Stringing Ashaway

Discussion in 'Stringing Techniques / Stringing Machines' started by Phonco, Aug 20, 2010.

  1. Phonco

    Phonco Rookie

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    Hello.

    I recently ordered some Ashaway Dynamite, but it comes with 38 ft of string. So I was wondering how I should measure the string?

    I have two kFactor 95s that are 18x20 and they usually need 20ft for the mains. Since the Ashaway only comes with 38 ft, how do I do the mains for two k95s without leaving one of them short?

    Thank you.
     
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  2. Parker512

    Parker512 Guest

    Could'nt believe Ashway was'nt giving out sponsorships anymore.
     
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  3. esgee48

    esgee48 Hall of Fame

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    You could try saving a long piece of scrap string to tie to the ends of your 19' main just so you could tension them. Or you could use a flying clamp to hold them together so you could tension the last mains. Your main concern is to make sure you have enough to do the mains with enough left over for an effective patch to get to the tensioner.
     
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  4. High Roller

    High Roller Banned

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    Have you measure the string? Often, they are actually longer than the length stated on the label. Also, they will stretch. You may be OK without using a bridge.
     
    Last edited: Aug 20, 2010
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  5. Phonco

    Phonco Rookie

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    Thanks for the replies.

    I measured it, and it came out to be 38 ft like stated. I know that Multifilaments tend to stretch, but the Ashaway Dynamite is supposedly pre-stretched and with recommendations to string 10-20 percent lower. I'm afraid it may not stretch enough to leave enough to reach the tensioner.

    Has anyone successfully strung 19' of string on a 18x20 k95 or any other similar racquet?


    Oh, I recall trying to string two patches of string together to reach the tensioner, but my knot never seemed to be sufficient. Anyone got any knot techniques that will suffice? I only have two clamps, so clamping two together will not work.


    Thanks for all help.
     
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  6. Centered

    Centered Hall of Fame

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    This isn't a direct answer to your questions, but Dynamite Soft comes in 40 ft packs. I'm not sure why Ashaway decided to make regular Dynamite in the 38 ft length.
     
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  7. jim e

    jim e Hall of Fame

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    If you have a starting clamp, just use the 19' and bridge with the clamp to reach the tension head.With 6" less on each side and a starting clamp, should be no issue.
    Without a starting clamp:
    One solution may be to not cut the string at all, measure a little less than 10' for one side of the mains, when you get to the longer side tie off and cut at knot once the knot is tied. I know it would be awkwards to tie a knot with a long end of string, but there would be no waste of string on that end, and therefore just maybe enough for another set of mains.
    If you string racquets, a starting clamp is cheap enough to help you through problems like this and is well worth the very small investment of one.
     
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  8. Kevo

    Kevo Hall of Fame

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    Are you hybriding? I can string my PSLs, which are also 18x20, with 36 ft one piece using poly. I would imagine 38 ft. of Dynamite is more than enough if you string it one piece.
     
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  9. Centered

    Centered Hall of Fame

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    What about this racquet:

    PRO STAFF 6.1 CLASSIC 110

    pattern:
    18M X 19C

    Skip M Holes:
    8,10T - 8,10B

    Tie Off M:
    7B

    Start C:
    8T

    Tie Off C:
    5T - 13B

    My stringer said the 38' of Dynamite wouldn't be enough, but I've heard all sorts of incorrect things from those folks. I've been planning to get my own stringing machine because of their frequent mistakes. However, I am curious as to whether or not they're correct about this.
     
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  10. jim e

    jim e Hall of Fame

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    Length needed is:
    38' for 1 piece or
    20'x18' if 2 pc. (still only 38' total needed).

    This was from memory, so to be sure, I checked the "USRSA Digest" and verified it, and the numbers are correct.
    I really don't know why your stringer told you that??
    Next time you go there, ask them to show you the pattern in the USRSA Digest, and then point out to them, its listed as 38' both as 1 or 2 piece stringing, and what their commet is, as the digest is very accurate on its listings.
     
    Last edited: Sep 8, 2010
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  11. Centered

    Centered Hall of Fame

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    I've been told a lot of things and wasted a lot of trips. That's why I am strongly considering getting my own machine.

    Perhaps the funniest episode of them all was the racquet I had strung with VS Team that the stringer forgot to add the bottom cross to.

    But it wasn't funny. It was sad because an entire pack of VS Team 17 was wasted, along with a lot of my time (plus added stress on the frame/grommets).

    Thanks for the info, though. : )
     
    Last edited: Sep 8, 2010
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  12. jim e

    jim e Hall of Fame

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    If you get your own machine, you can learn to string consistantly, and thats what its all about, and that way, you will know it was done properly, no short cuts taken, and you can string your own when you want it.
    Sounds like the place you go to is very sloppy! Why do you continue to go back?If they return a racquet that you can see a problem, there are many more errors that you cannot see that could be done as well, so how could they be trusted.
    Get a decent machine, and over time you wil not regret it.
     
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  13. Centered

    Centered Hall of Fame

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    It's a matter of convenience and cost. I am not a string breaker and don't have much money to spend at the moment—so until recently, when I started taking friends' racquets there, I didn't think it would be worth it to have my own machine. But, I've had enough of the sloppiness.

    It used to be convenient, but now I've wasted too much time, and gas too, making trips down there to correct their errors.
    I am planning to save up a bit and do exactly that.
     
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  14. mikeler

    mikeler G.O.A.T.

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    You obviously are a detailed oriented person, so I think a stringing machine would be great for you. The drop weight machines are not that expensive and you may even be able to find a used one for even cheaper. It's nice trying out new strings and not paying for labor. If my elbow would ever get completely healed I'd still be experimenting with strings but right now the goal is just to play pain free.
     
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