Stats for 1989 USO final (Becker-Lendl)

Discussion in 'Former Pro Player Talk' started by krosero, May 2, 2008.

  1. krosero

    krosero Legend

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    Becker d. Lendl 7-6 (2), 1-6, 6-3, 7-6 (4)

    The match lasted 3 hours 51 minutes – an hour less than each of the U.S. Open finals between Lendl and Wilander. Had it gone five sets it would have equaled them.

    Becker had won their last three meetings, including five-set matches at the Masters and Wimbledon.

    Since they played two tiebreaks in this match, their USO record in tiebreaks coming into the final is interesting: 18-3 for Lendl, 6-3 for Becker.

    Conditions at the start of the final were 93 degrees, with humidity at 67%. One courtside thermometer read 115 degrees. The 1988 final had started at only 72 degrees with 48% humidity.

    Becker was 21, Lendl 29.

    This was Lendl’s 8th consecutive final here (matching Tilden’s streak), and his last. In 1990 Sampras broke the streak.

    Becker had beaten Rostagno with a let-cord winner on Rostagno's match point, in the second round.

    According to CBS Lendl had been broken 10 times before the final – 7 times in a five-setter with Chesnokov (a very exciting fifth set under lights).


    My stats

    (I'm missing one point won by Lendl).

    Becker had 22 clean winners apart from service: 4 FH, 2 BH, 4 FHV, 11 BHV, 1 overhead.

    Lendl had 33 clean winners apart from service: 15 FH, 10 BH, 4 FHV, 2 BHV, 2 overheads.

    Becker's winners by set: 6, 2, 5, 9
    Lendl's winners by set: 11, 5, 7, 10

    I’ve never seen a stat like Becker’s in the first set: 6 winning backhand volleys and no other clean winners of any kind (other than aces).

    I have Becker at 15 volley winners (and 1 smash) for the whole match.

    Becker had 1 service return winner (off a second serve), no passing shots, and no lob winners.

    Lendl had 5 service return winners, all passes. He had 16 passing shots that were not returns: 10 forehands and 6 backhands.

    The match had fewer winners than the five-set final the previous year, when Wilander finished with 33 and Lendl with 81.

    Becker had 10 aces and 11 doubles.
    Lendl had 4 aces and 6 doubles.


    STATS IN THE MEDIA

    Per the W. Post and Chicago Sun-Times, Becker had 11 aces and 23 other service winners, Lendl 5 aces and 14 service winners.

    Becker and Lendl each had 43 unforced errors, per the Miami Herald.

    CBS has Becker's service percentage in the first three sets at 54, 40, and 53.
    The network put Lendl at 58, 61, and 75.

    For the whole match, Becker won 77% of his first-serve points, Lendl 63% (Philadelphia Inquirer).

    Per CBS, Becker was at 39% on second serve at 4-3 in the fourth, a remarkable stat for the winner – especially considering that Lendl was at 69% only a few games before.

    Each man won 134 points overall, per the Miami Herald. Each won 143, per the LA Times.

    At 4-3 in the fourth set, CBS had Becker winning 45 of 83 approaches.

    So Becker was not approaching quite as much as Wilander the year before. He would have needed to approach a total of 93 times to equal Wilander’s ultimate rate of approaches per game (Wilander approached 131 times per Steve Flink).

    For the whole match, Becker won 55 of 104 approaches, per the Philadelphia Inquirer.
     
    Last edited: Nov 22, 2009
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  2. krosero

    krosero Legend

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    Forgot this: Becker won 5 of 12 break points, Lendl 6 of 11.
     
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  3. krosero

    krosero Legend

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    In the LA Times:

    It's interesting, if you just look at winners and unforced errors, you can't tell why Becker won. They're tied in unforced errors and overall points won, and Lendl leads in non-service winners, 36 to 22.

    Somewhere Becker made up that gap, but it wasn't in aces, because he had 11 aces and 11 doubles.

    The only remaining category is forced errors. I didn't find any full stat on those, but some are there, in the form of service winners. Becker does have an edge in those, as noted above, 23 to 14.

    Not a surprise, then: Becker won because he had a more powerful serve, and because he won two close sets in tiebreaks.
     
    Last edited: May 12, 2008
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  4. Moose Malloy

    Moose Malloy Legend

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    They played a 5 hour match at the '92 USO. Mac was doing guest commentary & said the umpire wasn't enforcing the time rules.

    I wonder how often Lendl led Becker in non service winners in their matches(since he did in the '91 AO final as well, & possibly in the '86 W final, judging by mid match stats) Guess it was just about the big points when these 2 played, for the most part.
     
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  5. big ted

    big ted Hall of Fame

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    thats true big points.. u can win a match and still be behind in all stats, total points won, etc... i.e. by winning - 7-6, 0-6, 7-6
     
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  6. krosero

    krosero Legend

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    This stat of mine in the original post actually came from the Miami Herald, and it's different from the LA Times article I quoted later, in which each man won 143 points (possible typo?).

     
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  7. krosero

    krosero Legend

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    ESPN had them running very close in the 1988 Masters final.

    2nd set:
    Becker 17 winners, 5 aces, 16 ue
    Lendl 16 winners, 3 aces, 10 ue

    3rd set:
    Becker 6 winners, 2 aces, 17 ue, 2 doubles
    Lendl 6 winners, 1 ace, 8 ue, 1 double

    So Becker was keeping pace in the winners, was slightly ahead in aces, but was falling behind in errors.

    At 3-1 in the third, he had a total of 40 ue, Lendl just 28.

    So again Becker had a deficit, and again he made it up, because for the match he won 164 pts. to Lendl's 162.

    I think he made it up in aces, service winners, and other unreturned serves. In the USO final there's that stat in which he's ahead in service winners. At the Masters he started to pull away in aces, 12 vs. Lendl's 5, as of 3-love in the fourth.

    And service was a big difference in the 86 W final.

    So I don't disagree that Becker won these matches by winning the big points, but often what he did on a big point was lay down an unreturnable serve.
     
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  8. Tshooter

    Tshooter Hall of Fame

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    "Becker had beaten Rostagno with a let-cord winner on Rostagno's match point, in the second round. "

    Yup, that will forever be Rostagno's tennis footnote.
     
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  9. krosero

    krosero Legend

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    Boxscore in USA Today

    Match statistics

    The box score of No. 2 Boris Becker's 7-6 (7-2), 1-6, 6-3, 7-6 (7-4) victory against No. 1 Ivan Lendl in the U.S. Open championship final match.

    Becker Lendl
    First serve pct. 55 63
    Aces 11 5
    Service winners 23 14
    Double faults 11 5
    Placement winners 27 40
    Unforced errors 43 43
    Service games held 14 15
    Service games broken 6 5
    Total points 134 134
    Approaches to net 104 17
    Points won at net 55 13
    Time of match ... 3:51
     
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  10. krosero

    krosero Legend

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    Funny that the New York Times had a recent article explaining this, with Becker-Lendl as an example:

    The numbers for Becker-Lendl are the same as in the boxscore, except the total points won, which agree instead with the LA Times.

    The "outright winners" listed for Federer-Nadal are new to me because last summer the media was reporting 60 for Nadal and 89 for Federer, e.g., the Erie Times:

    Officially Nadal had 6 aces, Federer 25, so taking those out leaves Nadal trailing in winners by 54-64, lining up with the "outright winners" in the Times article.

    That article may not have been working with 60 total winners for Nadal because it drops his official aces from 6 to 5 (as if the official stats had been corrected in the days after the match).
     
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  11. heathcliff

    heathcliff Rookie

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    funny, before that final both players had had the same grand slam run that year.
    both had won one (lendl: aus-open; becker: wimbledon)
    both had made one semis (lendl: wimbledon, becker: french open)
    both had been dismissen in the 4th rd (lendl: french open; becker aus-open)
    and finally both had reach this us-open-final...
    so the true no 1 and 2 met here
     
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  12. krosero

    krosero Legend

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    Additional stats

    Points won on serve:

    Becker 77% on 1st serve (61/79) and 39% on 2nd (25/64).
    Lendl 63% on 1st serve (50/79) and 59% on 2nd (27/46).

    In rallies of 2 or more good shots:

    Becker 51% on first serve (19/37) and 38% on second (17/45).
    Lendl 51% on first serve (30/59) and 63% on second (22/35).

    Lendl did better when his second serve was successfully returned, compared to when his first serve was returned.
     
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  13. pmerk34

    pmerk34 Legend

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    Saw it on TV in 1989. Wasn't a great match by any stretch. Both played poorly. Becker won because his power bothered Ivan. IF it is ever on Tennis Rewind I probabaly wouldn't watch it.
     
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  14. krosero

    krosero Legend

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    I'd agree that neither one played at his peak potential. And statistically, they had more errors than winners.

    Including service winners, I'd put Becker at a total of 37 winners, Lendl at 38. And each man was credited with 43 unforced errors.

    Their '92 meeting has better numbers -- especially in Lendl's case.

    Per the NY Times, Lendl had 68 winners and 38 unforced errors. Becker had 65 winners and 65 unforced errors.

    So Lendl's winner/error differential was superb. Becker’s differential was zero, better than what he had in '89 but still so far below Lendl's that you wonder how Becker pushed the match to five sets. Becker must have won many points in the category of forced errors (the same thing we said upthread about the '89 match).

    In '92, after 3 sets, USA had Lendl at 38 winners and 23 ue. Becker had a slightly positive differential (43w, 40 ue), and he was up two sets to one.
     
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  15. pc1

    pc1 Legend

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    It's almost unreal how well Becker played Lendl in majors and yet Lendl beat Becker overall slightly more than Becker beat him.

    I would guess that Becker made up for the lesser winner/error differential by playing the pressure points better and winning the close games? Would you say that was true?
     
    Last edited: Oct 17, 2011
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  16. Datacipher

    Datacipher Banned

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    Whether or not the stats reflect it, I think besides Becker's mental strength, Lendl showed some weakness there. To me, it was a reminder of earlier days when Lendl was perhaps a bit shaky mentally (though it's a bit overblown I think...he faced some fierce players early on). Lendl truly knew he was genuinely threatened by Becker (that Becker knew he could beat him,t hat Becker deep down thought he was the favorite, and that Becker could dictate who won and who lost) ....something he didn't have to face during his salad days of total domination.....in that sense, it is a bit like Federer and Nadal.


    PS. Nice that Kros noted the Chesnokov match....that was the first match where I truly realized how tough the stone-faced Chezzy could be.
     
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  17. krosero

    krosero Legend

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    I'd say from '88 onwards it seemed to be true. In this '92 match Becker lost the second set decisively and was unable to break Lendl in the last two sets -- but he won two tiebreak sets (just like in '89). That was one way that Becker hung in, by winning tiebreaks. And playing well in tiebreaks is often thought of as "clutch."

    (Federer hung in his Wimbledon finals in a similar way. He won both tiebreaks in '07, both in '08, both in '09. The only tiebreak he's lost in a Wimbledon final was in '06, to Nadal).

    But there still must be something going on in the forced error category, because Becker's winner/UE differential was 30 points behind Lendl's. I doubt Lendl actually won 30 points more than Becker. And a 30-point gap can't be explained just by talking about the few key points in a match (esp. because Lendl won at least his share of those: he obviously won the most important points in three out of the five sets). That's why I talk about a pattern there seems to be in their matches, where Becker seems to have an edge in the "invisible" category of forced errors. He did often force errors with his serve, no doubt.
     
    Last edited: Oct 17, 2011
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  18. borg number one

    borg number one Legend

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    Thanks for the great thread, as always. Also, thanks for all the great videos. On this match in particular, I can't get over the dives at net on a hard court! Becker on this day just had too much for Lendl, who didn't look to be playing badly. You even see Lendl being demonstrative after a passing shot during the match, yet as has been rightly pointed out, Becker played the big points better on this day and won the '89 US Open title.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nQBKLoKpIp8 (Becker vs. Rostagno)

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8f4zvDgOfvY (Becker vs. Lendl)
     
    Last edited: Oct 17, 2011
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  19. borg number one

    borg number one Legend

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  20. krosero

    krosero Legend

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    Becker served on 143 points, and 50 serves did not come back: 35.0%
    Lendl served on 125 points, and 25 serves did not come back: 20.0%
     
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  21. krosero

    krosero Legend

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    Becker made 11 straight first serves late in the fourth set, running through the first point of the tiebreak. It was the longest streak in the match.

    Becker made 7 of 11 first serves in the tiebreaks (64%). By tiebreak:

    4 of 5 (no mini-breaks on first or second)
    3 of 6

    Lendl made 6 of 9 first serves in the tiebreaks (67%). By tiebreak:

    2 of 4
    4 of 5

    Becker made his first serve on 6 of 11 break points (55%). He was broken three times on first serve, three times on second.

    Lendl made his first serve on 6 of 12 break points (missing on his first four). He was broken twice on second serve and then three times (consecutively) on first serve.
     
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