String Savers => Spin Reduction?

Discussion in 'Other Equipment' started by TennisFrkJC92, Aug 3, 2007.

  1. TennisFrkJC92

    TennisFrkJC92 Rookie

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    I tried my APDC with and without Babolat Elastocross II. I saw a noticible decrease in the topspin. Is this in my head or is this an effect of the string saver?
     
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  2. volleyman

    volleyman Semi-Pro

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    Generally, I've seen no change in spin production with the string savers I use. Just once, though, I perceived an increase in spin.
     
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  3. coach

    coach Semi-Pro

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    I concur with tennisfrk-- if you really examine the stringbed after any stringsaver is in place, it causes it to have more peaks and valleys and with that I would think that there is more places to grab the ball, leading to greater topspin
     
    Last edited: Aug 3, 2007
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  4. [K]Topspin

    [K]Topspin Guest

    I actually never noticed a difference. Maybe it was just that day. Or ... Maybe you were just swinging wrong ... again... just that day.
     
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  5. TonyB

    TonyB Hall of Fame

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    Call me crazy, but I do seem to notice an increase in spin when I install string savers. Don't know why. Maybe it helps the strings slide against each other a little better.
     
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  6. JavierLW

    JavierLW Hall of Fame

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    Spin is produced when the string moves the ball. If the string moves, then it's giving way to the ball which would sound mean that there is less spin.
     
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  7. Bud

    Bud Bionic Poster

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    The stringbed is definitely rougher (peaks and valleys) and tighter. Look at the stringbed from an angle (noticing the difference where stringsavers are and where they are not). It seems they would cause a slight spin increase.
     
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  8. Bud

    Bud Bionic Poster

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    Use at every OTHER cross

    I also notice that putting the savers every other cross works just as well as placing them at every cross. They will go twice as far, too, using this method.
     
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  9. TonyB

    TonyB Hall of Fame

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    Nice try, but no cigar. That's not what generates spin.

    Fact is, the sliding and subsequent rebound of the strings actually increases spin. That's why poly works so well for spin: the strings don't lock together until the stringbed is nearly dead. Of course, the other reason poly works so well for spin is that you have to hit harder with faster racquet head speed, so you get more inherent spin as a result. But the string movement also helps.

    Adding string savers, especially the soft Teflon type, may very well increase spin. I believe they do. Try them for yourself to see if you see a difference.
     
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  10. TenniseaWilliams

    TenniseaWilliams Professional

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    I don't think the ball slides the entire duration of the collision. Somewhere during the collision it grips, and begins to roll. There is a lot of experimental evidence that suggests that altering the friction of the stringbed can have an effect as to when in the collision the ball grips, but as long as it grips somewhere in the collision the end result is the same amount of spin produced.


    Rod Cross has a whole chapter (41) devoted to this in The Physics and Technology of Tennis, and Technical Tennis has a summary of this on pages 130 and 131. In addition there is an ITF stringing page that bluntly says "There is also no appreciable difference in spin produced by rough or smooth, low- or high-tension strings"
     
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  11. Bud

    Bud Bionic Poster

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    I wonder if the amount of topspin an opponent puts on the ball makes a difference in how much topspin you can produce (and vice versa). It seems, their topspin must be counteracted and neutralized prior to sending the ball back over the net with appreciable topspin.

    The same with a slice... does slicing a heavy topspin ball make it easier to slice or more difficult (since the rotation is in the same direction)?
     
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  12. TenniseaWilliams

    TenniseaWilliams Professional

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    Consider which would produce a higher final velocity:
    a bounced feed (very little horizontal velocity)
    a ball with pace coming at you
    a ball moving away from you in the correct final direction

    The physics would favor the ball moving away from you, but I would prefer incoming pace since it would be easier to hit harder with control.

    Above a certain incoming velocity level, my answer would be the feed, since I wouldn't have success against a ball moving faster than my ability to time the swing.
     
    Last edited: May 20, 2008
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