Stringing Tecniques

Discussion in 'Stringing Techniques / Stringing Machines' started by pkshooter, Oct 11, 2012.

  1. pkshooter

    pkshooter Semi-Pro

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    I don't understand, how you can string a racket in different ways. :confused:
    can someone explain to me the diff methods and what they do.
     
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  2. pkshooter

    pkshooter Semi-Pro

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    thank you in advance
     
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  3. drakulie

    drakulie Talk Tennis Guru

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    one piece, two piece, around the world (numerous kinds), proportional, etc, etc, etc.
     
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  4. diredesire

    diredesire Super Moderator

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    There's also the JET method that is worth at least knowing (I don't ever use it, though). With those "keywords" in mind, a search should give you a very brief overview of what they are.

    Very brief summaries:

    One Piece: One long length of string, which results in two knots.
    Two Piece: Two pieces of string, one for M, one for X: Results in 4 knots
    Proportional: Tension changes with the length of string, outside is looser. Supposedly expands the sweetspot, reduces jarring on off center strokes.
    Box: Sort of like ATW, except you make a box pattern on the frame (http://www.stringerspad.com/atwqbox.html)
    JET: Combination of Proportional and Box (like I said, simplified summary). IMHO largely marketing.

    If you want to know more than a simple summary, start using that search function, OR google (keyword site:tt.tennis-warehouse.com). I'm assuming you're not really a stringer due to your question, so if you have any specific questions about the process and how they relate to the above, please ask (specific) questions. I won't speak for everyone, but the impression I get is the techniques forum isn't really all about the traditional spoon feeding that you might get elsewhere.
     
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  5. pkshooter

    pkshooter Semi-Pro

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    No I string and I know the difference between one piece and to piece but that's it
     
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  6. Ramon

    Ramon Hall of Fame

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    Read the stickies in this forum. You can learn a lot just looking at the videos, seeing how the different string patterns are done, and listening to their explanations.
     
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  7. TimothyO

    TimothyO Hall of Fame

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    I raised a related question in this section and the string section. People are all over the map on the subject.

    Some say just string all strings a the specified reference tension.

    Others add 10% tension to 2-4 of the outside mains and 2-4 of the top and bottom crosses.

    There are the JayCee and closely related but still distinct JET method.

    There's proportional stringing which varies tension based on string length and vibration frequency.

    And lots of others. All share a common goal of a more even, longer lasting string bed with fewer hot spots and more consistent response.

    Related issues included pre-stretching gut and multis (or not) and letting polys relax several seconds before clamping off (as much as 20 seconds).

    My question, as a customer, arose due to the fact that customers who might have their stringing done by different individuals or even different shops with very different results. There's even one fellow who replied to my post who sort of dismissed the idea but then said he'll string using whatever technique a customer specs and if they don't he'll string as he does for himself...but he never explains what that way is!
     
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  8. TimothyO

    TimothyO Hall of Fame

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    When you string for pros do you just pull reference tension on each string, do soemthing else for specific strings, or use something like JET?
     
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  9. drakulie

    drakulie Talk Tennis Guru

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    No player from beginner to grand slam champion has ever mentioned the JET method to me. To be frank, I won't do it for anyone unless I'm being paid twice or even three times what I typically charge.

    Doesnt matter what pattern you use, you will ultimately end up with a string bed stiffness. The JET method doesn't come anywhere near what it claims, and is simply a variation of a proportional pattern. Period. It's a egomaniacs way of making himself feel special. Anyone can come up with a variation of a proportional pattern and name it after themsleves.
     
    Last edited: Oct 13, 2012
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  10. Squidward

    Squidward Rookie

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    One Piece (two knot), Two Piece (four knot) and ATW. Pretty much all my customers ask for and all I use.

    I've NEVER had anyone ask for a Jet or proportional stringjob...
     
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  11. pkshooter

    pkshooter Semi-Pro

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    What's atw, and is the jet method worth learning.
     
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  12. Roger Wawrinka

    Roger Wawrinka Professional

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    ^^ ATW pattern's are a way to string one piece but still being able to string the crosses from top to bottom. This is used for racquets where the mains end at the bottom of the racquet, otherwise if the mains end at the head of the racquet, you could string one piece and string top to bottom.


    I do not know if you know this but stringing bottom to top is kind of frowned upon.
     
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  13. Ramon

    Ramon Hall of Fame

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    As was mentioned before, no one is going to ask you to use the JET method. ATW is useful if you want to do one-piece patterns. Most racquets today require an ATW pattern to do a one-piece job doing the crosses from top to bottom. The reasons you might want to use one-piece include conserving string if you use reels and putting less wear on the grommets because you have only two tie-offs. I don't particularly like the traditional one-piece pattern where one of the end mains is loose because it's a tie-off while the other side is tight. I usually modify it by weaving a cross with the short side, which eliminates the unevenness.

    If you want to learn ATW, look at the videos in the stickies.
     
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  14. Roger Wawrinka

    Roger Wawrinka Professional

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    ^ That's a great idea with the one-piece string job. Using the short side to weeve a cross. I will have to try that!:)
     
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  15. Irvin

    Irvin G.O.A.T.

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    I bet you don't.

    EDIT: Try it and you'll see what I mean.
     
    Last edited: Oct 14, 2012
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  16. Irvin

    Irvin G.O.A.T.

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    Double post
     
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  17. Ramon

    Ramon Hall of Fame

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    I didn't come up with the idea myself. I got it from one of the stringing forums. It's the place with all the guts and all the glory. :lol:
     
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  18. Rabbit

    Rabbit G.O.A.T.

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    I usually try to weave the first two on the short side then tie off on the 3rd cross which is started from the long side. I like it better.
     
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  19. Ramon

    Ramon Hall of Fame

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    I've done that also. It depends on the racquet. With some racquets you have a stressful 270 degree turn if you only weave one cross with the short side. Weaving two crosses sometimes helps to spread out that stress. If you do it that way, of course, you need to reserve an extra 2 feet for the short side.
     
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  20. stringwalla

    stringwalla Rookie

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    That's how the players get it at some grand slams and other tournaments-
     
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  21. Irvin

    Irvin G.O.A.T.

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    I am assuming that is the standard one piece stringing practice at some tournaments or are you saying some players request it?
     
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  22. Rabbit

    Rabbit G.O.A.T.

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    Yeah, that's right. I don't see a way to do it with my Warrior's. Prince limits your options on the O-racquets.
     
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  23. Irvin

    Irvin G.O.A.T.

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    Rabbit there may be a way to do it you just have to think outside the box. Which Warrior do you have 100, 104, DB Team, Lite 104, or Warrior Team?
     
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  24. Irvin

    Irvin G.O.A.T.

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    I can't buy that. When the string goes through a grommet (except for O Port) it must make a 90* turn up or down the racket. Why is there more stress depending on which way it turns? The stress comes into play when after the turn it goes into another grommet too soon. If there is a short distance of the frame supporting a 90* or 270* turn you may have problems.

    Think about how rackets are constructed. There is (more often than not) a greater distance between mains and crosses as you get to the sides of the racket. The weakest part of the racket is the at the top on the shoulders where the racket is wider. (The top of the racket is usually wider than the bottom.) Therefore in the weakest part of racket is where the manufacturers increase the length of the frame between connecting grommet holes. When you starting stringing one piece, ATW patterns, and box patterns you are shortening the distance between the connecting grommets most of the time. You have to think outside the box and for each specific application determine what is best for you.

    I am not saying stringing one piece, ATW, or box is good or bad for your racket. I am not saying if you have a short distance of frame supporting the frame your racket will collapse. I am sure there have been rackets strung like this many times and they came out just fine. Some rackets (like the Wilson T series rackets) were designed to be strung like this.
     
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  25. Ramon

    Ramon Hall of Fame

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    What I'm actually doing is to address the issue you mentioned. On my PK Ki 5x, the pattern is 16x20 with skips at 8T, 8B. The mains end up at the top (bottom grommet has 8 holes). So on my particular racquet, I string the top 2 crosses with the short side. On other racquets, I don't. On my racquet, the 270 degree long side turn is less stressful when you start with the 3rd cross because the distance between holes is greater. There are other methods to get around that also, like skipping the 2nd cross and coming back to it (as long you're prepared to get through blocked holes). On a Babolat APDGT, for instance, you can do the short side by stringing 7 mains and the 2nd cross. Then you can do the long side with an ATW that includes the bottom cross, last short side main, top cross, then skips down to the 3rd cross. Every turn will have at least a 1/2" of space between holes. Don't do that with a string like RIP Control where it's a nightmare to get through blocked holes.

    I didn't want to go through all that detail when the OP admits he doesn't know much besides the difference between one and two piece. You, obviously, can think beyond that.
     
    Last edited: Oct 15, 2012
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  26. Irvin

    Irvin G.O.A.T.

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    Ramon you are 100% correct. By the same token if you have a 16 main racket that skips 7 & 9 head you could use the short side to string the top and second cross and not have a stressful turn and them use the long side to string the fourth then third crosses and not have a stressful turn there either.

    On the other hand if you use the same racket and use the long side to make a short turn from 10H to 11H (outside main to third cross) you have that short section supporting your pull on the third cross.
     
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  27. Irvin

    Irvin G.O.A.T.

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    In order to do all these non standard stringing methods which addresses the OP's original question you are sooner or later going to end up with a cross and main being held on the same side. That means you are going to have a need for a starting clamp. And if you are doing ATW patterns and you have glide bars like the NEOS 1000 or flying clamps you have even more issues. Still doable but requires other methods to do what you are trying to do.
     
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  28. Ramon

    Ramon Hall of Fame

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    Absolutely! I have a starting clamp and flying clamps in addition to the standard fixed clamps. If I don't plan ahead, I'm sk-rood!

    The safe way is two-piece. If you want to expand your horizons with variations on one-piece, you need extra clamps and you should experiment with cheap strings and old racquets first.
     
    #28
  29. Irvin

    Irvin G.O.A.T.

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    I agree with you Ramon again. I just strung a Wilson W2 Ruby Spice racket today with an ATW pattern. This racket is normally strung two piece to avoid the short frame support but this time I wanted to try ATW. Normal two piece pattern is 16x18 mains skip 6h, 8h, 10h, and 11h. Mins tie at 6t, crosses tie at 5h and 10t.

    I wanted to use the short side to do the ATW pattern and tie off the top and bottom crosses and not the outside mains. So I strung the center 12 mains and held the short side 7th main with a starting clamp. I used the long side to run the 7th outside main on the long side. Then to avoid the short section I went from the 7th main to the 4th cross with the long side (9h to 11h,) then strung the 3rd cross. Then when I run in the short Side ATW if did not want to make a short grommet connection from 8t (outside main) to 9t (bottom cross) so I skipped the 17th cross and strung the bottom cross and tied off. Then I ran the short side outside main, 17th cross, long side outside main, second cross, and finished off with the top cross and tied off. Not you normal ATW pattern but doing it this way avoided all short sections of frame supporting a pull. This method did require some planning ahead to avoid what you called being sk-rood.

    if you just follow some other ATW pattern you will have problems
     
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  30. pkshooter

    pkshooter Semi-Pro

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    No i didn't know, thanks for telling me. :shock: why is it bad to string bottom to top, does it damage the frame..
     
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  31. diredesire

    diredesire Super Moderator

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    Not really, it's just less friendly (theoretically). Some warranties will also be voided this way (supposedly), but I'm not sure I've ever actually heard of this happening from a first hand account.
     
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  32. pkshooter

    pkshooter Semi-Pro

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    ^ thank you
    Also does the JET method actually work??? There are several other kids stringing at my school so i'd like to be able to gave something to set me apart.
     
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  33. diredesire

    diredesire Super Moderator

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    Try it and find out. It has its merits, but it's largely exaggerated. IMHO it's marketing mumbo jumbo. I think you should focus on being as consistent as possible first before trying crazy patterns. I'd say if you're asking what the techniques are, you're not really ready to experiment yet. Like I said early in the thread, we shouldn't be looked at as a spoon feeding service, you need to put your time in, get many, many racquets under your belt before sweating the minutiae.

    Differentiate yourself by providing a service that's actually worth paying for, IMHO.
     
    #33
  34. Chotobaka

    Chotobaka Hall of Fame

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    ^^^^^^^^
    Very sensible advice for anyone who has enough patience to "get it".
     
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  35. pkshooter

    pkshooter Semi-Pro

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    Alrighty i won't worry about it just quite yet then.
     
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  36. Irvin

    Irvin G.O.A.T.

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    the are some aspects of the JET method that makes a lot of sense. Such as get the clamp as close to the tie off as possible and use longer lower tension pulls for poly string. Using various tensions on different string is questionable.
     
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