String broke at the final hole, how do I fix this?

Discussion in 'Stringing Techniques / Stringing Machines' started by Gustavo Kuerten, May 9, 2012.

  1. Gustavo Kuerten

    Gustavo Kuerten Rookie

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    [​IMG]

    It's too short to tie a knot. Don't tell me I have to start over, because then I will cry.
     
    Last edited: May 9, 2012
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  2. Ramon

    Ramon Hall of Fame

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    If the tie off is only one hole away, it looks like you might have just enough to finish it. If you have a starting clamp or a flying clamp, you should be able to use it, with a leftover piece of string, as a bridge so you have enough string to pull tension on it.
     
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  3. Wikky

    Wikky Rookie

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    pretty sure the tie off is right next to it and it definitely looks like you have enough string to at least do 1 hitch if not 2. I could explain how to do a patch job but it doesn't look like there's any need.
     
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  4. Gustavo Kuerten

    Gustavo Kuerten Rookie

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    I'm not able to get any tension on it, but that won't have much impact since it's the last cross, right? Just pulled it as tight as I could myself and squeezed one crappy knot out of it, hopefully it's good enough. Thanks!
     
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  5. jim e

    jim e Hall of Fame

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    If you have a starting clamp, you loop a scrap string through the holes of the starting clamp, use that clamp to clamp onto the short string and use the scrap string on the starting clamp to reach tension head and pull tension, then clamp off with machine clamp and tie off, when you pull tension you will get even more string to allow for tie off.All depends if you have a starting clamp. I heard of others using a scrap string to knot to short string, but that is a gamble, where a starting clamp works great in a situation like yours.
     
    Last edited: May 9, 2012
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  6. nyc

    nyc Hall of Fame

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    I hope it's your racquet and not a customer's!

    If you got a half decent knot out of it, you should be fine....
     
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  7. mikeler

    mikeler G.O.A.T.

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    If you have a starting clamp, you can use it as a bridge to pull tension. Worst case, just leave the last cross untensioned IF that is your racket. I would never leave the last cross untensioned for somebody else but I've done it on accident once or twice on my rackets and could not detect any difference in play. I hit the ball high on the stringbed and my last cross is at the bottom...
     
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  8. Irvin

    Irvin G.O.A.T.

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    There was a guy not long ago that had a thread for crimping something on the string in lieu of tying a knot. Knotless so to speak. Sounds like that is what you need. I will try to find it.
     
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  9. Gustavo Kuerten

    Gustavo Kuerten Rookie

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    Don't worry guys, it's my own! Unfortunately I didn't have a starting clamp around, so that's why I couldn't make it work.

    And yes mikeler, I once tied three knots because the string broke half way through and didn't notice any difference while playing.
     
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  10. Irvin

    Irvin G.O.A.T.

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  11. jim e

    jim e Hall of Fame

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    Without a starting clamp and too short of string to knot to scrap string to reach tension head,

    You could try and remove the one machine clamp that you do not need, as for the cross string you only need one to hold tension, take that machine clamp, increase the clamping force on it by adjusting it tighter, and clamp the short string (also if you place a 1/2 hitch knot at the end of that short string and clamp right next to that knot may even hold better) and loop a scrap string around the clamp itself a couple times and secure it to the clamp well looping it and tying it, not clamping the scrap string as you are clamping the short string with that clamp, then use both ends of that scrap string to reach tension head and try to pull tension, this should hold, be quick and reposition the machine clamp (that is presently holding tension) on other machine base and then clamp and then tie off. Its a gamble if it will hold for long amount of time, but it should hold long enough to work and end up with properly tensioned end cross string, worse thing is just restring.

    The above is just trying to improvise without having the proper tool to get the job done (starting clamp) . It will probably work, but like I said its a gamble. Its what I would do in your situation, as even though its an end cross if it was not tensioned properly it would be on my mind and I would end up cutting it out anyways. After all you want the best job done and correctly even if its your own racquet do you not? If you would not give it to a client this way, then why should you hit with a substandard job, is it not a reason to string your own racquet so you know that you have the proper job done? So why should you hit with a substandard job?? But in all honesty, I bet the above proceedure will work and solve your issue.

    One of many reasons to own a starting clamp, as they are cheap enough. Sure it is not necessary as many have said on these boards in the past, but when needed it comes in handy.For a $35-$40 investment it is well worth it. I even have 3 of them, and could not imagine stringing without one now.
     
    Last edited: May 9, 2012
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  12. mikeler

    mikeler G.O.A.T.

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    I use my starting clamp for doing crosses every string job, but it did bail me out one time when I needed it as a bridge. It is a worthwhile investment.
     
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  13. tennis_ocd

    tennis_ocd Hall of Fame

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    jim e has a great solution!
     
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  14. jim e

    jim e Hall of Fame

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    Well stringing tonight, I thought I would try the above post of mine out, and it does work perfectly. Presonally I would not want to string without a starting clamp (I even own 3 of them). I thought for a moment, that it is possible to be at a fellow stringers place and get into this senerio, so I gave this a try and it worked great using the other machine clamp as described above.

    Basically tying a scrap string secure to extra machine clamp, as you only need 1 clamp to hold that last cross, and clamp that short string,use both ends of scrap string to reach tension head and pull tension , switch machine clamp to opposite base, then clamp and tie off and Bob's your uncle.

    The hardest part is lifting off the clamp at the end to switch bases for the clamp, as the full string bed does not leave much room, I had to loosen up the throat side side arms on a 6 point for a very short time, ( a 2 point would be easier), so it can be done. Like I said before best to use a starting clamp, as they are cheap, and plenty of uses for them.In a pinch this does work.
     
    Last edited: May 9, 2012
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  15. Fearsome Forehand

    Fearsome Forehand Professional

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    Blow off the last cross. That will give you enough string. Or, use the next closest grommet as a tie off. Neither solution is ideal but those are your choices.
     
    Last edited: May 10, 2012
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  16. Irvin

    Irvin G.O.A.T.

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    Just for the fun of it I tried that on my machine and I could not get the clamp out of the base on my machine so I guess it depends on the machine you have. The clamp hits the strings and will no go up high enough. I tried to release the clamp and turn it sideways to try to force it between the mains but it still didn't work.
     
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  17. jim e

    jim e Hall of Fame

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    That was the hardest part, as I had to open the side supports on my 6 point for a brief time, to reposition the clamp, (I was able to get the clamp out once side support was opened to allow room to get clamp off base from outside of racquet), but then again since the racquet is 98% finished opening up the mounting support for a brief time should not be an issue, as well as this being a solution to a very infrequent problem that is rarely done, just in a situation like this, it does work.
     
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  18. nalvarado

    nalvarado Semi-Pro

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    I attempted Jim's solution with a gamma flying clamp a while ago to no avail. Best of luck to those who do get it to work in a pinch though.
     
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  19. Irvin

    Irvin G.O.A.T.

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    'jim e' the clamps are the Gamma are 1.5" wide. It make work on your machine but I doubt you will get it to work on the Gamma machines. Also you have to lift the Gamma clamp up about 2" above he stringbed to get it out of the base.

    You could remove the clamp base from the turn table and get it out but that's the only way. That is really not as hard as one may think.
     
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  20. jim e

    jim e Hall of Fame

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    I guess that machines are different. I would not even use this method, as I just did this to see that it could be done, as I typically use a starting clamp, but I used this one time yesterday to be sure it would work, and I was able to move the side arms out on the one end and the clamp slid out between the side support arm and the racquet, and it was an OS size racquet as well.Since the racquet was just about done, it should really not be an issue to release the side arms at that point in the job.
     
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  21. Irvin

    Irvin G.O.A.T.

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    I understand what you are saying Jim but the only way you will get them off the Gamma is to remove the clamp base (and the clamp at the same time) and remove the clamp.

    With a 90 si frame I recently picked up and I was able to get the clamp out outside the frame with the side support in. I went above the support but it was so close I used a piece of card stock to keep from scratching the frame. I tried opening the clamp but the clamp will not fit between the racket and the clamp.

    The best way on a Gamma is to take out the clamp base. There is a little plastic piece at the end of the rail. It has two screws holding it in. I leave the screws to facilitate cleaning from time to time. Just push it up with your finger slide the clamp over and take it out. Of course other machines may not be that way I am sure.
     
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  22. 000KFACTOR90000

    000KFACTOR90000 Professional

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    Best choice for your own racquet IMO then get straight online and buy a starting clamp :)
     
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