Stringing time-lapse

Discussion in 'Stringing Techniques / Stringing Machines' started by defrule, Aug 14, 2012.

  1. defrule

    defrule Professional

    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2009
    Messages:
    823
  2. bugeyed

    bugeyed Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2010
    Messages:
    543
    Location:
    Tx
    Interesting, but why do you clamp in the middle of the strings? I don't see how you can get proper tension that way. In fact I know you can't!. I'll let others comment on finishing half the mains before switching sides.

    Cheers,
    kev
     
    Last edited: Aug 14, 2012
  3. Irvin

    Irvin G.O.A.T.

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2007
    Messages:
    11,773
    Location:
    Marietta, Ga
    I will say your stringing method is shall we say different.
     
  4. defrule

    defrule Professional

    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2009
    Messages:
    823
    You'll also notice I don't have a starting clamp or stuff like that. Truly a novice in stringing and I don't really know what doesn't work.

    I only really string for myself and friends. We're weekend warriors so precision isn't too important.

    But do tell me what I should change.

    EDIT: Is there something wrong with doing one half of the mains first they the other half?
     
    Last edited: Aug 14, 2012
  5. seekay

    seekay Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Dec 9, 2011
    Messages:
    433
    Location:
    Champaign, IL
    Two things stand out to me:

    1. It's best to clamp as close as you can to the tension head.

    2. USRSA recommends to never let one side of the mains get more than three pulls ahead of the other. I go two ahead on one side, and then string four on the other (two to catch up, two to go ahead) and repeat until I'm out of mains.
     
  6. bugeyed

    bugeyed Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2010
    Messages:
    543
    Location:
    Tx
    Most prefer to do 4 mains on one side then finish the other side & come back & finish the first side. Others alternate, but I think the 4, then switch method is approved. It helps balance stress on the frame compared to finishing one side first.
    I would also recommend you clamp the strings as close to the frame as possible, on the side of the pull. You will get a more uniform tension in the racquet.
    Otherwise it looks like you have it down.
    Cheers,
    kev
     
  7. dak95_00

    dak95_00 Professional

    Joined:
    Sep 9, 2007
    Messages:
    838
    Location:
    Columbus, OH
    I'm surprised no one said anything about starting the crosses from the throat instead of the top. I thought that was a NO-NO.
     
  8. zapvor

    zapvor Legend

    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2006
    Messages:
    9,077
    Location:
    tennis courts
    i didnt watch the vid but some rackets allow it.
     
  9. seekay

    seekay Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Dec 9, 2011
    Messages:
    433
    Location:
    Champaign, IL
    Specifically, Wilson allows it for one-piece stringing on that racquet. It's how Wilson strings their demos and pre-strung racquets, in fact.
     
  10. pvaudio

    pvaudio Legend

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2009
    Messages:
    7,543
    OMG, is that the Gran Turismo music?
     
  11. Faithfulfather

    Faithfulfather Rookie

    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2011
    Messages:
    373
    Location:
    Louisiana
    I have honestly have never seen someone string a racquet like that. "Unique" would be a good word to describe your technique. I cringe every time I see you clamp in the middle of the racquet.
     
  12. Irvin

    Irvin G.O.A.T.

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2007
    Messages:
    11,773
    Location:
    Marietta, Ga
    I know the USRSA says to not get more than 3 mains ahead but wondered if never getting more than 1 main ahead made a difference. I strung a 16 main racket doing a 3-6 method - 3(1st side,) 6 (2nd side,) 5 (1st side,) and 2 (2nd side.) Then I strung the same racket using an alternate method - 1, 2, 2, and 2 ... until finished. I did not tie off the main but instead held the ends with starting clamps. I figured the knot could make a difference. I downloaded a spectrum analyzer for my iPad and measured the frequency (y axis) of each string (x axis) and compared like numbered mains on the left and right. Below are the results of each:
    [​IMG]
    I'm not sure if it makes a difference or not as far as what one can feel in the racket but it does make a measurable difference. I would think stringing one side then the other would make an ever greater difference. I ran the test with both a constant pull and a lockout stringer. One thing I did not if the center strings had less of a frequency drop (when compared to the frequency of the outside mains) using the 3-6 method than using the alternate method. Hummm? Wonder if that makes an difference?

    I don't like stringing bottom up but on a Wilson that skips two holes top and bottom I don't think it matters as much. Wilson allows it so who and we to say you can't do it. If you have a racket that only skips one hole at the bottom you run the risk of damaging your racket. With only one skipped main hole you going from the outside main to that skipped hole for your bottom cross. This leaves a very short section of frame supporting that first pull on the bottom cross. I would prefer to have more frame to support the string when it is pulled. Also you have a main on one side that is tied off and a main on the other that is not so your racket is not symmetrical. I know there are people that use the outside main to run in the top 1 or 2 crosses but then you run the risk of having a short section of racket again that is supporting a pull. But then again Babolat allows bottom up too (they recommend all frames be strung two piece and not bottom up) and usually the only skip one hole (8T) at the bottom.

    Let's talk about what happens when you tension the crosses in a frame. As you go from one end to the other the string bed gets stiffer and stiffer as you tension more crosses. The stiffer your string bed the harder it becomes for the crosses to deflect the strings. So it would make sense to me that the string bed would be tighter where you end the crosses. I prefer that to be at the bottom.

    Then there is the practice of using one clamp in the center of your racket to hold the crosses. That allows the crosses from the clamp to the frame to go limp when tension is removed. When you pull tension on the next cross you can't pull the 1/2 of the last cross that went limp to full tension because of the friction created by the frame so you are stringing your crosses at some lower tension. I very much like to have the clamp as close to the frame as possible to shorten the length of string between the clamp and the frame that goes limp.
     
  13. MAX PLY

    MAX PLY Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2008
    Messages:
    1,698
    Fully agree with Irvin.

    I, too, play with the BLX 95 and typically string two piece for three reasons:

    (1) I play with full gut bed and I would rather not add the extra wear by pullng so much string through the frame;

    (2) Similar to (1), I just find it more convenient to manage the shorter pieces; and

    (3) I prefer to start crosses at the top (just learned habit), and 2-piece makes it easier (not that other alternative patterns are difficult).

    Having said that, I have been playing with that frame and its ancestors for many years (all same pattern) and have strung one-piece a zillion times from bottom up with never a single problem (litrally hundreds of string jobs over the years), so I would not worry about that (plus Wilson permits it).

    As to the rest, others have it right--clamp as close to the frame as you can and I really think alternating 2 or 3 (max) mains is the way to go. In my case, since I two piece, I pre-weave several holes ahead just to keep the excess string out of the way. Good luck with your stringing.
     
    Last edited: Aug 15, 2012
  14. Irvin

    Irvin G.O.A.T.

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2007
    Messages:
    11,773
    Location:
    Marietta, Ga
    Another thing you can do is use a short side ATW pattern, but I would only recommend it with a racket that skips two holes top and bottom (7&9 or 8&10) so you don't have a short section of frame supporting the transition from main to cross or vice-versa. I use 7 racket lengths (from a 40' set) for the short side and run the inside mains (omit the last one on each side.) Then use the long side to run the third cross down to the next to last and tie off. Use the short side to run the outside mains, bottom cross, and top two crosses running in the top cross first and the second cross last.

    EDIT: But my preference is still two piece no matter where the mains end.
     
  15. cluckcluck

    cluckcluck Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2010
    Messages:
    2,086
    Location:
    Between the baseline and netcord.
    I gotta say, the clamping in the middle of the bed on the mains is not good. you could potentially lose a bit of tension by double pulling a length and half.
     
  16. Irvin

    Irvin G.O.A.T.

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2007
    Messages:
    11,773
    Location:
    Marietta, Ga
    I don't think it is really a bad thing necessarily. I think you are going to get lower tensions and you won't know what they are but people string the crosses lower all the time. You may like it. The bad part is the uncertainty of the tension.
     
  17. beernutz

    beernutz Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2005
    Messages:
    4,397
    Location:
    expanding my Ignore List
  18. Irvin

    Irvin G.O.A.T.

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2007
    Messages:
    11,773
    Location:
    Marietta, Ga
  19. GlenK

    GlenK Professional

    Joined:
    Mar 20, 2011
    Messages:
    803
    Location:
    St. Augustine, FL
    Interesting. I've been working on a technique where I string each side in one direction on the mains, then rotate the racquet and string each side in the other direction. There is a lot less racquet rotation & the resulting string bed feels very plush.
    Haven't taken the time to analyze longevity, but according to Racquetune this method produces very consistent tensions.

    I'm using Jet with it and calling it the GK technique. Lol.
     
  20. Irvin

    Irvin G.O.A.T.

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2007
    Messages:
    11,773
    Location:
    Marietta, Ga
    Not so many truely original ideas anymore

    When I first started string I did that until I came across the 3-6 method. I would string two mains on one side three on the other the 2 x 2 unfinished. I found myself going around the racket either in a clockwise or counter-clockwise pattern. It is the same thing you are talking about.

    Let's say I strung 1LM & 2LM, then 1RM - 3RM, then 3LM & 4RM, then 4LM & 5LM, then 5RM & 6RM, then 6LM & 7LM, then 7RM & 8LM, and finish on 8RM. Notice how all the odd strings (which all go in the same direction) and all the even string (which all going in the same but opposite direciton) follow each other.

    Now there is a problem with the start. But what I did was to put a starting clamp on the short side (if stringing on piece) and pull the long side thereby double pulling the first two mains. I certainly hope 'diredesire' does not inactivate my login for doing that - what a stringing travesty. But think about that for just a minute I have full reference tension on the long side 1st main and almost that on the short side 1st main. Then since both 1st mains are tensioned I string one ahead on the long side. Now time to switch over to the short side. How do I get the starting clamp off? There you go full tension on the short side main. Using this method also you get the benefit of never having your clamps bumping into each other because the fist time they are on the clamp end of there're two strings between them. And if you are using flying clamps this works too, as you always have two strings to clamp with. Still wondering if you really need a starting clamp?

    I know there is a problem using a starting clamp on the outside of the frame where the string is going to bend to do the next main. I will face that issue if and when I ever have a problem. As for now I am aware it could happen. I am also very much aware of how far down in the jaws of the starting clamp I need to put my string to hold it when pulled at a given tension. And because it is lower tension than reference tension it does not have to be as far.

    Long story short after I ran the test I mentioned above - I'M BACK! No more 3-6 method or Yusuki method for me. Glen if you want to call it the 'GK Technique' that's fine with me.
     
  21. PimpMyGame

    PimpMyGame Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Nov 2, 2006
    Messages:
    2,433
    From looking at the video the bad thing is lack of consistency - it doesn't seem to me that all the mains are clamped in the middle otherwise I would 100% agree with Irvin. Far more uncertainty when some mains are clamped at the edge and some in the middle.

    To the OP - you have hit upon a very clever way of getting some constructive criticism from very experienced stringers such as Irvin. A normal "critique my stringing" thread would have not had half as much interest, so for that you should be congratulated.
     
  22. TennezSport

    TennezSport Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2006
    Messages:
    1,885
    Location:
    Northern NJ, USA
    Well........

    Eveyone else made great points about stringing technique and you should take their advise. The thing that bothered me most was the statement above which is so wrong. Precision is so important at all levels if you was a racquet that perfoms consistently. Otherwise how do you know if you are having a bad day or your racquet is causing the issues. In order to improve and better enjoy the game, precision os key. Keep practicing and listen to the suggestion of the others. Good luck, have fun.

    Cheers, TennezSport :cool:
     
  23. GlenK

    GlenK Professional

    Joined:
    Mar 20, 2011
    Messages:
    803
    Location:
    St. Augustine, FL
    LOL, I was just joking with the name. I figured others had tried it. I do use Yusuki method to start and actually string LM 1 &2, then RM 1 (repulling it where starting clamp is), then RM 2 and after that go 2 in each direction until mains completed.
    Combining that with JET does seem to produce a really plush SB. I'm such a creature of habit just kept doing since it worked so well.
    That's how I string my racquet. Use the same starting technique for every one else to start, but don't use the JET method unless requested..
     
  24. Irvin

    Irvin G.O.A.T.

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2007
    Messages:
    11,773
    Location:
    Marietta, Ga
    I know what you are saying but then when your two clamps are next to each other the first time (when you remove the starting clamp) there is only one string between them. If you have a tight string pattern the clamp are either not up close to the frame or they are up next to each other and holding the strings off the center of the grommet because you can't get them close enough together.

    You also have to have fixed clamps and a starting clamp to do that. Using the way I showed you don't have to have fixed clamps as flying clamps will work as well.
     

Share This Page