Standstill's and my fitness program

Discussion in 'Health & Fitness' started by Sandwichman, Feb 25, 2012.

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What do you think?

  1. Go for it!

    2 vote(s)
    18.2%
  2. You will die if you do this

    3 vote(s)
    27.3%
  3. You will give up halfway through the first day

    6 vote(s)
    54.5%
  1. Sandwichman

    Sandwichman Rookie

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    Okay guys do for about a week now my friend Standstill ad I have been striving for the toughest summer tennis program in existence. We go to a YMCA that has a summer clinic from 2:00-5:00, but this is what we've come up with. And yes we are insane.

    4:45- Wake up
    4:50- Eat breakfast
    5:00- Leave
    5:15- Pick up another friend who wants to do the program with us
    5:40- Arrive at the Y
    5:45- Squat/Plank pyramid (You do ten squats followed by a thirty second plank, then 20 squats followed by a 45 second plank, all the way up to 100 squats and a 3 minute plank)
    6:25- 200 calf raises
    6:31-Sit-ups for one minute
    6:33- 200 calf raises
    6:39- Sit-ups for one minute
    6:41- 200 lunges
    6:49- 25 ins and outs (an Ab exercise)
    6:51- 200 lunges
    6:59- 25 ins and outs
    7:01- 5 minutes worth of wall-sits (go as long as possible, get 5 minutes in total)
    7:08- Rest
    7:11- Pushups for one minute
    7:13- Pull-ups
    7:15-  30 dips
    7:17- Pushup/30 second plank pyramid (1 pushup, 30 second plank. Up to 10 and back down to 1)
    7:37- 30 dips
    7:39- Pull-ups
    7:41- 30 dips
    7:43- 100 pushups
    8:01- 20 wrist rollers
    8:21- Pushups (as many as you can do)
    8:23- Rest
    8:26- Ab ripper X (from P90X) (It's impossible)
    9:01- Rest
    9:04- 1 mile indoors (as fast as possible)
    9:11- 5 minutes 25 second suicides (you do the last three lines of a court for one suicide, and you do one every twenty five seconds) (roughly 12 suicides)
    9:16- 3 miles outdoors in a nearby park (Paced)
    9:46- Swim/relax
    10:20- Get out of pool and change
    10:25- Eat
    10:55- Get tennis balls and go to courts
    11:00- Footwork/Volleys drills rotation
    11:30- Serve/returns rotations
    1:00- Two-on-Ones rotations/drills
    1:45- 5-minute tiebreakers round-robin
    2:00- Pick up balls
    2:10- Go to clinic
    2:10- Clinic
    4:00- 25 second suicides during our 15 minute break
    4:15- Finish Clinic
    5:00- Go to reserved courts
    5:05- 5-minute warmup (new balls?)
    5:10- Begin a best-of-five match while the third guy tracks the match with the app
    8:00- (At latest) Finish best-of-five
    8:05- Feast
    8:40- Return home
    9:00- Sleep
    4:45- Repeat

    So what do you guys think? Impossible enough?
     
    #1
  2. Anton

    Anton Hall of Fame

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    I'd eat before relaxing at the pool, so you have more time to digest.
     
    #2
  3. r2473

    r2473 Legend

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    It's fun to stay at the Y-M-C-A
     
    #3
  4. kengan

    kengan New User

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    I can't see any non-professional athletes surviving this
     
    #4
  5. Bartelby

    Bartelby G.O.A.T.

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    I know there has to be some method to an exercise program, but the overly timetabled, overly prescriptive regimes that seem to be on offer - which this seems to drive to the ultimate degree - strike me as counter-productive.

    Simple, easily-learned and variable programs would be better, although harder for commercial providers to sell as somehow unique.
     
    #5
  6. Standstill

    Standstill Rookie

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    Hello people!

    The perfectly calculated minutes and things like that may make us look crazy (and we are) but it's really a lot simpler than that.

    We have 4 hours of fitness work, 1 hour of rest/recovery, 2 hours of tennis, 3 hours of a tennis clinic, and then a best of five set match which will probably last 2+ hours. It's simple enough :)

    We honestly are just trying to throw ourselves at the slightest possibility of success that we could achieve. At least in my case, I have high goals and I love the game more than almost anything. However, I started almost disastrously late and, though I've worked hard, am dumped with a very small percentage chance of DI success, much less professional.

    So we've got a lot of time to make up for.
    Why not in the most important summer of our "careers" so far, just kill ourselves and maybe give ourselves a chance to actually succeed?

    I think we can handle this. If we complete it, we'll be ironmen, and as mentally strong as any professional. Certainly more than Ernests Gulbis :)
     
    #6
  7. maverick66

    maverick66 Hall of Fame

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    I cant see any profesional athlete surviving this.

    scale it way back and train smart not longer.
     
    #7
  8. Blee1613

    Blee1613 Semi-Pro

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    Doing this enormous amount of exercise will end up hurting you and not helping you. Muscles require rest to grow, and by not giving yourself any respite at all you'll impede growth.
     
    #8
  9. purge

    purge Hall of Fame

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    not gonna help imo
     
    #9
  10. Champs990411

    Champs990411 Rookie

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    Can't even begin describing what's wrong with that "plan". I subscribed to the thread because I'd like to see how this turns out.
     
    #10
  11. OTMPut

    OTMPut Hall of Fame

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    90% diet + 10% exercise.

    Secret formula: ditch processed bull ****. you will be in an enviable and painless shape in no time.
     
    #11
  12. Standstill

    Standstill Rookie

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    How about doing this once or twice a week? Would alternating this and scaled back days offer enough opportunity for rest?
     
    #12
  13. charliefedererer

    charliefedererer Legend

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    Your enthusiams is tremendous!!!

    But...

    ... You have to understand that muscles, tendons, ligaments and cartilage all develop microscopic tears from the stress of exercise.

    The tears are very small at first, like the small holes in Swiss Cheese:
    [​IMG]


    The body repairs these microscopic tears with protein strands that are similar to a spider's web:

    [​IMG]

    And I'm sure we all remember from the Spiderman movies that these protein strands on a per weight basis are stronger than steel.

    But we also all know that to disrupt a spider's protein strand web, all we have to do is wiggle our finger in it.

    That's because any one protein strand is too thin and fragile.

    It takes thousands of strands all laid down and then interconnected in a tight weave to get real strength. And that takes many weeks for the body to "fill in" and "heal" each of those tiny little tears.

    [​IMG]


    Training too hard means the rate of microscopic tears exceeds the repair rate.

    Then, rather than the tears healing, they expand, tearing from one small tear to another until you have a serious problem:
    [​IMG]


    I would urge you to rethink your regimen.
    Perhaps you could benefit from investing $20 total to get used copies of both these books and look at the volume of training in each:
    Power Tennis Training by Donald Chu
    Tennis Training: Enhancing On-court Performance by Mark Kovacs PhD, W. Britt Chandler MS, T. Jeff Chandler EdD
    http://www.amazon.com/Power-Tennis-Training-Donald-Chu/dp/087322616X
    You may also see that off court strengthening programs are usually progressive from strengthening to power exercise based regimens.
    Both stress this periodization in training.
    Donald Chu, in particular, has more clearly delineated blocks of training, with each involving weight training and court drills, but building towards the final power block at the end of the 12 week program. [You of course could increase or decrease somewhat the length of the blocks.]
    Your "program" seems to be a mishmash that will tire you out or produce overuse injuries rather than taking a step by step approach of improvement.


    By the way, did I mention I love your enthusiasm!!!
     
    #13
  14. Kobble

    Kobble Hall of Fame

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    Don't be surprised if you can't get a hard-on after that program.
     
    #14
  15. mberrevoets

    mberrevoets New User

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    I agree with Charlie. You are only going to hurt yourself if you attempt this program. Recovery is as important as exercise. you would also be getting less than 8 hours of sleep which is not nearly enough for that activity level. Not sure what doing planks is going to do for you either.
     
    #15
  16. Sandwichman

    Sandwichman Rookie

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    Charlie, would you recommend doing just the leg workout one day, and the upper body the next? We were only thinking about doing this whole schedule once or twice a week, and we have a specific recovery regimen for the days immediately after what we have above.
     
    #16
  17. r2473

    r2473 Legend

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    Just do it and see how it goes.

    If its too much, use your own noodle and scale it back to fit your needs.

    Likewise, if its not enough, use your own feedback and add more.

    Nobody can tell how you will react to this schedule until you do it.

    SO GET OFF YOUR ASS AND GO DO IT AND STOP TALKING ABOUT IT ALREADY!!!!
     
    #17
  18. charliefedererer

    charliefedererer Legend

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    Whew!

    It sounded in the opening post you were intent on doing the whole thing in one day.




    But some questions:

    Do you plan to get significantly stronger from this regimen? [your body weight exercises limit your strength gains.]

    Do you plan to hit the ball harder from this regimen? [a lack of medicine ball throws limits power generation progress.]

    Do you plan to move better on the court from this regimen? [aside from suicide drills, I see no agility training.]

    Why no shoulder and forearm program to prevent the all-too-common shoulder, elbow and wrist problems that plague tennis players?
     
    #18
  19. Standstill

    Standstill Rookie

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    I think in the ideal world in my head I planned to do it everyday, and then wake up bright and early the next morning to do it again as if nothing happened :p

    In reference to the questions Charlie, I think that showcases very well how we don't really know what we're doing. We kind of just picked up every exercise we could think of, mostly bodyweight, and said "let's do everything, it'll make us good tennis players!!!"

    Your help is so very welcomed and loved. I think it would be awesome if we could collaborate with the experts on this forum to create the perfect program :)
     
    #19
  20. maverick66

    maverick66 Hall of Fame

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    buy a book or find a quality website and copy their program. Its safer and easier to figure out.
     
    #20
  21. charliefedererer

    charliefedererer Legend

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    ^^^I agree with maverick66. That's why I posted above about potentially buying those two books from very well known and respected tennis trainers.

    But I also don't want to be overly discouraging about your initial workout plan.

    Your enthusiasm really is so refreshing in this day and age where too many are afraid of putting in the effort of hard work.

    You may be very happy just doing your own regimen, and getting as much out of it as possible.

    But you may also decide that doing a little research can build you a program that would yield better results if you stick to it.

    Ahh ... but that "sticking to it" is the problem. If it turns out to be a program that you don't have a zeal for, it is unlikely you will stay with it.

    That's why a review of the type of program by Donald Chu is something you may want to take a look at, but ultimately decide it is not for you, or maybe you will be impressed from the information about how to "best" devote your time and energy in training that you will embrace the regimen all the more, "knowing" you are on the right path. You are the one to decide.

    Just in giving you more information, Donald divides his 12 week strenuous workout program into 3 blocks of 4 weeks.
    The first block emphasizes strength and endurance.
    The second block emphasizes strength workouts.
    The third block emphasizes power workouts.

    All three blocks include an abdominal circuit, court drills, medicine ball routines, plyometrics, weight training, and wrist/forearm work.

    The workout regimens are clearly defined, and change on different days of the week.



    Now, you may decide you don't like this plan at all. You may decide you want to eliminate certain aspects of the training.

    But it may still do you well to read the opinions of respected trainers on why they have chosen their regimens.


    As for the "why" to exercise in particular ways, Tennis Training Enhancing On-Court Performance by Kovacs/Chandler/Chandler, definitely goes deeper into the reasoning behind regimens, and gives plenty of good adviced on nutrition, hydration, and the importance of rest to recover and then be fully ready to perform maximally again.
    There are also detailed regimens for national junior/college level training, although the organization of the different training (agility drills, weight power programs) is not done in specific "block" fashion as Chu does in his book.


    This is already a long post, and yet you can see I have provided no details for a workout regimen. To do so would take many pages, and the "why's" and details are the subject of books, not of posts. So your first decision is whether it is worth it to invest in money and time to review this material and see if it for you.



    Meanwhile, you can gain valuable insight into tennis training just by reviewing the information and regimens available on Sports Fitness Advisor Tennis Training Program: http://www.sport-fitness-advisor.com/tennis-training.htmlb
    (The problem is that the different progams aren't coordinated with each other into different "blocks" like in the book by Chu.)

    "Tennis Training Programs & Articles

    The Sport-Specific Approach to Strength Training Programs
    Strength training for sport is very different than simply lifting weights. The only goal of tennis strength program is to improve performance not to lift heavier and heavier weights...

    How To Design Resistance Training Programs For sport
    This complete guide covers the various design elements of a successful, sport-specific strength training regimen...

    The Elite Approach to Tennis Strength Training
    Strength conditioning is essential for all levels of tennis players. Here's exactly how should put together a tennis-specific strength taining program...

    A Complete Tennis Weight Training Routine
    Here's some tennis-specific weight training routines with sets and reps. Be sure to read the article above first though...

    Power Training For Sport
    Many athletes require explosive power to be successful in their sport. Once maximal strength strength has been developed there are several methods to convert it into sport-specific power...

    Plyometric Training for Sport-Specific Power
    This article outlines the basics - sets, repetitions, rest intervals, exercise selection saftey considerations - for putting together an effective plyometric training session. It includes a sample session for tennis...

    Muscular Endurance Training
    Tennis requires both power and strength endurance. This article covers how to develop the latter...

    Interval Training for Sport-Specific Endurance
    Interval training is more demanding than continuous type training and brings about different adaptations. It is also more suitable for multi-sprint sports such as tennis...

    Agility & Quickness Exercises
    Agility training helps tennis players to move around the court quickly and reach more shots...

    Ladder Agility Drills for Quick Feet & Coordination
    Speed ladders are a simple yet effective tool for developing agility. Use these drills within your tennis training program to improve your foot speed and coordination...

    Flexibility Exercises
    Good flexibility is important in most sports, not least tennis. Use theses stretching exercises after a game or tennis training session to increase your range of motion...

    Forearm & Rotator Cuff Exercises
    Help to prevent overuse injuries such as tennis elbow with these simple exercises... "
     
    #21
  22. Standstill

    Standstill Rookie

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    Charlie, you are so wonderful. Thank you so much!
     
    #22
  23. r2473

    r2473 Legend

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    ^^ How are you typing AND working out at the same time?

    I don't see any break plan in your schedule at the time it says you made that last post.

    Something funny is going on here............
     
    #23
  24. Standstill

    Standstill Rookie

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    Sorry man, this plan is for the summer! We're not there yet
     
    #24
  25. charliefedererer

    charliefedererer Legend

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    You stated right from the start that your plan was for the summer.

    But if you can get started on any strength work now, your tendons, ligaments, and muscles will all be stronger to let you train harder without breaking down. (You may have already started - you don't say.)

    The thrower's ten exercises certainly won't tire you out, and reps can serve as breaks while studying. (Same for body weight exercises, or even some lifting, you might get started with now.)
     
    #25
  26. Anton

    Anton Hall of Fame

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    Isn't summer for blunts, 40s and b*tches?
     
    #26
  27. maverick66

    maverick66 Hall of Fame

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    Why wait?

    Charlie has given you some solid info and you can start really building your fitness base right now so you can focus on more court time in the summer. Especially if you plan on playing tournies and have to ease off the fitness on weeks of tournies. If you are not hitting as much now or playing as many matches this is the time to really hammer the fitness so when the summer comes and you wann put in 4 hours of hitting in a day you have the physical level to do so.
     
    #27
  28. Standstill

    Standstill Rookie

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    Yes sir, and I understand all that.

    My bud and I go to a very difficult private school where homework takes up most of our nights. On top of that, we're playing tennis mostly everyday in addition to playing on our school's tennis team. So we're getting our reps in, so to speak.

    You're right, though, and we should try to start working out when we can on the weekends.

    This coming spring break we're going to run through the program a couple of times. To see if it's do-able, first off, and then to tweak it according to what we need and the sage advice you geniuses bestow upon us. : )
     
    #28
  29. maverick66

    maverick66 Hall of Fame

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    So I am guessing with team going on you are playing matches right now?

    This is part of learning the tennis process. learning when to turn up the fitness and when to taper back on your schedule. Takes time to learn and you will get there.

    It also depends on what your needs are. If you feel fitness is what is holding you back on the court than down some court time and focus on fitness. If you feel you need more court time than use it and scale back the fitness. Its about finding the right balance. That is something that might take you some time to do but when you do it will maximize your development as a player.
     
    #29
  30. Clemsonfan

    Clemsonfan New User

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    Plenty of good suggestions have been made. One more would be www.core performance.com/tennis/. You can plug in the days and hours you can work out each week and will design a program for you. In addition, they will schedule regeneration, or down time, so that your body can heal and recover from prior workouts.

    Good luck in your season and next summer when you start.
     
    #30
  31. Champs990411

    Champs990411 Rookie

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    How did this go?
     
    #31
  32. USERNAME

    USERNAME Professional

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    This'll work... If you do it once a week. Pro X-Fit guys don't do that much in a day.
     
    #32
  33. chess9

    chess9 Hall of Fame

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    Terrible idea from an exercise physiology standpoint, but it looks fun and a lot like something I did in college. If you aren't a pro fun is the name of the game. Go for it!
     
    #33

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