Staple Gun

Discussion in 'Other Equipment' started by Muppet, Dec 7, 2012.

  1. Muppet

    Muppet Hall of Fame

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    Is there a special type of staple gun, with smaller staples, that I should use to affix a leather grip to the handle? Or is a regular staple gun used for this? The staple that Dunlop used for the factory grip is very small, and I don't know where to look for staples that small. For that matter, what size staples should I get?

    All help is appreciated.
     
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  2. makinao

    makinao Rookie

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    I've used everything from my trusty Arrow T-50 to tiny office staplers. As long as it is flush to the grip and secures it, its OK
     
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  3. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    Every racket in the old daze, wood and under 80 sq inch, used a small nail tack to start the grip. About 1/4" long with a flat head.....
     
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  4. Muppet

    Muppet Hall of Fame

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    I think I'll be spending less on this staple gun than I had planned.
     
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  5. Lakers4Life

    Lakers4Life Hall of Fame

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    In order to pass the CRT/MRT test you must use a staple gun to attach a replacement grip to the handle.

    Personally I don't use a staple. The double sided tape on the girp works fine, if make sure the pallet is clean before starting. If a staple had to be used, I would re-use the original staple and use the same holes it was pulled from. It can easily be held with needle nose pliers and tacked back in with a tack hammer.
     
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  6. COPEY

    COPEY Hall of Fame

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    ^^Yep, I stopped using a staple years ago and so far I've yet to have one come off on me. Adding to what Lakers said, if you apply adequate tension as you completely overlap the first wrap, that coupled with the adhesive will secure the grip.

    Of course, if you're testing for certification, then yes, use a staple.
     
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  7. Geoff

    Geoff Professional

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    Hansen Tacker

    The Hansen Tacker in my opinion is the best stapler for applying leather grips and butt caps. I have had mine for over 35 years. Here is the link http://www.hansentacker.com/default.htm
     
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  8. Muppet

    Muppet Hall of Fame

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    I got an Arrow light weight staple gun for just under $10. I also got a box of 1/4" deep staples that are compatible with it. My leather grip is arriving on Tuesday. I got the Becker one from TW because it's thicker and I need to build up the grip a bit. I'll put a Gamma Supreme OG over that.
     
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  9. zapvor

    zapvor Legend

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    i didnt know this. interesting. i just wrap it around and so far so good
     
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  10. goran_ace

    goran_ace Hall of Fame

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    When I worked at a club, our head pro (who was an MRT) required grips to be tacked or stapled at the end and also a counter wrap of double-sided tape on the handle because we guaranteed our work for the life of the grip. It is definitely overkill but it only takes an extra minute or two and doesn't really cost anything. Members/customers appreciated seeing the extra effort and care to justify paying the service charge for 5 total minutes of work to re-grip.

    I have an electric staple gun that accepts different types of staples. I use office/light duty for the starting end of grips and something heavier duty for butt caps.
     
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  11. Muppet

    Muppet Hall of Fame

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    Not as difficult as I thought. I had to use two staples because the first one was crooked. Neither staple sank flush, so I tapped them down with a hammer. Then I took off the backing for the adhesive as I went, carefully overlapping just a bit and pulling some tension as I went. At the end, I didn't have a proper tool to give the leather a tapered finish, so I used extra finishing tape to cover it. I was putting an overgrip on it anyways. It came out looking and feeling very good. It will be easy enough to go back and finish the leather properly if I want to. There's enough slack left at the top. What kind of tool do you use to cut leather cleanly?
     
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  12. goran_ace

    goran_ace Hall of Fame

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    Utility shears (aka bandage shears). Also use these to cut out string. Works great, effortless.
     
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  13. Muppet

    Muppet Hall of Fame

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    Thanks goran. I can get those at the medical supply store down the street.
     
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  14. goran_ace

    goran_ace Hall of Fame

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    Another good 'tool' to have around is a pen or a pencil. A rookie mistake is to trim/taper the end of the grip before wrapping and then attempting to wrap that grip so it creates a straight edge at the top. If you want a nice straight edge at the top, best method is to wrap the untrimmed grip all the way to the top, then mark with a pen where you want the edge to be, unwrap that section and trim.
     
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  15. Muppet

    Muppet Hall of Fame

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    Alpha sold me a pair of shears to cut out my stringbeds when I bought my stringer. Could that be the same tool that you're talking about? I can't find a picture of them. I know, I'll see how they do on the extra piece of scrap leather that's in my basket.
     
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  16. goran_ace

    goran_ace Hall of Fame

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    This is what I am talking about.

    [​IMG]
     
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  17. kopfan

    kopfan Rookie

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    I have this.. but was meant to cut bandage and tape. Sharp enough to shear thick clothing, leather and thick tough tape.
     
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  18. Muppet

    Muppet Hall of Fame

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    The shears I have are a little cheaper in quality, but they cut through the leather and the overgrip very well. Well, it's good to know that I can cut heavy materials cleanly now. Thank you all for your input.
     
    Last edited: Dec 13, 2012
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  19. maxpower

    maxpower New User

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    I recently replaced the leather grip on my babolat pure storm Ltd. While i didn't have too much trouble, being left handed forced me to cut an angle to begin the job and thus didn't have a clean start. Are there any tips any one may know of for left handed grips?
     
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  20. Relinquis

    Relinquis Hall of Fame

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    i'm not a racquet pro. i just wrap the replacement grip with a bit of tension in the beginning no staples. has worked fine for me so far.

    i haven't put on a leather grip yet though, will see how that works on my next racquet.
     
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  21. mikeler

    mikeler G.O.A.T.

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    I do the same thing.
     
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  22. Lakers4Life

    Lakers4Life Hall of Fame

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    I was at Home Depot the other night, and they had Husky brand Titanium Coated Scissors for $7. One was slightly bent, for cutting string beds, and the other straight for trimming grips.

    If you use an overwrap, just wrap that left handed. I don't think you can feel the grip with an over wrap, the important thing is to keep the bevels. If you don't use an overwrap, then you would have to put an opposite angle cut at the start and wrap left handed.
     
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