Stretching: the truth of the matter. (with poll!)

Discussion in 'Health & Fitness' started by TimeSpiral, Oct 16, 2013.

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Regarding your pre-match routine. Check all that apply:

  1. I do static stretches before the match.

    11.9%
  2. I do dynamic stretches before the match.

    37.3%
  3. I do both, static and dynamic before the match.

    16.4%
  4. I do an aerobic warm-up before the match.

    29.9%
  5. I do NOT do an aerobic warm-up before the match.

    11.9%
  6. I do not stretch before the match.

    26.9%
  7. This is a topic I do not care about.

    6.0%
Multiple votes are allowed.
  1. TimeSpiral

    TimeSpiral Professional

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    We've all seen it, and we've all done it: the stretch routine before a match. But are you doing more harm than good?

    Old ways die hard, some say, and it would appear that stretching is one of them. A once universally held belief; that static stretching is best done prior to your workout, to ready your muscles and prevent injury; is still widely practiced among amateur athletes all around the world. But science has moved on.
    Researchers now believe that some of the more entrenched elements of many athletes’ warm-up regimens are not only a waste of time but actually bad for you. The old presumption that holding a stretch for 20 to 30 seconds — known as static stretching — primes muscles for a workout is dead wrong. It actually weakens them. In a recent study conducted at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, athletes generated less force from their leg muscles after static stretching than they did after not stretching at all. Other studies have found that this stretching decreases muscle strength by as much as 30 percent.

    Source ...
    The article goes on to suggest best practices specifically for tennis players warming up for a match, and how static stretches is a definite no-no. Not only does it weaken your muscles by up to 30%, but it does not help to prevent injury.

    Static Stretching
    When you stretch your muscle into a pose, then hold it. Imagine standing straight-leg, bending to touch your toes, holding it, then bending a little more, holding it, and so on. This is a static stretch.

    Dynamic Stretching

    When you stretch your muscles with actions, but do not hold any specific poses. Imagine holding out your hand, palm down, and trying to kick it. This is a dynamic stretch.

    Aerobic Warm-Up
    Studies show that an aerobic warm-up is best performed prior to your dynamic stretching and workout. Aerobic essentially means a continuous elevated heart rate for a period of time. A five to ten minute warm-up is sufficient, with a 40% increase of your heart rate initially (very easy pace) to a 60% increase toward the end. Too much aerobic warm-up tires you out and provides no additional benefit.
    A well-designed warm-up starts by increasing body heat and blood flow. Warm muscles and dilated blood vessels pull oxygen from the bloodstream more efficiently and use stored muscle fuel more effectively.

    [...]

    To raise the body’s temperature, a warm-up must begin with aerobic activity, usually light jogging. Most coaches and athletes have known this for years. That’s why tennis players run around the court four or five times before a match and marathoners stride in front of the starting line. But many athletes do this portion of their warm-up too intensely or too early. A 2002 study of collegiate volleyball players found that those who’d warmed up and then sat on the bench for 30 minutes had lower backs that were stiffer than they had been before the warm-up. And a number of recent studies have demonstrated that an overly vigorous aerobic warm-up simply makes you tired. Most experts advise starting your warm-up jog at about 40 percent of your maximum heart rate (a very easy pace) and progressing to about 60 percent. The aerobic warm-up should take only 5 to 10 minutes, with a 5-minute recovery. (Sprinters require longer warm-ups, because the loads exerted on their muscles are so extreme.) Then it’s time for the most important and unorthodox part of a proper warm-up regimen, the Spider-Man and its counterparts.

    Source ...
    Just spreading the wisdom, TT.

    Play well!
     
    #1
  2. Topspin Shot

    Topspin Shot Legend

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    Before the actual hitting warmup, aerobic exercises followed by dynamic stretching is your best bet. Static stretching is best for after the match, to reduce soreness and improve flexibility. The exception is if you have another match coming up that day; if so, I wouldn't engage in any static stretching until the second match is over.
     
    #2
  3. TimeSpiral

    TimeSpiral Professional

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    So you agree with exactly what I just wrote? Lol. Just playin' with ya.
     
    #3
  4. Topspin Shot

    Topspin Shot Legend

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    Basically, but I have to sound more intelligent than just agreeing with you. :)
     
    #4
  5. SystemicAnomaly

    SystemicAnomaly G.O.A.T.

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    There really should be no problem performing static stretches after your 1st match as long as there is a gap between matches. In fact, you can perform some static stretches prior to your first match if you do so well before competition. A little bit of mild static stretching might be ok 30 minutes prior to matchplay.

    However, an hour (or more) prior to matchplay is usually suggested for a moderate static stretching routine. Some players will perform a static stretch before heading over to the courts, and then perform a dynamic warmup at the courts.
     
    #5
  6. TimeSpiral

    TimeSpiral Professional

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    Hahaha, lulz. Well played.

    But you wouldn't be agreeing with me. I didn't come up with any of those principles. I'm just communicating!
     
    #6
  7. TimeSpiral

    TimeSpiral Professional

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    It's true that your muscles weaken for about 30 minutes after static stretches, and that after 30 minutes those effects should be gone, but why would you suggest static stretching 30 minutes or more before a match? There appears to be no benefits to doing this. Why not just follow scientifically supported guidelines instead?

    I know you've been coaching for 20+ years, so perhaps this is an old habit dying hard? :twisted:
     
    #7
  8. easywin

    easywin Rookie

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    I was never the guy for stretching because I'm quite tall and quite unflexible but still never hurt myself not stretching ... well until this summer when I tore my ligaments in my ankle twice in a row :)

    Of course I always knew about the importance of stretching but I had to learn it the hard way :twisted:
     
    #8
  9. GuyClinch

    GuyClinch Hall of Fame

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    Just some dynamic stretches before the match for me. I play mini tennis and light loopy rallies to warm up - that's fine.

    I know you are suppose to stretch out after your match but I never do - and I don't know anyone else who does either.
     
    #9
  10. SystemicAnomaly

    SystemicAnomaly G.O.A.T.

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    Nope, not a matter of old habits dying hard. Just the opposite, in fact. A decade ago I might have insisted that only dynamic stretches should be performed prior to exercise/competition. I have since modified/refined my thinking on this. Particularly, since a number of experts have indicated that we may be misinterpreting, in part, the real world applications of theese scientific studies.

    I was actually aware (more than 2 decades ago) that some studies done in the 80s & early 90s that suggested that many long held notions of pre-exercise static stretching might be in error. In the early 90s, there was a fledgling school of thought that post-exercise stretching was probably more important than pre-exercise stretching. (However, I was not aware or the idea of dynamic stretching back then).

    Further studies in the 90s appeared to indicate that static stretching prior to exercise did not seem to prevent injuries (or delayed-onset soreness). Some studies suggested that static stretches just prior to exercise might even promote injuries in some cases rather than prevent them. Studies were also showing that static stretching appeared to degrade muscle performance for some time (usually for 30-60 mins). Both muscle speed and muscle strength appeared to be diminished.

    The idea of dynamic stretching or a dynamic warmup started to become popular some 10-15 yrs ago. However, in the past decade there appears to be a backlash by some stretching experts. Some suggest that static stretches can or even should be performed 30-60 mins prior to exercise or competition. Most of these experts still hold to the notion that the warmup just prior to wamup should be dynamic, not static.

    Static stretching is currently viewed by many experts as producing primarily long-term benefits and does not seem to offer many short term benefits when performed before exercise. The experts are not all in total agreement on the real world applications of what the studies in the past few decades have been telling us. Some feel that static stretches 1 hour or so prior to excercise or competion could have some benefit in some/many cases. Age or particularly tight muscles/joints might be a factor.

    I have provides a few links in the past on these various schools of thought. I might dig try to dig them up later. In the meantime, here are a few that I just came across with a quick search...

    http://www.t-nation.com/free_online_article/most_recent/long_live_static_stretching
    http://dynamicprinciples.wordpress.com/2012/03/16/long-term-static-stretching
    http://www.exrx.net/ExInfo/Stretching.html
    .
     
    Last edited: Oct 16, 2013
    #10
  11. trader1499

    trader1499 New User

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    For me, I do stretch before a match or practice. The reason though is not to prevent injury... I do it personally because I feel more loose and ready to go. It helps my confidence when I don't feel tight and my muscles are warm.
     
    Last edited: Oct 16, 2013
    #11
  12. SystemicAnomaly

    SystemicAnomaly G.O.A.T.

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    ^ Have you tried dynamic stretches instead of static stretches? Or, as I suggested, perform your static stretches 30 mins or more before your practice/match. Follow this up with a good dynamic warmup (which would include dynamic stretches). As part of your dynamic warmup you could include arm circles, walking lunges, trunk twists, air or shadow swings and footwork patterns. Try this and you will probably feel confident and not feel tight.
    .
     
    #12
  13. Silent

    Silent Semi-Pro

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    My trainer concurs.

    Dynamic stretching before, static stretching after.

    I like to get myself sweating a bit too before getting on the court. Nothing fancy, just a few minutes on the bike.

    It activates the muscles and otherwise gets me loose and in a good state.
     
    #13
  14. Chas Tennis

    Chas Tennis Hall of Fame

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    Titin

    I am not sure of these conclusions -

    I first read about Titin a year or two ago. Before that I believed that the muscle/tendon length was determined by muscle and tendon with some murky idea of how it worked. My interpretation of new research on Titin, a giant protein molecule in each muscle cell, is that the tendon is not nearly as important. The Titin in each muscle cell (sacomere) is the most important stretch force supplier - spring. I believe that Titin is a new area of research, last 10 years.

    Also, there are joint capsules and fascia with some importance for stretching.

    Does it seem reasonable that the forces on the attachments, the bone origin and bone insertion of a muscle, should be equal? I just read in a text by Knudson that, while one might believe the forces should be equal, sometimes they are not because of the fascia. The muscles might apply some of its force to the fascia surounding the muscles and not all to the bone attachments. Does the fascia change when we do dynamic stretches? Is that always a positive thing?
     
    Last edited: Oct 16, 2013
    #14
  15. boramiNYC

    boramiNYC Hall of Fame

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    a brief whole body stretch like cats and dogs do after their nap can only help. from fingers to toes and neck and yawning as well. DJok's eye stretch is good too. 30 sec static stretches are pretty unusual stretches. you know how long of a hold that is? going thru each joint like that would take at least 10 min of focused hard work and huge waste of energy.

    you can also mix up pieces of stretches as you start playing. tying shoelace, picking up balls. stretches don't need to be that long to be fairly effective.
     
    #15
  16. Mrnoital

    Mrnoital Banned

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    My local tennis academy does not make the kids do any stretching at all. Just a couple laps around the court.

    I stretch sometimes due to ritual. I used to run a lot and would stretch very lightly beforehand but I've always thought it was more of a mental preparedness step. I definitely do not think stretching offers any actual physical benefit.
     
    #16
  17. Maximagq

    Maximagq Banned

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    Does anyone know Djokovic's stretching routines?
     
    #17
  18. boramiNYC

    boramiNYC Hall of Fame

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    ^
    no stretching routine but he does yoga every single night for at least 10 min before he goes to bed.
     
    #18
  19. Devil_dog

    Devil_dog Semi-Pro

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    After tearing both calf muscles, I always do a static stretch before and after playing. Haven't re-injured either leg since. And I also try to do a 5-10 minute mini tennis warm up before going full throttle.

    YMMV.
     
    #19
  20. Baxter

    Baxter Professional

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    I do absolutely nothing, and I play mostly singles and I'm 58. I play a 3-5 times a week and try to stay fit. I've never had a tennis injury so maybe I'm just lucky. I am always stiff in the morning but I doubt stretching would help that.
     
    #20
  21. BS. He does lots of strethcing, I have seen many videos where he is out in the park with his trainer flexing his leg over his head and other ridiculous stretches.
     
    #21
  22. Stretching after a match will definitely reduce stiffness the next morning.
    If its muscle fatigue, drink a big glass of milk after exercise!
     
    #22
  23. SystemicAnomaly

    SystemicAnomaly G.O.A.T.

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    Novak, no-doubt, is naturally very flexible. The yoga undoubtedly helps him to be even moreso. Note that yoga just prior to tennis is not advised. Quite a few yoga enthusiasts have informed me that after an extended yoga session (an hour or more?), playing a sport, like tennis, is difficult. They have indicated that it can take 2 hours or more to recover enough from the yoga to play effectively. Don't really know if all forms of yoga have this much of a (short-term) effect on athletic performance.

    Note that Novak does engage in training routine that includes both dynamic and static stretches (see 1st link below). It is highly doubtful, however, that he performs any static stretches just prior to competition.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8VWtVQmJTXk
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3jwh0GfA_eo (young RF training)
    .
     
    Last edited: Oct 17, 2013
    #23
  24. Chas Tennis

    Chas Tennis Hall of Fame

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    Last edited: Oct 17, 2013
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  25. boramiNYC

    boramiNYC Hall of Fame

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    I meant I have no info on his whole stretching routine. I'd think it's kept within his team. didn't mean he has no routine. sorry
     
    #25
  26. boramiNYC

    boramiNYC Hall of Fame

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    PNF is probably most effective and advanced stretching method available but it has some learning curve so for best results working with a knowledgeable trainer will be best. but it can be done on your own with care.

    as for the issue of soft tissue lengthening, it happens but it's not the only major changes resulting from flexibility training. for example the effectiveness of muscle control as you go near the limits of you ROM is another important aspect even without much lengthening. usually it's assumed lengthening will result in better functionality over wider ROM but that's not always the case.

    the most relevant physiological change of good stretching and repeated force loading in practice is changes in the cellular level in the soft tissue which results in more effective energy storage capability by the soft tissues in a specific direction.
     
    #26
  27. boramiNYC

    boramiNYC Hall of Fame

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    science builds very strong knowledge base within its capabilities but it's limited in its breadth to encompass everything. some people in US are trying to push back in the effort to make the public acknowledge that fact but they pick some craziest things to fight, which shows their ignorance but that doesn't mean science will solve all your problems. some of these ignorant people have capability to solve many peoples life problems like giving them jobs.
     
    #27
  28. TimeSpiral

    TimeSpiral Professional

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    Oh gawd ... Say it isn't so, Borami! Not you too!
     
    #28
  29. boramiNYC

    boramiNYC Hall of Fame

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    don't get me wrong. I'm just trying to be realistic and level headed. you'd find not many proponents of science as me. just painting all of them crazy weakens the liberal base. stay strong my friend.
     
    #29
  30. Topspin Shot

    Topspin Shot Legend

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    Oh gosh, please, please don't bring politics into Talk Tennis. I can get into political debating as much as anyone alive, and I can start promoting my views on here, which I might even get a kick out of doing, but I won't because this is a tennis forum. This place must remain a haven from political bantering.
     
    #30
  31. r2473

    r2473 Legend

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    I think that's a bit of a stretch.....
     
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  32. TimothyO

    TimothyO Hall of Fame

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    Yes, good post. You need to get the blood flowing into those large muscles and then the extremities before stretching and attempting fine yet stressful movements.

    But old habits die hard. I've told my wife this stuff and she and the ladies on her team insist on static-stretching first and warming up by starting with "mini tennis" at close range at the net. Before their large muscles are warmed up and the circulation is really going with an elevated heart rate trying trying to make small, fast, violent moves with their feet, ankles, wrists, and forearms at net. And yes, they seem to suffer a lot of injuries.
     
    #32
  33. jussumman

    jussumman Semi-Pro

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    There is just one muscle group that I stretch before playing and that's the inner thighs. I do static stretching of that one group, each side and that's that, probably takes about 1 minute total of stretching, 30 sec each side. From what I've read and experienced, very light stretching before a workout or playing is beneficial, (it's the over doing it that's bad). It's almost like waking up in the morning and just doing a full body cat stretch. It's minimal.
     
    #33
  34. Bobby Jr

    Bobby Jr Legend

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    Insofar as how tennis is played, doing some mild static stretching prior wont have the acute negative affect as explained in the study at the top of the post, at least not to any level significant enough worth worrying about.

    Tennis warm-ups are of such an ease-in nature that the negative effects of static stretching explained in the study would have worn off by the time you start a match.

    According to a writer (sports doctor) of a study underway in Australasia I have spoken to on this exact topic (he was my physician) he considered the advice of "no static stretching" more applicable to people who do sports like weight lifting where you have to walk out post-preparation and compete at near 100% capacity almost immediately. Tennis is very unlike that in nature and he thought it would have no noticeable ill-effect. Better to do any stretching than not in his mind. I tend to agree with him but, again, any personal situation/even tends to make a person believe something even if it's an outlier example not indicative of the general trends.

    Having suffered a number of mild leg injuries I am pretty particular about my warm up now and it makes a huge difference, as does doing a good warm-down after tennis. I do a mix of static and dynamic stretching prior to playing as well as a warm-up (walk/run/press-ups/burpees etc).
     
    Last edited: Oct 17, 2013
    #34
  35. WildVolley

    WildVolley Legend

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    I've got to partly disagree, but you do qualify that you're talking about "mild" static stretching. The studies I've seen show a fairly significant drop in vertical jump from static stretching. That will translate into decreased ability to cover the court. I've seen it hypothesized that the static stretch was disabling/hindering the jump reflex, which isn't something I want to do if I'm playing competitive tennis.

    And I see no offsetting benefit from the static stretching. I've seen no studies showing a statistically significant reduction in injuries from static stretching prior to competition. In fact, I believe some showed and increase in injury, but I don't think it was significant either way.

    While it is anecdotal, I stopped static stretching long ago in high school because I found it decreased my speed when running sprints. It made my coaches mad, but I just wouldn't do them.
     
    #35
  36. Gut4Tennis

    Gut4Tennis Hall of Fame

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    I prefer to make love just before a match in the parking lot as a warm up
     
    #36
  37. Bobby Jr

    Bobby Jr Legend

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    Correct, I don't do 30 second-type strenuous-hold stretching as part of warm-ups ever.

    This area is a case of the devil is in the details imo. There may be a significant reduction in power/explosiveness after lengthy static stretching, but the nature of a tennis warm-up, as I said, would render it irrelevant within X minutes (5?, 10?, 15?, 20?)

    Studies tend (i.e. the vast majority) to look at the extreme ends of a situation to highlight clear contrasts in the scale but tennis isn't down the power-lifting or 100m sprinting end of the scale, not even close, especially when you consider the length of warm-up and the likely amount of time post-stretching to when you need to be fully ready (15 minutes would be a fair minimum time-period here) to play.

    I see your point but you have to be careful of falling into thinking a lack of evidence is evidence of something. The fact studies may not show something is often an indication it's hard to qualify/quantify, not that it shows something definitively. Studying stretching-related injury rates would be insanely hard to do to a respectable scientific level. The studies I have seen have a significant opinion-based component to them, as is the nature of most athletic studies.

    I don't think long, intense static stretching is of benefit as a warm-up - but that's mainly from my own experiences - but I don't think you can extrapolate research to say light/short static-stretching causes you to be weaker or reduces your vertical jump ability because studies which looked at longer, intense stretching showed it to be the case. It's unlikely to be a linear curve from black to white/good to bad at all. And many other factors play a part like, as I mention above, the time gap between the stretching and competing or the other activities you do in between like jogging or skipping or whatever. These sort of details distinguish tennis from the activities that are studied which seems to be quite specific, instantaneous, explosive movements which I don't believe are all that applicable to a tennis warm-up and time-period situation.

    Anecdotal is the key word here. I never used to do any stretches either for tennis. I never got injured once or noticed any ill-effects (not even so much as a light muscle strain). But after an unrelated injury and a decade-long gap between playing I eventually started doing more dedicated warm-ups including static stretching and have never had an issue with that area of injury since - countering a decade of earlier ongoing issues. Without the warm-ups and stretches I do I would barely run around a court - and much of what I do is static, albeit not 30 seconds long or pushing it hard.
     
    Last edited: Oct 17, 2013
    #37
  38. RogueFLIP

    RogueFLIP Semi-Pro

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    I'm with Bobby Jr on this one.

    Remember that absence of proof doesn't mean proof of absence.

    There may be so many other factors involved from the article that may/may not pertain to recreational tennis players like us.

    I have found through my own trial and error that when I do whole body static stretches like an hour or less prior to a match it seems to throw my system off so to speak. So, if I have the time, I'll usually try to do these stretches earlier in the day or at least 2 hours prior.

    Ideally, part of my warm up routine is using a foam roller over my entire body to "wake up" the muscles and system and then I'll do a dynamic warmup. Then usually drive to the courts which is about 10-15 min away. Another little warmup in the locker room. If I still have some time and the courts are empty (usually play indoors), then I might do some light jogging, sidestepping, carioca steps, etc...

    If at any point though I feel like I would need to do a quick 30 sec stretch of a body part, I do it.

    Studies say it may not prevent injury, it may/may not decrease strength, but you know what? It feels like I need to do it, and it feels GOOD. And me feeling good will trump any "science" or "studies" out there any day of the week.

    I don't let science and studies be the end all in the process of my decision making when it comes to my body and my actions. They can be good guidelines or suggestions, but I trust my own awareness in my self to make my decisions.

    Too many times these studies and what have you are trying to extrapolate one factor in regards to injury and prevention when you can't do that in real life. Everything is all connected. Its never just about stretching.

    And don't let these studies put the fear in you either. OMG, if I stretch right before my match I might tear my achilles! :oops:

    When it comes to stretching, as long as you don't force anything you will not hurt yourself.

    Experiment on yourself with different intensities, different time frames, etc. Find out what works or doesn't work for your own body.
     
    #38
  39. comeback

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    i follow the exact guidelines of pre match dynamic warmup and post match static stretching. Part of my pre match warmup are leg swings. I balance myself with one hand on the net post and do 25-30 front leg swings, going higher with each leg as i progress. Then 25-30 side legs swings. Then some high step running in place on grass for a minute or 2 and i'm ready for the 10 minute warmup. If possible i like to hit against the wall (all shots) for 10 minutes before a match.
     
    #39
  40. Sentinel

    Sentinel Bionic Poster

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    I hope this is mixed doubles.
     
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  41. Gut4Tennis

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    whatever I can get. Sometimes just myself
     
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  42. r2473

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    #42
  43. TimeSpiral

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    #43
  44. drak

    drak Professional

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    what's the take on foam rolling BEFORE you play, I always do it in the morning and after I play, is there any research on foam rolling before a match to warmup?
     
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  45. Gut4Tennis

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    #45
  46. TimeSpiral

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    Good question. I don't know, however; I do have an anecdote.
    I don't love matches that have to be played after work. There is just something about jump starting my desk-job-ridden body after a hard day in the chair ... I detest my opponent even more. But, it's the second round of the playoffs and I've no choice but to try my best and deal with this guy.

    We've played several times. The first time I thought, "so he's a little eccentric, no biggie." The match goes on, the cursing begins, then the yelling, then the racquet throwing. "Ah, well, this guy takes this really seriously. Good for him, but it is rather rude to the other people playing." But then it was a combination of everything that started to grate on me: horrible line calls, always in his favor; extremely long lag in between points and changeovers; and of course, he was one of the first hardcore pushers I'd ever encountered in league play. Top it off with: He beat me twice in our previous two meetings.

    It's mid morning, I'm heavily amped up on the Joe and decide I want to stay limber, so I bust out the foam roller. Oh yeah. This feels great! I'm going to crack my neck.

    The sound it made, my neck cracking, was like someone with bear hands wringing a bunch of celery. That can't be good. I stand up and the muscles in my neck turn to iron rods--stiff. Super stiff. In a panic, I try and address the issue: massage, research, icey hot, and I send a preemptive message to my opponent.
    IS THERE ANY OTHER TIME WE CAN PLAY? I INJURED MYSELF AT WORK THIS MORNING. SORRY FOR THE INCONVENIENCE.
    Was I surprised when he declined my request and said we had to play or he would default me? No. I wasn't. He has more default wins than anyone in the league. Go figure, right?

    I pop some anti-inflammatory pills and work up a serious rage. Now I want blood. I concoct an "all-in" gameplan to win.

    I found the W in what was surely a thorough azz-romping. He even called me out, suggesting I was playing possum. I politely told him to go eff himself, in not so many words.

    It was a low level win, sure, but in a tournament I went on to win, so it's a story I will probably always remember. The moral? I've never laid my back on that roller again! Ha.
     
    Last edited: Oct 18, 2013
    #46
  47. drak

    drak Professional

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2004
    Messages:
    1,255
    LOL, good story, the one area I avoid rolling is the neck area, never felt that good and just seems like to much chance to hurt something. feels great on Achilles/calbes, hams and quads. lower back/piriformis area.
     
    #47
  48. Gut4Tennis

    Gut4Tennis Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Apr 2, 2013
    Messages:
    2,292
    Location:
    Tennis Court
    more more

    i demand more

    i want a short story
     
    #48
  49. TimeSpiral

    TimeSpiral Professional

    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2013
    Messages:
    1,291
    Location:
    Gotham City
    Hahaha! Thanks. I'm glad you enjoyed the story.

    There is more, actually. The next couple of matches were stories I will never forget, but come on--I'm just some guy!
     
    #49
  50. movdqa

    movdqa Legend

    Joined:
    Sep 19, 2006
    Messages:
    8,368
    I typically do a stretching and short aerobic session early in the morning and play tennis at lunchtime or later on. I generally feel much better with the stretching early morning.
     
    #50

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