String breaking?

Discussion in 'Strings' started by trplthreat, Jan 28, 2006.

  1. trplthreat

    trplthreat New User

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    Dec 29, 2005
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    Is there any correlation between playing level and durability of string? I have a mate who claims to bring numerous racquets with him every time he plays because he hits so hard that he breaks string each session. I was like that a few years ago, but as my game has matured I've saved a lot of money on stringing. Over the years, I've learned to not bash the ball every time and I get many compliments on my consistency.

    I read a thread on here a while back which read that string breaking actually indicates that you are missing the sweet spot. Can I receive the whole truth about string breaking?

    BTW, I use thick gauge strings strung at high tensions, so that may be a difference between me and my friend.
     
    #1
  2. Pomeranian

    Pomeranian Semi-Pro

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    There is a correlation between playing level and how long a string lasts if it was the same type of string, same tension, in the same racquet, and players didn't mishit. As if that would happen. If you look at where your string broke you can tell if it was a mishit or a clean shot. If the string was really worn down and the string was really thin and it broke, that means you hit the sweet spot often which is good. If you mishit a lot, it's likely it would snap before the string wears down. The string would usually snap outside of the sweet spot. Now if you can bash the ball consistantly and hit the sweetspot consistantly, say goodbye to your wallet. ;)
     
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  3. diredesire

    diredesire Super Moderator

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    I half-disagree with the above poster. Although there is somewhat of a correlation, it doesn't mean that it's causation.

    It depends on string pattern, racquet characteristics, string gauge/other characteristics, player habits and characteristics. Take for instance a 4.0 level player using a 16g syn gut in a 110 square inch frame with a 16x19 pattern that is evenly distributed throughout the frame (i.e. not especially dense in the center). This player strings at about 55 lbs. This player also hits with a full western forehand and topspinny backhand.

    Versus: 5.5 level player using a prestige mid with a 16g polyester full job that is strung at about 62 lbs. The polyester does not move as much as the syn gut due to string pattern and natural characteristics of the string. This player is not a spinny player, hits predominantly flatter shots.

    Who will break more often?

    I say the lower level player 8 times out of 10


    A shorter answer to your question would be: It depends, and not necessarily.
     
    #3
  4. ibemadskillzz

    ibemadskillzz Semi-Pro

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    if you hit the ball in the middle of the racquet everytime, the string will last longer
     
    #4
  5. Gaines Hillix

    Gaines Hillix Hall of Fame

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    I think anyone with a big serve who also hits with a lot of topspin is going to have issues with string durability regardless of their level.
     
    #5
  6. samster

    samster Legend

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    It depends on how much topspin you hit with. I rarely break strings (flat hitter).
     
    #6
  7. coach

    coach Semi-Pro

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    two guys I hit with both play with cheap syn gut, and the same Wilson 6.1 prostaff, and yet one ALWAYS breaks, the other never breaks. difference is one hits harder, with a lot of top spin(the string breaker), the other hits everything almost very flat-serve, groundstrokes. This second guy comments often as I break strings every 2-3 times we play ("I never break strings") like that's a good thing-- restrings 1/x at x-mas time. I have tried to encourage him to experiment but you can only lead a horse to water - you can't make 'em drink.
     
    #7

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