless and losing every set 6-1 or worse you can conclude he's a relatively weaker player.

    If he's got a bunch of three-set close match wins (e.g. 5-7 6-4 7-5) you can conclude that this guy doesn't roll over after dropping the first set and that you are going you have to play a complete match to win.

    Other than that, no, you really can't read too much into his past scores.
     
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  5. goober

    goober Legend

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    I think there are some very general inferences you can make.

    If these were flex league wins- not as impressive (unless he was winning by large margins) as there are many people who self rate too high or deliberately play at a higher level.

    USTA team matches or tournament matches- more accurate gauge of his ability within a specific level.

    One thing you can do if you have time is look up all the records of his opponents and try to gauge how good his opponents were by their records. You might be able to find somebody you know if you snoop enough.
     
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  6. LuckyR

    LuckyR Legend

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    Players who ask these sorts of questions likely know that they are very inquisitive by nature but are a little concerned that there might be a downside to all of this pre-match mental gymnastics.

    I agree with you, you are likely wasting energy trying to know the unknowable. Concentrate your energies on a topic you know better than anyone else, yourself.
     
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  7. NoSkillzAndy

    NoSkillzAndy Rookie

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    I disagree with the posters who are saying you can't infer much from online results. IMO you can get a pretty good idea of who you're up against just by looking at their 12 month tournament results and their league results. You can also check out tennisinformation.com, although it's not as up-to-date as it used to be.

    Some things to look for:
    * How often do they play USTA matches?
    * What events do they play (singles, doubles, mixed)?
    * What divisions do they play? Do they like to play up sometimes and challenge themselves or do they stick with their usual level?
    * Win/loss record
    * Record against "good" players (players with a winning percentage)

    Possible conclusions to draw:
    * Players that don't play often in league or tournaments usually aren't as sharp with their strokes and mental focus. If you can play within yourself and play percentage tennis you should be fine. (The exception to this is a really good player that doesn't play often, but that will be obvious based on his win/loss record).
    * Players that play mostly one type of event, singles or doubles, tend to be quite a bit weaker in the other one. A singles player in doubles probably will have shakey volleys, positioning issues, and might leave groundies high across the middle. A doubles player in singles probably won't be too comfortable in long rallies from the baseline and won't like having to do so much work to win points at the net compared with doubles.
    * Players that play "up" from time to time are usually fiesty types who aren't afraid of putting themselves out there and will fight hard against whoever they're playing. Know that you'll be in a battle here.
    * Win/loss record isn't super indicative IMO, but it can be helpful. Someone who wins a lot of matches probably plays the big points really well, so you have to focus on getting up in every game and really playing the big points well. This player might not be any better stroke-wise than their peers, but they know how to win. If the win/loss record is extreme one way or the other, you're probably playing someone out of level.
    * I think one of the most important stats to look at is how people do when they face tough opponents. Anyone can rack up wins in some podunk tournament or in the consolation rounds where half the people don't really want to be there or at line 3 doubles in league, etc. But how do they do when they play against the top players, or anyone with a winning record for that matter? It's not necessarily important to see if they win or not, but if they are able to compete well on a consistent basis with good players then you know you're going to get a tough match even though their win/loss record might not really stand out.
     
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  8. DeShaun

    DeShaun Banned

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    My next tournament opponent has won his past seven USTA matches, but I know nothing of the caliber of the competition he faced. I'm excited to be able to face this guy because I expect him to be a real good player.
     
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  9. LuckyR

    LuckyR Legend

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    While possibly true, the first 20 seconds of the warmup will give you more information.
     
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  10. tennismonkey

    tennismonkey Semi-Pro

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    actually in my experience watching a guy in warmups gives only a little glimpse into his potential.

    the first two games is my barometer. first service game and first return game. far too many guys who's looked amazing in warmups and fizzled in match play. and guys in warmups who look like hacks and then look like studs in match play.
     
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  11. dcdoorknob

    dcdoorknob Hall of Fame

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    For me warmups can mean a good bit. It's not about how hard they are hitting the ball, but if they are making clean contact through the ball every time and the ball is going where they want it to go (even if they're aiming down the middle of the court, as is reasonable in a warmup), then I know right away that it won't be a particularly easy match. This is at the 3.5 level, and it seems to be a pretty consistently good indicator of things for me.
     
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  12. LuckyR

    LuckyR Legend

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    Our posts are both correct.
     
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