Stringing on a klippermate is more annoying than I expected.

Discussion in 'Stringing Techniques / Stringing Machines' started by pmata814, Apr 22, 2013.

  1. pmata814

    pmata814 Professional

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    I don't know what to tell u. According to my fish scale, my kmate is off by 1 lb 4 oz. I dont think thats too bad though. Do you? Or maybe the fish scale IS off like you suggested.
     
    #51
  2. diredesire

    diredesire Super Moderator

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    It's just a frame of reference thing. I look at stringing from both a client and provider side. If you string for others (service provider), the last string can be an indicator of quality. I agree with you that it's more or less a non-issue for play purposes, but clients can (and have often) use(d) the "check the outer mains" as a reality check to see if you're a "good stringer' or not. It's silly, but it happens. I nitpick on these things because it matters in some scenarios. I agree with you, though. If you string for yourself, it really shouldn't make any difference (and actually might make more sense in practice -- look up proportional stringing).

    Digital fishing scales are super cheap, and it's a nice tool to have in your repertoire (<$10 online)

    That's way too logical, max ;) It's a funny thing -- as stringers, the concept of reference tension should be very intuitive, but as customers, it's not obvious that this is the case. "I've strung my racquets for 60 lbs for years! Why are your string jobs so tight/loose?!" I've found that there are just customers that really don't want to be educated.

    Note: "According to my fish scale..."

    It's entirely possible that your fish scale is offset, although accurate (linearity wise). Note that there is/was some standard that the scale was calibrated against. You should be using at least one reality check measure to confirm your scale. Generally speaking, dropweights should be VERY accurate at horizontal, within margin of manufacturing tolerance (which should translate into negligible offset). The tension pulled is simple physics -- the loss you should account for is friction loss in a frame. If you're calibrating "through" a frame (aka with a frame mounted), that could explain the difference. What's your calibration scheme/setup look like?

    [​IMG]
    With no frame

    OR
    with a frame in the machine, stringing the calibrator through the frame (mains).

    Generally, you'd calibrate without a frame, but I personally like to calibrate with a frame :) [When calibrating at a tournament, though, I'll match calibration procedures to the rest of the machines]
     
    #52
  3. pmata814

    pmata814 Professional

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    I have my scale set up WITHOUT the frame. I just mount the scale on the front post, tighten the top frame plate to secure it, and pull tension directly on a string that I have tied to the chain. My only explanation is that A.) the scale is off or B.) the sticker wasn't put on the bar perfectly. Both could be possible right? When I had the WISE tension head I seem to remember the scale was pretty much spot on. But that was years ago.
     
    #53
  4. mrw

    mrw Semi-Pro

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    I love stringing on my Klippermate. My usual procedure is to set up the racquet in the machine, pop the top of a fine IPA and focus on stringing and enjoying the IPA for around 40 minutes and bingo, a freshly strung racquet.
     
    #54
  5. max

    max Hall of Fame

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    I know what you mean. I best like to kmate early Sunday mornings, listening to news radio and casually drinking black coffee.
     
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